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Is This Suit to Old School?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Does this suit look dated.  I know Oxxford to be good quality?  The suit is 20 years old.  In my amateurish opinion I thought the lapels are the give away about its age, still, the suit seems like it would look good if it fit right.

 

I'm around 5'10" with a 21" should-to-shoulder measurement.  Is the rule that wider lapels look better if you have a wide chest and shoulder measurement?  My waist measurement is around 21 inches.  I'm trying to get suits that look best on my body,not sure if I should go wide, small, or average on the lapel size.  I have an athletic build that is well muscled in the back and shoulders and above average, but not bulging chest.

 

I feel like should pads that are to pronounced look bad on me because my shoulders are already naturally pronounced because of my physique.  

 

Like I said I like the suit, but I don't want to walk out the door like Black John Travolta ready to bring back Dance Fever.

 

Thank you for any advice forthcoming about the lapel, shoulder pads, and modern versus vintage suits, looking for some advice on all the above.

 

46D35C2349DF4E7694B6D089EBF4E127.jpg

 

2DC621283BDA46F7B2D9E0136DD6E230.jpg 

post #2 of 13

Great quality, but yes..."old school" as you say.  You can no doubt still make it look good, but it all depends on what kind of look you like.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the response.  What are some things I can do to update the look or at least pull it off and not look as if I'm nostalgic for the 90's?  

 

Edit:  Can the lapel be tailored narrower?

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

bump

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShoeFinance77 View Post

What are some things I can do to update the look or at least pull it off and not look as if I'm nostalgic for the 90's?

Simply wear it unself-consciously. No man looks his best when he's constantly second guessing his choices and worrying over whether what he's wearing looks okay. If you put on that suit, and are convinced that it's a good choice and that you look fine in it, few people will think there's anything wrong with it. ("Few" people. That doesn't mean some people who care about fashion trends might not have a negative opinion of it. But in the real world, such people are a small minority.)

Does it represent current men's fashion? No, not really. But so what? None of my dress shoes are "sleek." I don't care for sleek dress shoes, at least not on my size 13EE feet. I like 1960's vintage Florsheim Royal Imperial gunboats. More casually, I wear penny loafers. Do my preferences reflect what's currently in fashion in terms of men's footwear? No, not really. But I couldn't care less. I also prefer traditional-fitting (not slim) dress shirts. I prefer neckties at least an inch wider than the 2.25" neckwear beloved by fashion magazines and pop culture celebrities at pseudo-events.

Heck, I even keep my face clean shaven, when everyone knows that the "I shave every 3rd or 4th day" look is what's currently fashionable.

I know that I look good. I like my appearance. I'm quite comfortable with my sartorial choices. And at the risk of sounding immodest, I don't believe these choices are in any way holding me back in life. Not professionally/financially, nor socially.

Point being, the suit in question is not so old fashioned as to be archaic or costume-like. It's not like you're going to look like a character from Downton Abbey, brought forward by an evil wizard to the 21st century. People aren't going to stare at you as you walk down the street. So if you like the way the suit looks on you, wear it. To the office, to social events, wherever.

So long as you believe you look okay, and you're not fretting over whether you should have had the lapels restyled (yeah, right), there's no problem. None.

If you can't work up this level of comfort with your suit, don't bother trying to have a tailor make it look more modern. Just sell it, and use the proceeds to buy a new suit.

PS - When I go out to dinner this evening, I'll likely be wearing a navy Brooks blazer, older than your Oxxford suit. And maybe - just maybe - a bow tie. And I will like the way I'll look. And I'm pretty sure my date won't be so embarrassed by my appearance as to fake a headache and end the date early. I'm reasonably confident we won't be given the table by the kitchen door, due to my looking like a refugee from season 3 of "Frasier." And it's pretty unlikely anyone in the restaurant will think to themselves, "Gee, he's not really ugly, I suppose, for a middle aged guy, but he'd look so much better if his lapels were narrower and his blazer tighter."
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post

Simply wear it unself-consciously. No man looks his best when he's constantly second guessing his choices and worrying over whether what he's wearing looks okay. If you put on that suit, and are convinced that it's a good choice and that you look fine in it, few people will think there's anything wrong with it. ("Few" people. That doesn't mean some people who care about fashion trends might not have a negative opinion of it. But in the real world, such people are a small minority.)

