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Usage of the term "suiting" - Page 2

post #16 of 22

**fashion e-commerce site menu of 2026**

 

suiting

jacketing

shirting

panting

knitting

shoeing

post #17 of 22
It might be an evolution of English language, but I'm not sure it is in a good direction. I think it is driven not by native English speakers and their needs to describe changing environment, but by the whole world, for most of whom English is a second language, and used only for basic communication - not used to express any deep thought and without any aesthetic intent.
I know, I am one of them. Before moving to NA, I used to sit on meetings or conf calls with 10+ people speaking English, getting things done and none of us were native English speakers. All sorts of nasty language constructs were used, but who cares. I can imagine something like "suiting" being baked in similar type of kitchen.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChetB View Post

**fashion e-commerce site menu of 2026**

suiting
jacketing
shirting
panting
knitting
shoeing

You misspelled pantsing.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt S View Post


It's not just businesses that use it but also magazines and newspapers in their articles about suits. Whenever I read a New York Times article about men's style these days they always mention "suiting".

 

Normal, I have never read a proper or correct article about classic dressing on any so called dressing blog, then how to expect on any newspaper or magazine?

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SartodiNapoli View Post

I have never read a proper or correct article about classic dressing on any so called dressing blog, then how to expect on any newspaper or magazine?
It's uncommon for an expert in any field - economics, cosmology, firearms, film making, etc. - to regard any article about his field, which is published in the popular press, to be particularly accurate.

I don't see why classic dressing would be any exception.
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigBadBernard View Post

'Suiting' is, of course the cloth.

'Jacking' is a verb. As in, ...off

Sorry, I meant "jacketing". But nobody has a car?
post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Count de Monet View Post

Also, I believe what AC meant was using "oxford" to describe any shoe dressier than Chuck Taylors having laces.  In other words, blurring the "open lacing/closed lacing" distinction.  I have even noticed that on Alden & AE's websites, i.e. referring to a derby or blucher as an oxford.  Folks you'd think would know better. 

I know what he meant. Americans use the terms "bal" and "blucher" to differentiate between open and close lacing. Alden & AE have used the term oxford to be any lace-up shoe long before the internet existed. Oxford simply means something different to Americans than it does to the British, just as suspenders and pants are different to the Americans. None of these are recent changes. Where do we draw the line with misuse compared to the development of regional differences?
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