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Ralph lifschitz featured in architectural digest - Page 4

post #46 of 70
Thread Starter 
link to michael gross's book site having not read it, i dunno if this book clarifies or makes things more confusing, but it seems relevant anyway. here's the best review on that page, IMO:
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In "Genuine Authentic," Gross walks the deft line of being sympathetic to Lauren the man without ever exactly flattering him (or, for that matter, cutting him to ribbons). ...Gross has managed to write a book that's likely to speak to business people and fashion people alike. He tells how Lauren evolved from a highly style-conscious kid in the Bronx to a salesman and then designer of neckties, to the head of a $10 billion international business. He lays out the minutiae of business deals gone wrong and explains how Lauren and his associates managed to pull back from the brink of financial disaster more than once. He also bares many of the problems that plagued Lauren's creative team over the years - namely, Lauren's tendency to ride his people hard, throwing tantrums when they were unable to read his mind, demanding from them a kind of perfection that could exist only inside his head. ...["Genuine Authentic" is] highly readable - and honorable. If Gross occasionally makes Lauren out to be a tyrant, he's also aware of Lauren's complexities. Gross shows us a man who's narcissistic and troubled, but he's also forthright about the ways in which Lauren is likable, charming and admirable. And he never diminishes Lauren's contribution to late-20th century fashion. Lauren has crowned himself the ruler of a dream kingdom in which authority and respect, a feeling of being somehow special, can be conferred by dressing in old-money classics - and, best of all, using new money to buy the whole package. "[Lauren's] saga opens a window onto one of the most taboo subjects in our increasingly borderless world - our lust for roots we no longer have and for status as a replacement for the privileges of birth," Gross writes. "It also reflects our abiding insecurity about class, and the paradox of the extraordinary wealth and cultural power that spring from the common clay of our multi-ethnic, multicultural democracy." That's a lot of weight to place on the back of a logo-embroidered knit shirt, but Gross has it right. Gross makes the case that one of the chief criticisms leveled at Lauren - that he's a "self-loathing" Jew who traded his Eastern European roots for the pretense of Waspy ones - doesn't hold water. Gross explains that many descendants of Eastern European Jewish immigrants don't know much about their heritage simply because their forebears didn't have a high stake in preserving their own bad memories of the places from which they came: They worked hard at never looking back....Gross captures what's genuinely interesting, and also very touching, about Lauren's early attempts to build a life of style for himself. If Lauren's story is proof of anything, it's that the right mix of insecurity and chutzpah can make you either very rich or very miserable - or, most likely, a combination of both. -- Newsday
***edit - i realize now the formatting of that quote makes it a headache to read - sorry about that.
post #47 of 70
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what about all the movie actors and actresses that have changed their names not because they reject their heritage or as an act of self-loathing(a little extreme, this phrase imo) but for no other reason than aesthetics &/or marketing?
What about them? BTW, *Ahnold* seemed to do okay sticking by his guns and his unpronounceable and unspellable surname, apparently against the suggestions of many image consultant types. And as a master of reinvention and an embodiment of the American Dream, I can think of nobody who would make a better poster boy than he. The guy didn't even grow up in this country, still has a distinctly foreign (and kraut at that) accent; and he is the Governator, for chrissake. Geez, I'm starting to sound Republican. I knew there was something in the water.
post #48 of 70
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(otis @ 15 Oct. 2004, 10:09) Clarification - his real name is spelled "Lifshitz".  The previous posts are correct in that he did decide to change it in his teens well before deciding to start a business.  According to various biographies it was actually his brother Jerry who came up with the name Lauren and they both changed it together.  I've read a quote by Ralph himself, I believe it was in the Oprah interview a couple of years ago, where he commented on the difficulty of growing up with a last name that contained "shit" in the spelling.   For all the naysayers, the reality is that Ralph is just living the American dream.  Sure he lives in somewhat of a fantasy world, but I think you'd be hard pressed to find anyone else who's done a better job of creating a better way of life for themselves.  I often think he's sort of living in a real life Cary Grant film, where everything is perfectly orchestrated. FYI on his houses: * Bedford - pictured in the article discussed here.  Also covered in Town & Country 1996. * Manhattan - very modern 8000 sq ft apt on 5th ave.  Pictured in AD during early 1980s, no modern coverage, but is shown briefly in recent Purple Label campaign (where Ralph is wearing the Panerai watch). * Montauk - beach "cottage", aparently where his kids spent much of their time growing up.  Also where he houses a large part of his 100+ classic auto collection.  Picture in Harper's Bazaar late 2000. * Telluride - 15,000+ acre ranch - shown in AD during late 2002. * Round Hill, Jamaica - owns a house and beachside villa at the resort.  Have never seen detailed pictures of the main house, but the villa is covered in Vogue early 2001.
I know a gentleman that owns a home in Montauk a few "˜doors' down the beach from RL's and he tells me that often you see RL in one of his classic cars...sometimes perched outside of the car, over the hood off to the side of the road because they have broken down for some reason or another. Jon.
