or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Need Job Advice
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Need Job Advice

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I recently started a new job at a firm X. Literally hours into the first day of work, I received a phone call from a firm I previously interviewed with last year, Firm Y. Firm Y offered me a position with them. Firm Y's pay scale is comparable to Firm X, but Firm Y made a better impression on me and I seemed to click more with their associates. More importantly, Firm Y requires fewer hours than current Firm X. I've decided to bite the bullet and jump ship one week into my new job.

I just got my job offer from Firm Y in the mail and plan on going in to work tomorrow and talking with my boss (assuming he shows up on weekends), and just try to be as polite and upfront about my resignation as possible. I will tell him that Firm Y seems like a "better fit", and my decision is not based on any difference in the work or people at Firm X.

Should I feel guilty about leaving my current new job high and dry and without the usual two weeks, or would you SFers do the same thing in my position? I don't want to burn any bridges, but at the same time, I feel like I need to do what's best for me. This situation is bit sticky because both firms practice in the same area of law, so I might run into people from Firm X very soon.

WHAT SHOULD I DO? Please advise.
post #2 of 20
I did something similar, just a different job(Welder)

However...

I had mentioned in the first place when I started my new job that I have applied at other firms and might leave sometime soon. And I did. Best being upfront and honest about it, then it won't be such a shock if you move on.

Still this came out of the blue so i say take a deep breath and take the better job, look after number one mate...
post #3 of 20
If you are in i-banking (assumption based on your use of the term associate), chances are they won't give you the week anyway, they will still pay you, but you will have to leave that day.

If you are not, then a week is rough, but think about it. You are brand new. Is there anything you are working on that will absolutely fall through the cracks if you leave? Probably not. Will that extra week make all the difference for them and save them from imminent distress? I doubt it.

If Y is the better fit, do it, or you will regret it.
post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gav View Post
I had mentioned in the first place when I started my new job that I have applied at other firms and might leave sometime soon. And I did. Best being upfront and honest about it, then it won't be such a shock if you move on.

Still this came out of the blue so i say take a deep breath and take the better job, look after number one mate...

I wouldn't think it would be a shock to the Firm X that I had applied to other firms during the job search phase - it would be SOP. Firm Y's offer came through only after I started working, but had already interviewed there during my job search. It would be dishonest if you were actively seeking other jobs right after starting your new one.

Quote:
If you are in i-banking (assumption based on your use of the term associate), chances are they won't give you the week anyway, they will still pay you, but you will have to leave that day.

If you are not, then a week is rough, but think about it. You are brand new. Is there anything you are working on that will absolutely fall through the cracks if you leave? Probably not. Will that extra week make all the difference for them and save them from imminent distress? I doubt it.

Not i-banking - legal field. My biggest worry is developing a bad rep right out of the gate for quitting as boss is well-respected in the field. They've given me a few responsibilities but nothing substantial - they might end up a little short-handed for a week or so. However, doing some research on Firm X, I do know for a fact they have a high turnover rate.
post #5 of 20
This is pretty bad form- you should have avoided the situation in the first place by communicating to firm Y that you had another offer, and that you needed a decision soon. You also should have asked firm X form more time to decide on your offer.
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post
This is pretty bad form- you should have avoided the situation in the first place by communicating to firm Y that you had another offer, and that you needed a decision soon. You also should have asked firm X form more time to decide on your offer.

I did actually tell firm Y about the pending offer, and they acted IMO as fast as practically possibly given the holiday season. They got back to me the day after New Year. Unfortunately, that was also shortly after work began at firm X. Firm X had already kept the offer open for a couple of weeks, before the end of 2007. IMO, I couldn't sit around and wait for firm Y to get back to me (w/a potential rejection) and let Firm X wait more. At that time, I thought I could end up with no job in the New Year.
post #7 of 20
If you have no qualms with being seen as a mercenary, then quit and take the better job. I doubt you'll ever be able to salvage your reputation with the first firm though, so dont plan to ever go back there.
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyquik View Post
If you have no qualms with being seen as a mercenary, then quit and take the better job. I doubt you'll ever be able to salvage your reputation with the first firm though, so dont plan to ever go back there.

As a newbie in the field, I haven't had time to develop a reputation yet as a mercenary for hire and it's definitely not about money. However, you are definitely right about the first firm and any future relationship with them. I figure the best possible scenario for me is to leave on neutral terms and hope management understands.
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by fox in sox View Post
As a newbie in the field, I haven't had time to develop a reputation yet as a mercenary for hire and it's definitely not about money. However, you are definitely right about the first firm and any future relationship with them. I figure the best possible scenario for me is to leave on neutral terms and hope management understands.

Clearly not ideal or perfect form. But, given your "newbie" status (and depending on the size of Firm X) they might not even care/notice.

