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(What's the Story) Morning Glory: The Current State of Savile Row - Page 2

post #16 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsuperb View Post

Saville Row is a bit over priced given the exchange rate. I wonder what would happen if they lowered prices to increase the amount of demand for their product.

Lordsuperb you use a SR tailor. Let's hear about it.
post #17 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

Lordsuperb you use a SR tailor. Let's hear about it.

I think Steed is about as close as it gets to saville row from the tailors I've used. But under your definitions I don't think they are considered SR. I have used an American tailor based out of DC who trained at Gieves and Hawkes. After touring through SR this past winter I would say his style matches the GH models being represented in the store window. With that stated, he makes a nice suit with some stylistic details I could do without. The quality of construction is on par with Steed with the hand finishing being a bit more rustic.


I'll probably be making fewer items from here on out and stick to one tailor after moving to a 480 sq ft studio. But if money were no object and I had more space I would like to purchase a suit from Maurice Sedwell. But life is too short and I'd like to focus my money else where these days.
post #18 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

That is a beautiful suit.

---

In my limited experience, outside of SF, more people know about Savile Row than they do about Neapolitan tailoring.

You are probably correct.
post #19 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsuperb View Post

I think Steed is about as close as it gets to saville row from the tailors I've used. But under your definitions I don't think they are considered SR.

I didn't mean to draw a narrow circle around savile row. If you have space there and use the term in your marketing without anyone throwing a fit then it seems to me that you fit the bill. I suppose that one might argue that they don't have their staff there, but lots of houses use outworkers. Maybe there is something to be said for paying the high rent, but again I thought steed had physical space there. In any event, I'd be interested in hearing why one chooses steed over A&S in particular. Same price point, no? That choice in and of itself strikes me as saying something about the lions of the row. I've probably seen 20 people use steed on this board and one use A&S.
post #20 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

I didn't mean to draw a narrow circle around savile row. If you have space there and use the term in your marketing without anyone throwing a fit then it seems to me that you fit the bill. I suppose that one might argue that they don't have their staff there, but lots of houses use outworkers. Maybe there is something to be said for paying the high rent, but again I thought steed had physical space there. In any event, I'd be interested in hearing why one chooses steed over A&S in particular. Same price point, no? That choice in and of itself strikes me as saying something about the lions of the row. I've probably seen 20 people use steed on this board and one use A&S.

Ha, I was asking myself the same question after the first suit was less than ideal. I will give him credit though he was able to fix everything in the end. I decided to give Steed a go after using Paul Stuart Custom and finding tags that said "Union Made" and "MG." I thought I wanted the real thing and I wanted to scratch the itch to find out if a SR suit was better than a factory made suit. I was originally deciding between Steed, S. Hitchcock, and Karl Matthews. In the end I chose Steed because they traveled consistently to the DC area, were using real artisans, and S. Hitchcock was out of my price range. I believe Edwin stated that A&S is about 1200 pounds more than the price of their goods. This also swayed my decision in picking Steed:



The fit and styling of my Paul Stuart suits are what I consider AWESOME! I knew it wouldn't be an exact match to my Paul Stuart but the fit of vox's suit convinced me to give Steed a go. Although I will say I was a little discouraged by the images of Montesquieu and Slewfoot's fit pics. There were no hiccups at the baste fitting, but the finished suit had the shoulders taken in so much my deltoids were bursting out at the seems. Although we've had some hiccups I believe they have me sorted out now and Edwin has an understanding of how I like my clothes to fit:



I've made some tweaks on their house style to get close to the silhouette of my paul stuart. He's raised the chest, extended the shoulders, shortened the jacket, and built the skirt close to my hips to achieve a look I like. It took two commissions to get us there.

With that stated I'm not sure one SR house is better than the other. They each have their own style quirks that may or may not work with each customer.
Edited by lordsuperb - 6/19/16 at 7:32pm
post #21 of 95
Maurice Sedwell:





post #22 of 95
Thread Starter 
Here's Taub (all from his instagram and tumblr):






Pretty incredible. The most unique to me is flat, set-in shoulder in the first pick. Those sleeves are so narrow and the armholes incredibly high. To me that looks incredibly natural. The silk double breasted screams "Edward Sexton", but on closer view you see the unique details like the double dart. And the unlined version in the last pick doesn't look like anything else that I've ever seen from Savile Row. Would love to see some suits on clients.
post #23 of 95
Based on the Taub photos, I would say that being in good physical condition is a key component to looking good in tailoring of any level or price.
post #24 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vida View Post

Based on the Taub photos, I would say that being in good physical condition is a key component to looking good in tailoring of any level or price.

Oh, I'm not sure about that. Certainly a great physique helps give an hourglass silhouette, but I don't think that is the only way to look good in tailored clothing. These guys look pretty good to my eye:


post #25 of 95
The entire point of tailoring is to resolve what is real with what is ideal.

Imo those taub silhouettes strike me as remarkably feminine. Maybe im alone in that?
post #26 of 95
Yep, they look nice in their tailoring but they also look portly. Drop the stomach and they would look even better!
post #27 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by double00 View Post

The entire point of tailoring is to resolve what is real with what is ideal.

Imo those taub silhouettes strike me as remarkably feminine. Maybe im alone in that?

I think that the Taub silhouette (particularly the pagoda shoulder with the high roping) draws mixed reactions. He uses that style in women's tailoring as well so I think it certainly can be though of as feminine. Undoubtedly those who select it have done so out of a desire to wear that style and they like it, which is good enough for me, but I note that the effect might be a little subtler on a person than those shots on the peg:


post #28 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by double00 View Post

The entire point of tailoring is to resolve what is real with what is ideal.

Imo those taub silhouettes strike me as remarkably feminine. Maybe im alone in that?

I think I see what you mean. Compare the Taub overcoat with this one, which I believe is from Huntsman:

post #29 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

I think that the Taub silhouette (particularly the pagoda shoulder with the high roping) draws mixed reactions. He uses that style in women's tailoring as well so I think it certainly can be though of as feminine. Undoubtedly those who select it have done so out of a desire to wear that style and they like it, which is good enough for me, but I note that the effect might be a little subtler on a person than those shots on the peg:



The styling is similar to your cifonelli. What do you hope to achieve by using G&H?
post #30 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsuperb View Post

The styling is similar to your cifonelli. What do you hope to achieve by using G&H?

I just admire his work.
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