Rather like classic, manual albeit expensive cameras. Hasselblad's frequently jam, and need to be overhauled every two years or so yet they are priced at $2,000 to over $20,000 for a set. And Rolleiflex twins leneses as well. Although those are somewhat hardier in certain senses.
post #49 of 70
The RL houndstooth wallpaper from my dressign room reference above. Sorry for the poor quality and bad lighting. Only picture currently on my laptop.
post #50 of 70
I did find one more picture of the houndstooth wallpaper.
post #51 of 70
Thread Starter 
i love looking in other peoples' closets. wow what is that tartan jacket. rather eye-popping. (not to mention the striped one in front of it. )
post #52 of 70
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wow what is that tartan jacket. rather eye-popping. (not to mention the striped one in front of it. )
The tartan jacket is a great velvet smoking jacket I bought on Ebay. The striped item in front of it is (vintage) Sulka pajamas in Sea Island cotton.
post #53 of 70
looks like rodney dangerfield's closet. i agree with la guy that changing one's last name is in bad taste, especially if you change it to mask your heritage. it's actually condescending to the audience/consumer. "i'm a great talent, but i don't think you'll realize it unless i change my name to something more familiar to you." labelking, there are some excellent vintage medium format cameras available for under $100. i'm talking about TLRs from ricoh or yashica. a great deal if you only need a standard lens.
post #54 of 70
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looks like rodney dangerfield's closet.
Show us your closet, oh wise one.
post #55 of 70
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Lauren's car collection is amazing. We're talking tens and tens of millions. Lauren's probably approaches $100mm. BTW, Tommy Hilfiger also has a very impressive collection
Yes, but when It comes to car collections, nobody tops His Majesty Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah Mu'izzaddin Waddaulah, the Sultan and Yang Di-Pertuan of Brunei Darussalam. Which includes: Custom Ferrari's with special "˜Sultan' Pininfarina bodies, such as the 6 FX's. MB Gullwings with bodies made with the original tooling, but with chassis / engines are modern 500SL. All the Formula One championship-winning racecars since 1980 Rolls Royce, Bentley, Aston-Martin and other companies have permanent mechanics stationed in the Sultans' garages. Two fully operational Ferrari Mythos road cars (originally a concept-only car) Custom convertible, coupe and sedan versions of the standard 456 Ferrari. Special RR's that are used as government vehicles that deliver a peak torque figure of 712lb ft at 2400rpm and 542bhp at 4500rpm. A few examples: Bentley Java: Ferrari FX: Aston Martin AM3: Ferrari 456 (codename-Venice) Wagon: Ferrari (no clue what this is, but holy shit): All in all there are about 5000 cars in the collection. Now, that's a collection. Jon. (of, course I rather have RL's rare vintage cars than the Sultans garage, but to each his own)
post #56 of 70
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looks like rodney dangerfield's closet. i agree with la guy that changing one's last name is in bad taste, especially if you change it to mask your heritage. it's actually condescending to the audience/consumer. "i'm a great talent, but i don't think you'll realize it unless i change my name to something more familiar to you." labelking, there are some excellent vintage medium format cameras available for under $100. i'm talking about TLRs from ricoh or yashica. a great deal if you only need a standard lens.
Oh yes, various TLR's like Yashica's are rather cheap although deliver a fine quality image. I own a Rolleiflex TLR from 1956 with a Xenotar lens that is very fine. Today's cameras cannot compare with any of these. The one gripe about older cameras is that lenses might acquire fungi or have the slight tendency to separate due to the balsam resin.
post #57 of 70
At some point, this lifestyle marketing becomes absurd. If you already like the furniture and the lamps, soon they'll be coming out with other related items- cars that have been inspired by Ralphie's personal collection. Then, there can be a line of RL toilet paper, where the polo logo is quilted into the paper. At this point, I really wouldn't be surprised- there's already RL paint. Seriously, why would people really need Ralphie's stamp of approval for paint. Can't you just buy your own, and then decide what color you want it to be.
post #58 of 70
There are perfectly acceptable albeit probably expensive furniture companies making items in styles that Lauren copys. Personally I would not buy furniture from a fashion conglomerate. The new collection from RL in furniture has a distinctly Art Deco line.
post #59 of 70
What I like most about RL furniture is the fabrics. The case goods are wonderful, made by Henredon. But many of the fabrics are menswear inspired. This small settee was a thrift market find, bought for $15. It's original upholstery was 1950's pleather (horrible). Recovered in RL Brookside houndstooth wool fabric with RL green cotton corduroy back and sides, viola a new item. Again, I don't buy RL because of the label. I buy it because it compliments the furnishings in my house which are all menswear inspired. If not RL, where would I find fabrics like these? That's why Polo is successful, they have the products that people with a passion for sartorial things want in their house for items other than clothing.
post #60 of 70
Well now we know where Kalra got his car pictures from.
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