Does it represent current men's fashion? No, not really. But so what? None of my dress shoes are "sleek." I don't care for sleek dress shoes, at least not on my size 13EE feet. I like 1960's vintage Florsheim Royal Imperial gunboats. More casually, I wear penny loafers. Do my preferences reflect what's currently in fashion in terms of men's footwear? No, not really. But I couldn't care less. I also prefer traditional-fitting (not slim) dress shirts. I prefer neckties at least an inch wider than the 2.25" neckwear beloved by fashion magazines and pop culture celebrities at pseudo-events.

Heck, I even keep my face clean shaven, when everyone knows that the "I shave every 3rd or 4th day" look is what's currently fashionable.

I know that I look good. I like my appearance. I'm quite comfortable with my sartorial choices. And at the risk of sounding immodest, I don't believe these choices are in any way holding me back in life. Not professionally/financially, nor socially.

Point being, the suit in question is not so old fashioned as to be archaic or costume-like. It's not like you're going to look like a character from Downton Abbey, brought forward by an evil wizard to the 21st century. People aren't going to stare at you as you walk down the street. So if you like the way the suit looks on you, wear it. To the office, to social events, wherever.

So long as you believe you look okay, and you're not fretting over whether you should have had the lapels restyled (yeah, right), there's no problem. None.

If you can't work up this level of comfort with your suit, don't bother trying to have a tailor make it look more modern. Just sell it, and use the proceeds to buy a new suit.

PS - When I go out to dinner this evening, I'll likely be wearing a navy Brooks blazer, older than your Oxxford suit. And maybe - just maybe - a bow tie. And I will like the way I'll look. And I'm pretty sure my date won't be so embarrassed by my appearance as to fake a headache and end the date early. I'm reasonably confident we won't be given the table by the kitchen door, due to my looking like a refugee from season 3 of "Frasier." And it's pretty unlikely anyone in the restaurant will think to themselves, "Gee, he's not really ugly, I suppose, for a middle aged guy, but he'd look so much better if his lapels were narrower and his blazer tighter."

+100

Fantastic response. I feel exactly the same way. I love my traditional clothes and look and will always stay the same. Just because it's the "in" fashion doesn't mean it's for me. I enjoy looking a fashion and if it works for me, then I'll incorporate it into my wardrobe.

I shave everyday (including Saturday), wear my saddle bucks and penny loafers with khakis on the weekends, and my BB during the week.

I like what I wear and receive numerous compliments. Bottom line is ... wear that suit with confidence.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShoeFinance77 View Post

Is the rule that wider lapels look better if you have a wide chest and shoulder measurement?
Stands to reason this would be the case.

Think about it - assume 3.5" wide lapels. One man has broad shoulders, a wide chest, and is an NFL defensive lineman. He's 6'5" tall and weighs 320 lbs. He wears a size 56XL suit (but has it let out, because it's snug on him, off the rack). On him, on his suit, the 3.5" lapels almost look... well, maybe not truly puny, but definitely far from overly wide.

The other man is a professional jockey. He's 5'1" tall and weighs 116 lbs. His suits come from the boys department, because the smallest men's suit he can find - a size 32S - is simply too big for him. On him, on his suit, 3.5" lapels are almost cartoonishly large.

Now, admittedly, these are very extreme examples. But they do illustrate the fundamental point that the various aspects of a suit should be in proportion to each other and to the wearer.

As you're 5'10", with a 21" shoulder-to-shoulder measurement, you represent neither size extreme. You're reasonably near average, give or take a little. On you, unusually narrow lapels are likely to look narrow. And unusually wide lapels will tend to look wide.

