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Tailors: The Next Generation (A Simon Crompton Symposium) - Page 3

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post
 

I will not spend many other words because really what I already wrote what I had to say.

 

However, just by looking at your suit, made by us, everyone would say we are far, stars and universes, from what all the others do and you could see our suit from thousand feets away.

Mentioning some of our carachteristics (small armhole, full sleeve and all the others - made in the way we do it, where these things make sense) were just to say that our jacket is the union of many many things that render them a distinguishable housecut from all the others. If you would had put our suit together with Cifonelli, Liverano, Panico and Anderson & Sheppard, it would had nothing in common with all of them. 

 

Your mistake is to put everyone into the same basket when clearly it is not.

post #32 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Musella View Post

I will not spend many other words because really what I already wrote what I had to say.

However, just by looking at your suit, made by us, everyone would say we are far, stars and universes, from what all the others do and you could see our suit from thousand feets away.
Mentioning some of our carachteristics (small armhole, full sleeve and all the others - made in the way we do it, where these things make sense) were just to say that our jacket is the union of many many things that render them a distinguishable housecut from all the others. If you would had put our suit together with Cifonelli, Liverano, Panico and Anderson & Sheppard, it would had nothing in common with all of them. 

Your mistake is to put everyone into the same basket when clearly it is not.

As I said, I continue to enjoy the suit you made for me. I have noted in previous posts that it is different from other things that I own. I wrote in my original article here that the suit you were wearing had a distinctive silhouette.

Your mistake is to think that this article is about you. It is not. It is about the Young Tailors Symposium, and how it compares to last year's symposium of older tailors.
post #33 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

But the most striking thing about the assembled coats was that the borders of the various tailoring traditions seem to have blurred. Whereas the six coats of the senior tailors at last year’s symposium could be associated with their makers immediately, the coats by the young tailors would be harder to place. And not only because these tailors have not yet achieved the renown of the older generation. For instance, Eithen Sweet’s double breasted dinner jacket features a spalla camicia with waterfall shoulders. It’s a design choice that befits the softness of the fabric and cut, but not one typical of Savile Row tailoring.


Double-breasted dinner jacket by Eithen Sweet of Thom Sweeney.


Just to reiterate that I don't view this blurring of the boundaries between styles as a bad thing, and because I don't want readers to think that I didn't like the other jackets there, here's what I wrote about this DB dinner jacket by Eithen Sweet of Thom Sweeney. I like the decision to do this relaxed, more casual dinner jacket with a spalla camicia. I asked for a spalla camicia on a recent DB dinner jacket I had made, and am happy with the result. But many older English tailors might not be willing to do that, or at least not unless it's a very good customer asking. It's not that spalla camicia is unheard of on Savile Row - you can find examples of it going back decades. But it's not standard, and I would be surprised if an older English tailor decided to bring a spalla camicia jacket as a sample to an exposition like this one.

Maybe some readers put so much value on heritage and authenticity that my pointing out that the spalla camicia is more Italian than English sounds like a criticism. If you're one of those readers, maybe Eithen Sweet is not the right tailor for you. But if you're looking for a tailor that might experiment more with you, especially if you like tailoring elements that are popular on the Internet today, of which spalla camicia is one, Mr. Sweet is showing you that he is willing to do that, and is able to do it successfully.
post #34 of 34
I like the way you do three button peak lapel @Musella
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