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Colin Kaepernick is an a-hole - Page 6

post #76 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by double00 View Post

what's with you?

lots of people don't watch the news. agree or disagree?

lots of people watch football. agree? disagree?

fuck me you're obtuse. his *point* is that Kaep is rehashing played out news for the sake of self-aggrandizement.

or it could be that he's bringing the issue to a potentially different audience in a different way.

What's wrong with me? Well, I guess above average reading comprehension in this case.

Broseph, instead of setting up your strawmen in a row here why not just say something like, "I didn't catch Rumple had highlighted a certain part, and while you're correct that part is the truth, I disagree with the bulk of what whnay is saying." At least that way you've not boxed yourself into the position where you have to try and argue against, you know, actual facts.
post #77 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by whnay. View Post

Yeah I thought that was particularly exceptional. His views along with Jerry Rice, Shaq and Charles Barkley really stand out for me. It's a shame how little precious air time they get relative to the folks that are kneeling.

 

I suppose this comment actually highlights where I may disagree with you on CK. This alludes to the problem being more about the media's coverage, which makes more sense to me than being a problem with CK himself. Aside from the sock thing (which actually predated the media coverage), I've found that CK has handled himself pretty well and has stayed fairly low key. I don't think he's a particularly bright or enlightened guy that thought through some grand strategy. I think he feels strongly about an issue and like a lot of young (and often naive kids) kinda felt like doing something that he thought felt right.  It's more how the media has covered it that has blown it up.

post #78 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


This does not negate what whnay said however, and what he said, is quite correct.

 

Yet what has been accomplished?  What real dialogue has been made?  How many police departments have taken an honest look at their training and tactics and reevaluated them and made changes?   Obviously "non stop headlines for a over a year" is just not enough to spark discussion that ends with change or else CK would not have felt compelled to do what he did.

post #79 of 107

I also appreciated Isaiah Crowell, who, rightfully so, got called out for posting on Instragram a disgusting picture of a cop getting his throat slit. He didn't just apologize. He didn't just offer to donate money to the Dallas Fallen Officer's Foundation. He went down to Dallas, went to funerals for some of the murdered cops, talked to active cops, and promised to stay active with the group.

 

The head of the foundation said the other day that he is still in touch with Isaiah. "I can't even describe the type of emotion I feel when I see Isaiah, the message resonating with him, what service and sacrifice mean. I consider Isaiah my little brother, because this young man was willing to listen.”

post #80 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpelstiltskin View Post

Yet what has been accomplished?  What real dialogue has been made?  How many police departments have taken an honest look at their training and tactics and reevaluated them and made changes?   Obviously "non stop headlines for a over a year" is just not enough to spark discussion that ends with change or else CK would not have felt compelled to do what he did.

Yeah, you're right. Things are exactly the same as they were two years ago. rolleyes.gif
post #81 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by zalb916 View Post
 

 

This would actually be pretty awesome. Seriously. Like really awesome.

 

I thought Michael Jordan did pretty well:

 

“I was raised by parents who taught me to love and respect people regardless of their race or background, so I am saddened and frustrated by the divisive rhetoric and racial tensions that seem to be getting worse as of late. I know this country is better than that, and I can no longer stay silent. We need to find solutions that ensure people of color receive fair and equal treatment AND that police officers – who put their lives on the line every day to protect us all – are respected and supported.

 

“Over the past three decades I have seen up close the dedication of the law enforcement officers who protect me and my family. I have the greatest respect for their sacrifice and service. I also recognize that for many people of color their experiences with law enforcement have been different than mine. I have decided to speak out in the hope that we can come together as Americans, and through peaceful dialogue and education, achieve constructive change.

 

“To support that effort, I am making contributions of $1 million each to two organizations, the International Association of Chiefs of Police’s newly established Institute for Community-Police Relations and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. The Institute for Community-Police Relations’ policy and oversight work is focused on building trust and promoting best practices in community policing. My donation to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, the nation’s oldest civil rights law organization, will support its ongoing work in support of reforms that will build trust and respect between communities and law enforcement. Although I know these contributions alone are not enough to solve the problem, I hope the resources will help both organizations make a positive difference.

 

“We are privileged to live in the world’s greatest country – a country that has provided my family and me the greatest of opportunities. The problems we face didn’t happen overnight and they won’t be solved tomorrow, but if we all work together, we can foster greater understanding, positive change and create a more peaceful world for ourselves, our children, our families and our communities.”