Be happy. You have an easier time shopping for clothes than do either Filius Flitwick or Rubeus Hagrid.
post #8 of 13


Agreed, fashion is fleeting and style is forever. With 21" wide shoulders the wide lapels will be good. I too wear 1960s Florsheim and seersucker pants. Most call me old school and that suits me just fine. Current mens dress wear I live is flip flops, cargo shorts and a tee shirt.

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post

Simply wear it unself-consciously. No man looks his best when he's constantly second guessing his choices and worrying over whether what he's wearing looks okay. If you put on that suit, and are convinced that it's a good choice and that you look fine in it, few people will think there's anything wrong with it. ("Few" people. That doesn't mean some people who care about fashion trends might not have a negative opinion of it. But in the real world, such people are a small minority.)

Does it represent current men's fashion? No, not really. But so what? None of my dress shoes are "sleek." I don't care for sleek dress shoes, at least not on my size 13EE feet. I like 1960's vintage Florsheim Royal Imperial gunboats. More casually, I wear penny loafers. Do my preferences reflect what's currently in fashion in terms of men's footwear? No, not really. But I couldn't care less. I also prefer traditional-fitting (not slim) dress shirts. I prefer neckties at least an inch wider than the 2.25" neckwear beloved by fashion magazines and pop culture celebrities at pseudo-events.

Heck, I even keep my face clean shaven, when everyone knows that the "I shave every 3rd or 4th day" look is what's currently fashionable.

I know that I look good. I like my appearance. I'm quite comfortable with my sartorial choices. And at the risk of sounding immodest, I don't believe these choices are in any way holding me back in life. Not professionally/financially, nor socially.

Point being, the suit in question is not so old fashioned as to be archaic or costume-like. It's not like you're going to look like a character from Downton Abbey, brought forward by an evil wizard to the 21st century. People aren't going to stare at you as you walk down the street. So if you like the way the suit looks on you, wear it. To the office, to social events, wherever.

So long as you believe you look okay, and you're not fretting over whether you should have had the lapels restyled (yeah, right), there's no problem. None.

If you can't work up this level of comfort with your suit, don't bother trying to have a tailor make it look more modern. Just sell it, and use the proceeds to buy a new suit.

PS - When I go out to dinner this evening, I'll likely be wearing a navy Brooks blazer, older than your Oxxford suit. And maybe - just maybe - a bow tie. And I will like the way I'll look. And I'm pretty sure my date won't be so embarrassed by my appearance as to fake a headache and end the date early. I'm reasonably confident we won't be given the table by the kitchen door, due to my looking like a refugee from season 3 of "Frasier." And it's pretty unlikely anyone in the restaurant will think to themselves, "Gee, he's not really ugly, I suppose, for a middle aged guy, but he'd look so much better if his lapels were narrower and his blazer tighter."

Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post

Stands to reason this would be the case.

Think about it - assume 3.5" wide lapels. One man has broad shoulders, a wide chest, and is an NFL defensive lineman. He's 6'5" tall and weighs 320 lbs. He wears a size 56XL suit (but has it let out, because it's snug on him, off the rack). On him, on his suit, the 3.5" lapels almost look... well, maybe not truly puny, but definitely far from overly wide.

The other man is a professional jockey. He's 5'1" tall and weighs 116 lbs. His suits come from the boys department, because the smallest men's suit he can find - a size 32S - is simply too big for him. On him, on his suit, 3.5" lapels are almost cartoonishly large.

Now, admittedly, these are very extreme examples. But they do illustrate the fundamental point that the various aspects of a suit should be in proportion to each other and to the wearer.

As you're 5'10", with a 21" shoulder-to-shoulder measurement, you represent neither size extreme. You're reasonably near average, give or take a little. On you, unusually narrow lapels are likely to look narrow. And unusually wide lapels will tend to look wide.

