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Cars on the Street in Tokyo - Page 3

post #31 of 365
It makes more sense when you're trying to pull out into traffic as the mirror can get a better shot of the next lane. Unfortunately, it looks ugly as sin.
post #32 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom View Post
The fender mount mirrors were a Japanese thing. They are positioned so that you can look throgh the windshield and see your blind spots, instead of turning your head. It actually works pretty well.
You don't need fender mounts to do that. Door-mounted mirrors can be adjusted so they cover your blind spots, too. For the (left-hand) driver's side, lean over to the left, not quite touching your head to the window glass, and adjust your left mirror until you can just barely see the edge of your car. For the right mirror, lean to the right until you're in the middle of the car, and adjust it out until you can barely see the right side of the car. Done correctly, a car exiting your central rear-view mirror will be entering one of your side mirrors. I still look over my shoulders though for smaller things like motorcyclists. --Andre
post #33 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by j View Post
It makes more sense when you're trying to pull out into traffic as the mirror can get a better shot of the next lane. Unfortunately, it looks ugly as sin.

I love fender mounts, especially on classic Japanese cars (would look great on your 510!)
post #34 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre Yew View Post
You don't need fender mounts to do that. Door-mounted mirrors can be adjusted so they cover your blind spots, too. For the (left-hand) driver's side, lean over to the left, not quite touching your head to the window glass, and adjust your left mirror until you can just barely see the edge of your car. For the right mirror, lean to the right until you're in the middle of the car, and adjust it out until you can barely see the right side of the car.

Done correctly, a car exiting your central rear-view mirror will be entering one of your side mirrors. I still look over my shoulders though for smaller things like motorcyclists.

--Andre

+1. For some people though, like my gf, they have some weird habit of having to see the body of their car all the time. They fully understand the benefits of having mirrors span out as far as possible, but for some reason they feel disconnected without being able to see their own car. Strange!
post #35 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
+1. For some people though, like my gf, they have some weird habit of having to see the body of their car all the time. They fully understand the benefits of having mirrors span out as far as possible, but for some reason they feel disconnected without being able to see their own car. Strange!
I keep the very edge of my car in both my side mirrors because I need it as a reference point to tell where the things in the mirror are relative to me. I head check religiously though, so I could lose both mirrors and be mostly fine anyway. I also noticed that I almost never use the right one, having gotten most of my early driving practice in cars with only a left one.

Anyway, more Tokyo cars! (Well, vehicles...)







post #36 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom View Post
Second to last picture, sweet vitz (hahaha)

Here are a few of my sightings

Pristine Z sitting in a garage near my fiance's old house in Den en Chofu

I love the 240.
post #37 of 365
Awesome thread

I saw some really nice cars in Jiyugaoka the other day but I didn't have my camera with me....

Also, if anyone is interested in seeing Japanese street racer type cars, they are quite plentiful in Chiba.
post #38 of 365
Nice photos. I'll have to carry my camera and take pics of cars in Walnut Creek...
post #39 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtmt View Post
Awesome thread

I saw some really nice cars in Jiyugaoka the other day but I didn't have my camera with me....

Also, if anyone is interested in seeing Japanese street racer type cars, they are quite plentiful in Chiba.

Thats because Chiba=Wangan zone
post #40 of 365
I too need to see some part of the car in my mirror.

But my left mirror has, on its furthest end, a part fo it which is built differently, (like a concave mirror or something), which basically covers everything you need to see. Its pretty sweet. When i drive other cars that dont have it i feel a bit lost.
post #41 of 365
j lives in Japan? Cool cars. Quattroporte and CLS are dead sexy, best looking sedans out there.
post #42 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by HomerJ View Post
j lives in Japan?

Cool cars. Quattroporte and CLS are dead sexy, best looking sedans out there.

J lives in Seattle, if I recall correctly he went to Japan on vacation.

Jon.
post #43 of 365
I never use the right-hand side mirror. In fact, I believe older cars didn't even have right-hand side mirrors, only the left-hand one--and sometimes that was just an option.

I particularly like the appearance of fender-mounts--you see them on MGs and Alfa Romeos as some of them didn't have factory side view mirrors.



Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom View Post

Some Citroen (seen in Daikanyama)

A Citroen SM.
post #44 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post



A Citroen SM.

It is not an SM, the SM is much better looking and has the plexiglass over the headlights extended over the licence plate that is inbetween the headlights, thus following and complementing the shape of the bonnet.
post #45 of 365
I like them on the Toyota Century.
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