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Pitti Uomo

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hello Style Forum,

 

I am a new member. This June will be my first Pitti Uomo. I was hoping to get advice from you guys about Florence, and about Pitti. What should do? Where should go? Anything I can't miss?

 

Thanks,

 

Charles Goyer

post #2 of 18

What are you going to Pitti for? As a buyer? Blogger? I've been there a few times but try to avoid the Summer as the heat is Indescribable.

 

Florence is a beautiful place, I look forward to going back as soon as I leave!

 

Simon Crompton has a shopping guide here: http://www.permanentstyle.co.uk/2016/04/florence-a-sartorial-shopping-guide.html and if you do a search on the forum, I'm sure you'll find plenty of first hand recommendations.

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice. I'm going as a buyer. I'm a Savile Row trained tailor starting a business in Los Angeles. 

 

What does Affiliate Vendor mean under your name?  You're in London? I'll be there in July doing an advanced cutting course at Maurice Sedwell.

post #4 of 18

Food, you can't miss the food, though I think that that goes without saying.  In terms of shopping, for a tailor, particularly, I would make sure to visit Liverano&Liverano (http://liverano.com/en), for sure.  I suppose that the other place everyone goes is Frasi (http://www.simonerighi.it/site/), Simone Righi's shop.  I personally really like PNP (http://pnp-firenze.com/wp/product-category/man/), but that type of clothing is probably not your bag.

 

We should also have a city map for Florence with shopping destinations before July up on the site, so look for that as well.

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 


Thanks LA Guy.

I like PNP a lot. I can't pull off that look, but I appreciate it. I got to go to a Rick Owens men's wear show, and it was one of the coolest things I've ever seen.

post #6 of 18
Sorry to derail the discussion, but I made a mistake and clicked on that PNP link. Someone actually pays that kind of money to look like homeless person?
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlesGoyer View Post
 

Thanks for the advice. I'm going as a buyer. I'm a Savile Row trained tailor starting a business in Los Angeles. 

 

What does Affiliate Vendor mean under your name?  You're in London? I'll be there in July doing an advanced cutting course at Maurice Sedwell.

 

Affiliate Vendor means I pay to advertise my business on the forum. Yes, my shop is based in London.

 

With regard to Pitti, it's a great opportunity to meet with the makers and owners of the brands. Make sure to check out various outside events as well, Simon Crompton has something as do the Swedish guys behind Plaza Uomo magazine.

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post

Sorry to derail the discussion, but I made a mistake and clicked on that PNP link. Someone actually pays that kind of money to look like homeless person?

 

£1200 for a pair of boots to make you look like Oliver Twist is the ultimate in hipster irony.

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post

Sorry to derail the discussion, but I made a mistake and clicked on that PNP link. Someone actually pays that kind of money to look like homeless person?
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaggedyDandy View Post

 

£1200 for a pair of boots to make you look like Oliver Twist is the ultimate in hipster irony.

I like the leather jackets, leather goods, and some of the footwear.  There are simply interesting leather treatments that cannot be found anywhere else.  For me. the strength of the style is in the experimentation with leather and textiles.

 

You are not completely incorrect about the "homeless" part - a lot of the designers are influenced by the arte povera movement.  The clothes are decidedly not "poor" in anyway though, unless you see them in person, and insistat that incredibly complex textiles and leather are poor.

 

There is actually very little irony in the clothing.  In fact, the lack of humor is one of the things that annoys me about the style.

 

I suppose that if you wish to have a completely closed mind about things, there is no point in going further, but there is a lot of merit in many of those designers.  There is also a lot of garbage and miscues, but that goes for pretty much any style. classic or contemporary. 

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I like the leather jackets, leather goods, and some of the footwear.  There are simply interesting leather treatments that cannot be found anywhere else.  For me. the strength of the style is in the experimentation with leather and textiles.

You are not completely incorrect about the "homeless" part - a lot of the designers are influenced by the arte povera movement.  The clothes are decidedly not "poor" in anyway though, unless you see them in person, and insistat that incredibly complex textiles and leather are poor.