 

 

Jordan has never ever waded into these waters.  He had to be been shamed into making a statement.  

post #82 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


Yeah, you're right. Things are exactly the same as they were two years ago. rolleyes.gif

 

 

Let's see what happens after the next police shooting.  We shouldn't have to wait long.  In 5...4...3...2...1...

post #83 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpelstiltskin View Post


Let's seeWell the next police shooting should be in about 5...4...3...2...1

You're barking up the wrong tree here. Go read the police shooting thread and my position on police violence should be clear. Don't let that stop a good "right side of history" rant though. wink.gif
post #84 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


You're barking up the wrong tree here. Go read the police shooting thread and my position on police violence should be clear. Don't let that stop a good "right side of history" rant though. wink.gif

 

 

I didn't eat lunch today

 

 

willem-dafoe-snickers-hed-2016.jpg

post #85 of 107

ok. congrats Piob, you've sprung your pedantic trap. clever girl. in the future i will keep your sharp lesson in mind. sound good?

 

and tho i could do without the hairsplitting, i appreciate you recognizing my actual point and will offer another way of looking at it: if nobody watches the news, is it really a matter of public consciousness? a phenomenon that is actually germane to the Kaep thing is the different ways people become aware of (and process) these movements. there is lots of room for a multiplicity of responses, reactions etc and i believe that it's important to search for validity within those seemingly divergent viewpoints. frankly i don't have time for or trust insular, smug, *right-thinking* bullshit. 

post #86 of 107

I was promised more arguing in this thread.

post #87 of 107
More double nothing for half the price.
post #88 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by zalb916 View Post

Do you want to know what "the struggle" is? Here's one example from our own forum the other day:

I know Medwed thinks that he is not renting to a group of people, because they are shitty tenants, not because they are black. However, what he's doing is believing that all people who are black possess the same inferior characteristic (i.e. being shitty tenants). That's, literally, the definition of racism. By doing so, he excludes all black people from having the same opportunity that all people who are not black have to rent apartments. That makes life more of a struggle for all the black people who, in fact, aren't shitty tenants.

Very unfortunate, but I don't blame people like Medwed, I blame criminality within black culture that ruins it for law abiding black Americans who suffer because they're painted with a broad brush. As long as there's a movement to blame white people, this is never going to end.

Idiots like Colin Kaepernick make black youth feel as though every obstacle they face is the result of some white person lurking in the shadows, holding them back. People don't succeed in that environment. In fact, it almost guarantees they won't succeed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by zalb916 View Post

Now, add in some other things: the lack of a dad to teach you stuff, the lack of good role models in your community, shittier schools than other kids, no parents of your friends to hook you up with a summer job, not having access to a good lawyer to get you off the hook when you do the same stupid thing kids across town do, etc. Some people just have to work a little harder to overcome more adversities in life. Sometimes these things have nothing to do with their own poor decisions. It's just their lot in life, and it sometimes is a result of people like Medwed who just make it harder for them because he thinks all black people are shitty tenants.

Those are big problems. Here are some solutions. Black women should stop having babies out of wedlock. They should start using condoms and birth control more often. Youth should stop dropping out of school at such high rates and committing crime vastly disproportionate to their population, and maybe they'd know people with better jobs to do them favors. Or we could just keep blaming white people, that seems to be working great. Let's give it 50 more years of denying responsibility and avoiding truth because it makes people uncomfortable and jeopardizes the consistency of the black vote. Maybe then we can draw some conclusions.
post #89 of 107

^ Damn, why didn't we think of that before! Its so simple!

 

thanks Suited!

post #90 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post


Very unfortunate, but I don't blame people like Medwed, I blame criminality within black culture that ruins it for law abiding black Americans who suffer because they're painted with a broad brush. As long as there's a movement to blame white people, this is never going to end.
 

 

 

That damned King (not Don, the other one...the criminal with the dream).  All those years ago he was fighting whitey for the right to live equally when he really should have been marching against black culture

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

Let's give it 50 more years of denying responsibility and avoiding truth because it makes people uncomfortable and jeopardizes the consistency of the black vote. Maybe then we can draw some conclusions.
 

Was there ever a time in American history that a black person got a fair shake from society and had the same rights and the same opportunities to excel as a white person?   When were those golden years?

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