Be happy. You have an easier time shopping for clothes than do either Filius Flitwick or Rubeus Hagrid.

Thanks Mike. Your input is deeply appreciated. Especially since it applies to not only the suit in the picture, but any suits I purchase going forward.
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 

1


Edited by ShoeFinance77 - 10/11/16 at 5:18am
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post


Simply wear it unself-consciously. No man looks his best when he's constantly second guessing his choices and worrying over whether what he's wearing looks okay. If you put on that suit, and are convinced that it's a good choice and that you look fine in it, few people will think there's anything wrong with it. ("Few" people. That doesn't mean some people who care about fashion trends might not have a negative opinion of it. But in the real world, such people are a small minority.)

Does it represent current men's fashion? No, not really. But so what? None of my dress shoes are "sleek." I don't care for sleek dress shoes, at least not on my size 13EE feet. I like 1960's vintage Florsheim Royal Imperial gunboats. More casually, I wear penny loafers. Do my preferences reflect what's currently in fashion in terms of men's footwear? No, not really. But I couldn't care less. I also prefer traditional-fitting (not slim) dress shirts. I prefer neckties at least an inch wider than the 2.25" neckwear beloved by fashion magazines and pop culture celebrities at pseudo-events.

Heck, I even keep my face clean shaven, when everyone knows that the "I shave every 3rd or 4th day" look is what's currently fashionable.

I know that I look good. I like my appearance. I'm quite comfortable with my sartorial choices. And at the risk of sounding immodest, I don't believe these choices are in any way holding me back in life. Not professionally/financially, nor socially.

Point being, the suit in question is not so old fashioned as to be archaic or costume-like. It's not like you're going to look like a character from Downton Abbey, brought forward by an evil wizard to the 21st century. People aren't going to stare at you as you walk down the street. So if you like the way the suit looks on you, wear it. To the office, to social events, wherever.

So long as you believe you look okay, and you're not fretting over whether you should have had the lapels restyled (yeah, right), there's no problem. None.

If you can't work up this level of comfort with your suit, don't bother trying to have a tailor make it look more modern. Just sell it, and use the proceeds to buy a new suit.

PS - When I go out to dinner this evening, I'll likely be wearing a navy Brooks blazer, older than your Oxxford suit. And maybe - just maybe - a bow tie. And I will like the way I'll look. And I'm pretty sure my date won't be so embarrassed by my appearance as to fake a headache and end the date early. I'm reasonably confident we won't be given the table by the kitchen door, due to my looking like a refugee from season 3 of "Frasier." And it's pretty unlikely anyone in the restaurant will think to themselves, "Gee, he's not really ugly, I suppose, for a middle aged guy, but he'd look so much better if his lapels were narrower and his blazer tighter."

Confidence, or lack there of, wasn't the issue here.  I feel passion should be exuded in everything a man does, including fashion.  Wear what you love and love what you wear, and this particular suit I loved the cut, color, fabric, and knew Oxxford to make really great suits, but the lapels were the one thing I wasn't in love with. Minor hangups like these are tailor-made for a Styleforum post.  I love to hear opinions of others who also are interested in fashion or dressing sharp. 

 

Your response was exactly what I was looking for.  I don't require affirmation of my original perspective, nor are these rhetorical questions that I already have the answers to.  The point is to engender a candid conversation about fashion trends and what does and does not look good on different people.

 

I tell you what I like, you tell me what you like, and it might give me the impetus to try new things that I have not considered as possibilities for myself. With everyone having a different take on style, the possiblities are endless.  

 

This board is awesome! 

post #12 of 13
Prominent stripes on lapels tend to make the chest look bigger. With that, the fitted cut, and the athletic physique, the end result might look too dramatic.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Score!Makes sense and resonates with my fashion tastes. Sure, I like a dabble of bold looks in my wardrobe,but for the most part I tend to like understated elegance. Of course understated elegance is in the eye if the beholder.
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