There is actually very little irony in the clothing.  In fact, the lack of humor is one of the things that annoys me about the style.

I suppose that if you wish to have a completely closed mind about things, there is no point in going further, but there is a lot of merit in many of those designers.  There is also a lot of garbage and miscues, but that goes for pretty much any style. classic or contemporary. 

I understand... Look, I was once playing in a punk band, when I was in high school. We were serious missfits... Ripped jeans, pierced leather jackets... The difference was, we were either ripping out own jeans, or they would just get ripped from wear, we were buying clothes from second hand stores, army surpluses (with used army stuff) etc. I can only say that someone who has to spend $$$ to achieve that effect has no style, period!
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post

I understand... Look, I was once playing in a punk band, when I was in high school. We were serious missfits... Ripped jeans, pierced leather jackets... The difference was, we were either ripping out own jeans, or they would just get ripped from wear, we were buying clothes from second hand stores, army surpluses (with used army stuff) etc. I can only say that someone who has to spend $$$ to achieve that effect has no style, period!

I think that that is a silly distinction.  First of all, the look is not really punk inspired, and second, frankly not achievable using DIY methods.  You'll see very little in the way of ripped jeans and studded leathers. Saint Laurent Paris is closer to that.  If you know someone who can process leather the way that Guidi's tanneries can in their garage, then they could have a serious career in fashion.

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I think that that is a silly distinction.  First of all, the look is not really punk inspired, and second, frankly not achievable using DIY methods.  You'll see very little in the way of ripped jeans and studded leathers. Saint Laurent Paris is closer to that.  If you know someone who can process leather the way that Guidi's tanneries can in their garage, then they could have a serious career in fashion.

I wasn't saying that this is punk inspired look. I was simply saying that it is ultimately non-stylish to try to look like you're homeless, or like you don't care by actually spending $$$$.

If one wants to make a statement, then he can ask homeless man to sell him some of his clothes or something to that effect.

I can understand that this requires fine craftsmanship, but that is besides the point. Product is ugly.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post

I can understand that this requires fine craftsmanship, but that is besides the point. Product is ugly.

I would disagree strongly with you that the product is ugly.  Perhaps not to your taste, but it's certainly not ugly.  In fact, I would say that, to the contrary, it's really quite beautiful, though definitely not in the same way that a suit or a pair of bespoke dress boots are.  Have you ever seen the product in person?  There is a reason that Guidi leather is sought after by so many designers and makers.  The leather alone is very unique and striking.

 

fwiw, I appreciate a variety of aesthetics, and variety, in general.

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I would disagree strongly with you that the product is ugly.  Perhaps not to your taste, but it's certainly not ugly.  In fact, I would say that, to the contrary, it's really quite beautiful, though definitely not in the same way that a suit or a pair of bespoke dress boots are.  Have you ever seen the product in person?  There is a reason that Guidi leather is sought after by so many designers and makers.  The leather alone is very unique and striking.

fwiw, I appreciate a variety of aesthetics, and variety, in general.

OK, I admit Ive never seen it in person. It is impossible to judge leather by the web pictures. I believe you when you say this is the best quality there is. But the styling of those "Charlie Chaplin" boots... C'mon!

Or these 1000 EUR pants:
http://pnp-firenze.com/wp/product/a1923-loose-fit-pants/

But then again, no point in discussing tastes
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post


OK, I admit Ive never seen it in person. It is impossible to judge leather by the web pictures. I believe you when you say this is the best quality there is. But the styling of those "Charlie Chaplin" boots... C'mon!

Or these 1000 EUR pants:
http://pnp-firenze.com/wp/product/a1923-loose-fit-pants/

But then again, no point in discussing tastes

I think that there is a point in discussing tastes, but it requires an open mind to a variety of aesthetics.  I've had this mirror conversation on the SWD side of the forum, where boots by the likes of Edward Green and John Lobb are widely blasted for being "boring and lifeless".  I think that both of these opinions are groundless.

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