Its not a decision I would make, if the new firm wants you now, they'll probably take you in a year. And, IMO, impressions during interviewing have limited value. Also, FWIW, I think hours are a silly reason to pick Firm A over B -- then again, I'm a fan of BigLaw. All of that said, its your life and its more likely that few, if any, people will even remember this 6 mo-yr. from now.
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsist View Post
Clearly not ideal or perfect form. But, given your "newbie" status (and depending on the size of Firm X) they might not even care/notice. Its not a decision I would make, if the new firm wants you now, they'll probably take you in a year. And, IMO, impressions during interviewing have limited value. Also, FWIW, I think hours are a silly reason to pick Firm A over B -- then again, I'm a fan of BigLaw. All of that said, its your life and its more likely that few, if any, people will even remember this 6 mo-yr. from now.
Thanks for the advice and opinion. Unfortunately, I'm not talking about Biglaw here (Had decent grades, main journal, but non T25 school). If it was Biglaw, I wouldn't care because they are all in the same ballpark for hours/lifestyle (i.e., not really "QOL" places regardless of their sales pitch). For firm atmosphere/associate happiness, IMHO it's easier to gauge these factors at small/midlaw firms because of the smaller numbers. As for the hours, I don't mind working long hours. However, when the compensation is much lower than Biglaw, things like hours do become a substantial factor to me. If you can't have the large salary, you might as well have a better QOL and not force yourself to work weekends.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsist View Post
Clearly not ideal or perfect form.
And, IMO, impressions during interviewing have limited value.
+1

At this stage you probably know almost nothing about the true dynamics in both places. There is a risk that if you move and things don't work out well, you will remain empty handed.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by fox in sox View Post
...I've decided to bite the bullet and jump ship one week into my new job... ...WHAT SHOULD I DO? Please advise.
I did this once because the commute at "firm X" turned out to be too long -- 2 ½ - 4 hours one-way. The jilted employer clearly did not like it at all! This is not a very good thing to do... However, let me state the following:
  • Yes, you should look out for Number One (yourself) and take the better job -- while complying with the best business etiquette that you can under the circumstances.
  • Yes, you should feel badly (guilty) about doing this. You can pray for forgiveness, sacrifice a goat, or otherwise work off some karma, but you will eventually get over it.
  • You should give your current employer two weeks written notice. Look for an appropriate sample letter on the internet... While the new employer should be able to support this, the current employer will probably walk you out right now! Be sure to clear out any personal items beforehand. And don't forget to duck!
  • Yes, you should not make a habit of doing this.
Remember; look out for Number Once -- while complying with the best business etiquette that you can under the circumstances... Too bad about your karma, though...
post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orsini View Post
I did this once because the commute at "firm X" turned out to be too long -- 2 ½ - 4 hours one-way. The jilted employer clearly did not like it at all! This is not a very good thing to do...

[*]You should give your current employer two weeks written notice. Look for an appropriate sample letter on the internet... While the new employer should be able to support this, the current employer will probably walk you out right now! Be sure to clear out any personal items beforehand. And don't forget to duck!
[*]Yes, you should not make a habit of doing this. [/list]Remember; look out for Number Once -- while complying with the best business etiquette that you can under the circumstances...

Too bad about your karma, though...

Yeah, I definitely understand their situation and the temporary bind it puts firm X in. Unfortunately, I can't give the two weeks notice - Firm Y wants to start me right away so I'll have to live with that. I'll deal with the fallout that might occur...besides, I haven't even been settled in long enough to have any personal items in my office. In fact, they hadn't even issued me a key to the office for weekends or a bathroom key

I will state I know a decent amount about both firms' history/background/atmosphere - these offers weren't a result of mass mailing/cold calls. I had the privilege of getting info on the two firms from an in-house attorney who regularly outsources work to Firms X and Y.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by fox in sox View Post
...I can't give the two weeks notice - Firm Y wants to start me right away...
That is really too bad...for "Firm X". If you were 110% sure that "Firm X" would walk you out the same day as soon as you gave the two-weeks notice you could do it anyway and thus maintain appearances while not ending up in a scheduling pickle with "Firm Y". As it is, you have to do what you must: look out for Number One while complying with the best business etiquette that you can under the circumstances. It appears that you have done the best you can under the circumstances. Good luck to you. (If there was a emoticon for "crocodile tears", I would put one here... )
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Just a short update - ironically, I get my keys and nameplate today. My boss was unavailable until the afternoon. When I asked to see him in private, he gave me a weird look and still had no idea about where the conversation was heading until he heard the magic words "offer at another firm". He made a wise crack and then wished me luck at the new place. As expected, he didn't mention the two weeks and asked whether I was leaving immediately, or tomorrow. Unfortunately, I still have to show up tomorrow to turn in my newly acquired keys and sign my termination papers...still have to see if anything comes of my abrupt departure.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Need Job Advice