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post #46 of 88
I just liquidated a majority of my stocks.
post #47 of 88
I love this thread.
I don't see how it's not completely obvious that traditional retail does not work when run like a tech company.
Yet that doesn't stop companies from applying tech's strategies to traditional retail, hence why we've seen so many high profile retailers open, grow, then close or downsize all within 2 or 3 years.
Edited by kiya - 5/31/16 at 9:38pm
post #48 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiya View Post

I love this thread.
I don't see how it's not completely obvious that traditional retail does not work when run like a tech company.
Yet that doesn't stop companies from applying tech's strategies to traditional retail, hence why we've seen so many high profile retailers open, grow, then close or downsize all within 2 or 3 years.

It's called hubris.  

post #49 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiya View Post

I love this thread.
I don't see how it's not completely obvious that traditional retail does not work when run like a tech company.
Yet that doesn't stop companies from applying tech's strategies to traditional retail, hence why we've seen so many high profile retailers open, grow, then close or downsize all within 2 or 3 years.

Agreed
post #50 of 88
The market for these boutique menswear stores might be starting to get saturated. Many of them seem to be selling the same brands and items as each other which makes it hard for them to differentiate themselves other then price. Even looking at the affiliates on this site it's stores that put effort into mixing in more unique offerings like NMWA or ones that sell house branded goods like Kent Wang that manage to keep my interest for any extended period of time.

Add in the fact that there are people who prefer being able to try on clothing in person before buying and the market for these online menswear stores may not be growing fast enough to sustain all these new retailers. It's a similar bubble to what will eventually happen to online direct to consumer mattress companies like Casper. Just a little over a year ago there was only a small handful of them, now it's exploding with new options. Many of these will eventually fail.
post #51 of 88
The question is: when?

US jobs market data Friday sent the dollar into a tailspin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

The market for these boutique menswear stores might be starting to get saturated. Many of them seem to be selling the same brands and items as each other which makes it hard for them to differentiate themselves other then price. Even looking at the affiliates on this site it's stores that put effort into mixing in more unique offerings like NMWA or ones that sell house branded goods like Kent Wang that manage to keep my interest for any extended period of time.

Add in the fact that there are people who prefer being able to try on clothing in person before buying and the market for these online menswear stores may not be growing fast enough to sustain all these new retailers. It's a similar bubble to what will eventually happen to online direct to consumer mattress companies like Casper. Just a little over a year ago there was only a small handful of them, now it's exploding with new options. Many of these will eventually fail.
post #52 of 88
I like him about as much as I do Keurig , but the K man is talking numbers before launching into the usual...
Quote:
Friday’s employment report was a major disappointment: only 38,000 jobs added, a big step down from the more than 200,000 a month average since January 2013. Special factors, notably the Verizon strike, explain part of the bad news, and in any case job growth is a noisy series, so you shouldn’t make too much of one month’s data. Still, all the evidence points to slowing growth. It’s not a recession, at least not yet, but it is definitely a pause in the economy’s progress.

Should this pause worry you? Yes. Because if it does turn into a recession, or even if it goes on for a long time, it’s very hard to envision an effective policy response.

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/06/06/opinion/a-pause-that-distresses.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=0&referer=
post #53 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

I like him about as much as I do Keurig , but the K man is talking numbers before launching into the usual...
http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/06/06/opinion/a-pause-that-distresses.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=0&referer=

I mean, at this point, is there any sane person who doesn't think that we are in for a slowdown?

post #54 of 88
Sports Authority going under affected Nike/UA stock. Best Buy having problems (and their CFO leaving IIRC) and other big box retailers too. I haven't stepped foot inside any of those stores in several years, so shrug. The Bay Area is probably not the driving force behind those places anyway.
post #55 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I mean, at this point, is there any sane person who doesn't think that we are in for a slowdown?

A better question would be "did we ever actually recover?" I'd say not, and most of the gains we've had disappear the second that easy money stops getting pump in to the economy. Our debt approaches $20T, that can isn't going to get kicked forever.
post #56 of 88
Stock Market about to hit 18,000 again with Yellen not talking about a rate hike.
post #57 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyc wid it View Post

Sports Authority going under affected Nike/UA stock. Best Buy having problems (and their CFO leaving IIRC) and other big box retailers too. I haven't stepped foot inside any of those stores in several years, so shrug. The Bay Area is probably not the driving force behind those places anyway.

Not sure if Best Buy having issues can be used as any indicator for the overall health of the economy. It's really down to online retailers like Amazon there.
post #58 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyc wid it View Post

Sports Authority going under affected Nike/UA stock. Best Buy having problems (and their CFO leaving IIRC) and other big box retailers too. I haven't stepped foot inside any of those stores in several years, so shrug. The Bay Area is probably not the driving force behind those places anyway.

I think that both of those are good stocks to buy, incidentally.  Underarmor, in particular, has such a lot of room for growth, particular outside of the south.  The clothing is still very much "white trash" or just southern favored, but the fact that their compression gear is so widely used suggests that they can have a much broader appeal.  And Sports Authority is a temporary set back for both companies.

post #59 of 88
Thread Starter 
UA is also starting to eat Adidas' lunch in the college apparel market. They're pretty clearly moving into #2 (behind Nike, obviously).
post #60 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

Not sure if Best Buy having issues can be used as any indicator for the overall health of the economy. It's really down to online retailers like Amazon there.

I would agree. There's 0 reason for me to visit any big box retailer, except some of the furniture stores and Costco (if you consider those big box). UA making big moves outside of just Stephen Curry too in other sports.
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