or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Oxxford trousers: why are they not lined?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Oxxford trousers: why are they not lined?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Dear Fellows, None of the six Oxxford trousers I own are lined. Why is this? What is the argument against lining trousers? Regards.
post #2 of 15
Why put a cheap acetate lining in a pair of sweet cashmere pants? I much prefer my pants to not be lined if the wool is soft enough. -Tom
post #3 of 15
All the trousers my tailor made have a piece of lining in the front that ends at the knee. I don't mind them. I would think that lining would make trousers more comfortable, since you don't have wool chafing at your thighs all the time when walking or sitting down. Also, I have hairy legs, and I'd rather not have them pulled by catching onto the wool fabric.
post #4 of 15
I once read that the British consider lined pants to be effeminate (dunno if it's true or not.) So to quote Ahnold, lined pants are for "girly men."
post #5 of 15
In today's world, lining the trousers are a must due to the average consumer's(men's wearhouse) mis-education and thinking that lined trousers are of better quality (the same as why they think fully lined coats are better quallity). Oxxford's fabrics are such quality, that the wearer would want to feel the cloth against their skin. That said, almost all of my clients want their trousers lined no matter what quality of the fabric. As apractical and technical standpoint, I personally think that it helps against bagging at the knees over time and helps the pants "glide" over your thighs as you sit down.
post #6 of 15
I do not know if lined pants make a man gurly or not but I think it serves practical purpose. When walking, I tend to sweat real quick, and pants with lining, the lining shields fabric from observing the sweat. Other than that .. I do not see requirment of a lining .. at least for me.
post #7 of 15
my chester barrie trousers - mohair mix (bought in UK) are also unlined -
post #8 of 15
Another purpose of lining is to cover up shoddy tailoring. If the pants are unlined, all the seams need to be finished cleanly. If you were to take the lining out of some pants, you'd see how sloppy the tailoring is that lies underneath. By the way, I learned that from bengal-stripe on the GQ message board (pre-SF) probably 3 years ago.
post #9 of 15
I once asked a tailor, who shall remain nameless, if he could make a custom suit with an unlined or half-lined jacket. He looked at me like I was crazy, and actually asked "why would you want an unlined jacket?" He gave me this spiel about all the benefits of lining. I thought at the time that he was an idiot; now I think he was probably just lazy. This guy runs a major tailoring establishment in Bellevue, WA (very affluent), which is why it surprised me so much. If it had been a no name shop I would have expected it. I personally like lined pants, they don't catch on my legs when I sit down, they're a little easier to put on and take off, etc. For warm weather pants though, it's a tossup.
post #10 of 15
...
post #11 of 15
Quote:
In today's world, lining the trousers are a must due to the average consumer's(men's wearhouse) mis-education and thinking that lined trousers are of better quality (the same as why they think fully lined coats are better quallity). Oxxford's fabrics are such quality, that the wearer would want to feel the cloth against their skin. That said, almost all of my clients want their trousers lined no matter what quality of the fabric. As apractical and technical standpoint, I personally think that it helps against bagging at the knees over time and helps the pants "glide" over your thighs as you sit down.
Amen.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
So to quote Ahnold, lined pants are for "girly men."
In case some of you didn't notice, that was a joke
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Another purpose of lining is to cover up shoddy tailoring. If the pants are unlined, all the seams need to be finished cleanly. If you were to take the lining out of some pants, you'd see how sloppy the tailoring is that lies underneath.
This is true, but it's more applicable to jackets than it is to trousers. Oxxford will do just about anything that you (or the retailer, for RTW) want. You can get either lined or unlined trousers from them. I prefer lined. As Manton wrote, the lining protects woolens from the ravages of your knees. In addition, even the best-quality wool fabrics often feel a bit scratchy against my skin. I don't care if the British call me effete. I'm going to get my trousers lined.
post #14 of 15
Is it possible to have a tailor line pants that are currently unlined? How much would this cost approximately. I like the feel of my unlined Oxxford pants but do worry that they won't be as durable without lining -- if properly cared for, how much shorter will trousers last (super 110s worsted) without lining? Is there any particular thing you should do to care for unlined trousers?
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Is it possible to have a tailor line pants that are currently unlined?  How much would this cost approximately.  I like the feel of my unlined Oxxford pants but do worry that they won't be as durable without lining -- if properly cared for, how much shorter will trousers last (super 110s worsted) without lining?  Is there any particular thing you should do to care for unlined trousers?
I'm sure it's possible to have them lined. Someone else will have a better idea of what's involved. I think probably the biggest thing that you can do to care for unlined trousers is to remember to pull them up a bit over your knees when you sit down so the knees don't stretch. That's a habit I doubt a lot of men nowadays still have, although I haven't really paid attention. I have always done it when wearing good pants. Lined pants generally don't require this, in my experience.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Oxxford trousers: why are they not lined?