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Tailor strategy in Hong Kong

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Hi, fist time poster but following this great forum for some time now.

 

Would love to get your insight on how many tailor I should see on an upcoming trip though HK.

I am planning to upgrade my wardrobe with several new suits, couple of blazers and pants (put on some pounds). Hence an opportunity to try some new tailors.

I have several days in HK on a stopover trip and one day on the way back, which I thought would give enough time to do one or two fittings (most tailors confirmed that this should be possible).

 

What I am wondering is whether I should go to a few tailors to check out their craftsmanship, kind of build a knowledge base (who I like) for the future or stick to a few and build a relationship with the ones who also travel through where I live even thought they might not be “the best”. I don’t travel to HK too often but some tailors have intl. trunk shows (lots of pro and cons on that topic for a different discussion)

 

Initially I thought to hit a few more but currently I am considering just sticking to three. Two of the three travel through my country so easy to do follow up orders and the other one is good value and I have had suits made for me before (when I was just starting out in work) which I was happy with. I am also considering to check out in addition one or two more tailors for shirts only (e.g. Janzen, AC) to allow for future online/phone orders.

 

For what’s worth the suit tailors I am considering are WWChan, Practical Tailor and William Cheng & Sons. All three travel and the first two also visit my country in Europe.

 

From what I know these three are somewhat different as they cover the mid to high end spectrum. Over time the idea is to move up spectrum as much as possible but e.g. don’t feel like dropping everything to WWC yet…

 

The other ones I was considering are: Gordon Yao, William Yu, Lee Baron (Peter Lee), Roger Concept, Baron Kay but they are not traveling or visiting my country hence a bit hesitant if the focus is to use them more often if they were to travel…

 

Any thoughts welcome!

post #2 of 27
Realistically, I think stick with WW Chan is the best bet on craftsmanship and your travel habits.

It is close to impossible to get the "prefect" suit without a good clue of what you like in terms of fit / make and works for you, the benefit of going to WW Chan is that you have the best chance to have an "adequate" first bespoke which you will actually wears in the long run.

The worst pain for me is to work with a new tailor, tried your best, and got a suit which although fits well but I will never wear it due to the difference of anesthetics between me and the tailor.
post #3 of 27
I have used three different tailors over the last eight years, you need indeed a "strategy". I think you need to trade-off between price vs. quality vs. attitude + it all depends if you have more than say 5 days there. Shorter than that, you won't get a decent one. THat's for one fitting, I believe.


I found the best quality on a really consistent level was A Man Hing Cheon in the Mandarin Oriental, even though I hate their damn attitude. They are rude, arrogant and sometimes let you wait for too long.......but but but....their products are really top-notch. I never had a bad product, the worst thing was that they had made some wrong cuts on shirts, but they redid them after I complained. As they have a bad attitude, you need to know tailoring basics a bit, otherwise they will push you into a shitty fit. You should know what a shoulder, butt or waist should look like. My first pair of pants looked really awful, cut-wise, so I sent them back 3-4 times, and overtime they bitched about my requests.....Try to get an appointment with Peter, he seemed the most down-to-earth person, the rest is a bunch of dickheads, seriously.

WWC...everybody talks about them, also because "The Armoury" really pushes them. I find them too expensive compared to the rest of the crowd. I also didn't like their long waiting time, but I have not used them (for these reasons).

For shirts I can recommend "David's Shirts" in the building next to A Man Hing Cheong. AMHC also makes really great shirts at very reasonable prices, but once I stopped buying suits two years ago, I also stopped ordering shirts there. Their attitude just gave me too much. David's is a bit more pricey, but absolutely worth it. I can recommend it, no disappointment so far.

For pants I usually order from William Yu in Mody Road (unfortunately on the Kowloon side). Careful btw, I think there are two William Yu in Hong Kong. The one in Mody Road makes awesome pants, I always get compliments for even the most basic one. Pricing is cheaper than WWC or AMHC.

I wanted to try Gordon Yao for a blazer a couple of weeks ago, but.......how can I say this.....I sensed the same sort of arrogance as AMHC. He even said "You seem like a picky customer, for us this is not good, we not like...", so I left the shop and decided to keep wearing my old blazer.
post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 

Finally back from some business travel and just wanted to say thank for your comments.

It is really helpful. It seem that fewer is better than many tailors and that there are still a few gems to be uncovered!

post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonsand View Post

Finally back from some business travel and just wanted to say thank for your comments.
It is really helpful. It seem that fewer is better than many tailors and that there are still a few gems to be uncovered!


so what did you actually buy?
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbolo View Post

I have used three different tailors over the last eight years, you need indeed a "strategy". I think you need to trade-off between price vs. quality vs. attitude + it all depends if you have more than say 5 days there. Shorter than that, you won't get a decent one. THat's for one fitting, I believe.


I found the best quality on a really consistent level was A Man Hing Cheon in the Mandarin Oriental, even though I hate their damn attitude. They are rude, arrogant and sometimes let you wait for too long.......but but but....their products are really top-notch. I never had a bad product, the worst thing was that they had made some wrong cuts on shirts, but they redid them after I complained. As they have a bad attitude, you need to know tailoring basics a bit, otherwise they will push you into a shitty fit. You should know what a shoulder, butt or waist should look like. My first pair of pants looked really awful, cut-wise, so I sent them back 3-4 times, and overtime they bitched about my requests.....Try to get an appointment with Peter, he seemed the most down-to-earth person, the rest is a bunch of dickheads, seriously.

