or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › East Sicily Tailors
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

East Sicily Tailors - Page 6

post #76 of 362
Thread Starter 
It warmed up this weekend so no flannel. I did wear the fresco jacket though. Here's a few pics. I know the quality of them isn't the best but it'll give you an idea of the lines and structure of the jacket.


post #77 of 362
The coat has quite a bit of drape. It's closer to what I get from Steed vs NSM or Formosa.
post #78 of 362
Thread Starter 
Now that you mention it, my NSM jackets are cut a little leaner in the chest.
post #79 of 362
That's a lot of drape. Perhaps even more than old school A&S.

Urban Comp, have you ever tried a jacket with a more structured shoulder? That might be a good look for your build.
post #80 of 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanComposition View Post

It warmed up this weekend so no flannel. I did wear the fresco jacket though. Here's a few pics. I know the quality of them isn't the best but it'll give you an idea of the lines and structure of the jacket.



is this considered 3r2.5 or a 3 button?
post #81 of 362
That does seem like a lot of drape.

Cut looks a lot curvier than Steed or Paone, who have a more X-shaped opening.






Maybe a little more like Liverano in that regard, although the overall silhouette doesn't seem as rounded. Not sure what it is. I'd be curious to see what the coat looks like with the lapels re-pressed to a true 3r2.

UC, if you're daring, you could do this at home with a hot iron (and a bit of care). Although, it might also just naturally relax to a 3r2 over time.
post #82 of 362
Thread Starter 
The button stance is my fault; I asked for a three button jacket but didn't specifically clarify I wanted it to roll to the second button, which they call "tre bottoni finto" (at least in that part of Sicily). He pressed it a bit to roll to a 2.5, and I'm happy with it. Anyway, it's a good excuse to get another jacket.

I'm ambivalent towards a more structured shoulder; it has its place. The DB has a slight rollino at the shoulder which looks quite nice. If anything I'd ask for a more extended shoulder, about 1cm.
post #83 of 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

That does seem like a lot of drape.

Cut looks a lot curvier than Steed or Paone, who have a more X-shaped opening.


This is not a typical of steed's house style.
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanComposition View Post

The button stance is my fault; I asked for a three button jacket but didn't specifically clarify I wanted it to roll to the second button, which they call "tre bottoni finto" (at least in that part of Sicily). He pressed it a bit to roll to a 2.5, and I'm happy with it. Anyway, it's a good excuse to get another jacket.

I like the styling of the 3 r 2.5. Please buy more!
post #84 of 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsuperb View Post

This is not a typical of steed's house style.

You mean the x-shaped front? That's not been my experience. IMO this is pretty representative of what I've seen from them (slightly more open quarters here, but the x-shape pretty much the same)

post #85 of 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

You mean the x-shaped front? That's not been my experience. IMO this is pretty representative of what I've seen from them (slightly more open quarters here, but the x-shape pretty much the same)


Sorry, I meant the chest and skirt of vox's jacket. The picture you just posted with the chest drape is very similar to the sicilian jacket.
post #86 of 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsuperb View Post

Sorry, I meant the chest and skirt of vox's jacket. The picture you just posted with the chest drape is very similar to the sicilian jacket.

I think we might be talking about different things. Vox's jackets are a little less drapey than what Steed normally cuts, yes. But the big difference between the three jackets for me is the shape of the fronts. The Steed and Paone angle outwards at the buttoning point, forming an X. The Arrigo is curvier.

You can get a jacket from Steed with a more closed quarter, which would negate that effect (so more Y than X), but if you ask for open quarters, you'll essentially get that X-front shaping.
Edited by dieworkwear - 6/12/16 at 8:40pm
post #87 of 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


I think we might be talking about different things. Vox's jackets are a little less drapey than what Steed normally cuts, yes. But the big difference between the three jackets for me is the shape of the fronts. The Steed and Paone angle outwards at the buttoning point, forming an X. The Arrigo is curvier.

You can get a jacket from Steed with a more closed quarter, which would negate that effect (so more Y than X), but if you ask for open quarters, you'll essentially get that X-front shaping.

That's a very good interpretation (and maybe even the 1st time I heard of it) of what open quarter really is. 

 

Without seeing the Liverano, people imagine "open quarter" as just X, but it is really the overall round / curve that create the "open quarter" feel

post #88 of 362

Personally i prefer curved fronts. The issue with Steed type opening is if you want your front open then X creates issue especially close to buttoning point where it's not overlapping and sometime belt or pants waist is visible (as we can see from check jacket above). If you want to avoid this issue you should get Y type opening which to me not very elegant.

post #89 of 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by hippotamus View Post

That's a very good interpretation (and maybe even the 1st time I heard of it) of what open quarter really is. 

Without seeing the Liverano, people imagine "open quarter" as just X, but it is really the overall round / curve that create the "open quarter" feel

Tailors use a different term, but the word "quarters" is really just a colloquialism for the opening below the buttoning point. So, open quarters is when the jacket sweeps back towards the hips. That's true whether the front is X- or )(-shaped.

This is an extreme example, and not very representative of Liverano's cut since it's still at a fitting, but this shows the curviness of his quarters



Here's a finished Liverano coat on @jolinlovesjunya



The thing that makes these look nice, however, isn't just the shape of the quarters, it's the overall roundness of the silhouette. The lapels are almost concave, forming a )(-shaped curve from the lapel to the hem, the jacket is slightly shorter, and shoulders are sloped. IMO, that's what people miss when they bring photos of Liverano jackets to their tailor and say "make the quarters open like this." Feels like a lot of people on this board try to crowbar Liverano quarters into their non-Liverano suits, and it always looks bad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dfoverdx View Post

Personally i prefer curved fronts. The issue with Steed type opening is if you want your front open then X creates issue especially close to buttoning point where it's not overlapping and sometime belt or pants waist is visible (as we can see from check jacket above). If you want to avoid this issue you should get Y type opening which to me not very elegant.

That hasn't been my experience. A couple of my NSM jackets have slightly more rounded quarters, and they show a little more of the waistband. My Steeds are x-shaped, and they don't. I find it's less about the shape of the quarters and more about how open they make it (along with how high are your trousers). There's also how quickly the quarters cut away below the buttoning point.

Here we see @gusvs in a Liverano suit. He's always well-dressed, but this shows a Liverano jacket with very open quarters, which exposes the tie and waistband.



Here's a more conservative Liverano suit, which doesn't.



Here's an x-shaped Steed, which also doesn't show anything.



@mafoofan's x-shaped Rubinacci



And @whnay.'s Rubi, which also doesn't show anything.


Quote:
Originally Posted by dfoverdx View Post

sometime belt or pants waist is visible (as we can see from check jacket above).

Probably worth noting that the reason why you see a bit of the belt is because the camera is angled upwards. Here's the same jacket straight-on


Edited by dieworkwear - 6/13/16 at 7:15am
post #90 of 362
What you refer to as the more conservative Liverano is a thing a beauty. Prefer that over the Steed example and even the Rubinacci (and I have suits from R so I should be biased).

Couple of other things. The term quarters is an Igent term. Most tailors unless they are message board savvy won't know what you are talking about.

I have seen a couple of instances where a young customer brings his internet photos to a tailor and says he wants something done a certain way. The tailor's reaction is always cringeworthy. Hence, the difficulty in fitting elements of a Liverano into another tailor's house style.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › East Sicily Tailors