WWC...everybody talks about them, also because "The Armoury" really pushes them. I find them too expensive compared to the rest of the crowd. I also didn't like their long waiting time, but I have not used them (for these reasons).

For shirts I can recommend "David's Shirts" in the building next to A Man Hing Cheong. AMHC also makes really great shirts at very reasonable prices, but once I stopped buying suits two years ago, I also stopped ordering shirts there. Their attitude just gave me too much. David's is a bit more pricey, but absolutely worth it. I can recommend it, no disappointment so far.

For pants I usually order from William Yu in Mody Road (unfortunately on the Kowloon side). Careful btw, I think there are two William Yu in Hong Kong. The one in Mody Road makes awesome pants, I always get compliments for even the most basic one. Pricing is cheaper than WWC or AMHC.

I wanted to try Gordon Yao for a blazer a couple of weeks ago, but.......how can I say this.....I sensed the same sort of arrogance as AMHC. He even said "You seem like a picky customer, for us this is not good, we not like...", so I left the shop and decided to keep wearing my old blazer.

Wow, surprised that GY would say such a thing. Always seem to be professional at all times.
post #7 of 27
Yes, not my experience with GY, who was very accommodating and gentlemanly.
post #8 of 27

I think WWC is your best bet, given they are known for consistency of their work. In a long run, it's better to be able to build a relationship with the tailor/cutter and them travelling to your country enables that.  Plus the details, particularly the buttonholes of WWC are a treat. Some tailors offer milanese buttonholes on lapel but again the quality of handwork differs (threading less dense, shape is not straight etc). Just make sure you get in touch with them in advance and ask for Patrick.

 

If you were in HK a bit longer, I would recommend you to check out other tailors just for the build-up of knowledge. It's rather fun and proximity of places in HK (thanks to 7m people in a small city) will work to your advantage. 

post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by aerogaa View Post

I think WWC is your best bet, given they are known for consistency of their work. In a long run, it's better to be able to build a relationship with the tailor/cutter and them travelling to your country enables that.  Plus the details, particularly the buttonholes of WWC are a treat. Some tailors offer milanese buttonholes on lapel but again the quality of handwork differs (threading less dense, shape is not straight etc). Just make sure you get in touch with them in advance and ask for Patrick.

If you were in HK a bit longer, I would recommend you to check out other tailors just for the build-up of knowledge. It's rather fun and proximity of places in HK (thanks to 7m people in a small city) will work to your advantage. 

No doubt about it .
post #10 of 27
It's nice to join your guys here. I am a rookie at buying suit in HK. I would like to know the pricing of WWChan. Please help. Also what is the current (average price) that I should look for? I know it's depending on quality of fabrics, but just say Baberis cloth. Thank you in advance. I may stay there 10 days so I don't need it so quick. I heard that some tailors can have it done in 2 days at your hotel, but I don't need them that quick and hope I can find some better tailors. Thanks guys
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaylin69 View Post

It's nice to join your guys here. I am a rookie at buying suit in HK. I would like to know the pricing of WWChan. Please help. Also what is the current (average price) that I should look for? I know it's depending on quality of fabrics, but just say Baberis cloth. Thank you in advance. I may stay there 10 days so I don't need it so quick. I heard that some tailors can have it done in 2 days at your hotel, but I don't need them that quick and hope I can find some better tailors. Thanks guys

I think its about $1,500 for VBC cloth.
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragon8 View Post

I think its about $1,500 for VBC cloth.

Chan is running a promotion in their HK store but 10 days is shorter than their normal delivery time .
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragon8 View Post

I think its about $1,500 for VBC cloth.
Wow. That's not that much saving as I expected. My local guy would do a bespoke for just over 2000 CAD. How many basted fitting can I expect before the suit is finished? How is the craftsmanship of WWC comparing with AMHC and Gordon Yao? Thanks for the info here
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by CloudLi View Post

Wow. That's not that much saving as I expected. My local guy would do a bespoke for just over 2000 CAD. How many basted fitting can I expect before the suit is finished? How is the craftsmanship of WWC comparing with AMHC and Gordon Yao? Thanks for the info here

You can get at least 2 fittings with Chan and I think 10 days is enough to get a suit made.

I never used AMHC but GY in the past (more than 4 years) was comparable to Chan and IMO a bit better in the finishing than Chan. There are others on this board that used GY recently and said that the quality has gone downhill so you may want to ask others.
post #15 of 27
I think WWC starting price is USD 1600 for a VBC entry fabric from the last time I checked earlier this year. But best to just contact them, give them a call or write an email.

AMHC offers very high quality suit, especially in the past. However from what I heard from other old tailors in HK, which I also believe is plausible, is that it depends on which tailor behind the scene is assigned to make your suit. They seem to assign the highly experienced (few) ones to long time customers. Not a customer myself but my dad was a regular customer back in his days and his suits from AMHC were impeccable in terms of craftsmanship and build (can also be a styling thing) compared to what I see in their shop these days.
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