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Blast from the past,or Is never too late.

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Well,maybe is a bit late for a advice.,,but,,oh well for some things is never to late.

The year is 1945,and this man is buying a new suit from Neiman.Marcus department store in Dallas,

What do you think about?

What is wrong,what is right,how can be adjust and altered?

Some tips for this guy.

 

 

post #2 of 10
Paging member @GBR
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post

Paging member @GBR

Your wish is granted.

Yes, burning it would be a substantial improvement on what we see here.
post #4 of 10
This comment has been made before, but deserves repetition;
How, little menswear style has changed in 70 years. Replace the tie
and the NM customer' s clothing would look relatively contemporary.
Compare 1845 to 1916 and one sees vastly different styles.
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by carpu65 View Post

The year is 1945,and this man is buying a new suit from Neiman.Marcus department store in Dallas,

Were the lapels a little different, I could probably get away with wearing that suit today. Admittedly, I prefer the fuller, more traditional fit illustrated.

Yeah, the suit jacket length is - by modern day standards - a trifle long for the man pictured. But by the standards of his era, it was perfectly acceptable.

It's worth noting that material shortages, manpower shortages, War Board restrictions on various details of men's clothing, price controls on clothing (lifted on 18 August 1945), and various other consequences of World War II meant that a good quality new suit was far more of a luxury in 1945, than it had been during the pre-war years, or would be by the late '40s. (That's for the US. In various other countries - not excluding victorious ones - post-WWII rationing and shortages continued well into the late 1950s.)

I can't tell much about the material quality of the suit, from the picture provided. Although it's worth noting that it's probably of a heavier wool than would be common today. And it might well have been blended with rayon - "synthetics" tended to be regarded favorably, in stark contrast to the reputation they would subsequently acquire.

My guess is that some 60 year old Neiman Marcus tailor, in 1945, had forgotten more about suit alterations than today's typical "alterations guy at the local dry cleaners, who cuffs my pants and shortens the jacket sleeves" will ever learn. Similarly, the suit salesman at Neiman Marcus likely understood enormously more about how a suit should look and fit, than does the typical department store salesman, today. (Many of those salesmen reasonably regarded being a suit salesman at NM as a lifetime career. And not necessarily an awful one, either.)
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 

Seems a good flannel suit.

My impression is that the quality of this suit can be high for the standard of today.

The suit is certainly fully cavanassed (glue for suit not exist in 1945).

In my opinion shoulder are too much wide and long,they must be tighten and shortened.

I don't see if the coart is darted or undarted,but seems not a sack (we are in Texas and in 1945,before the Ivy league fashion trend).

So i think that the coat need more waist suppression.

I don't like these "pleats" at the side of the chest; ok this is "drape",but the curling is too much and must be corrected.

The back of the coat is very clean.

Lenght and widht of the trousers is excellent in my opinion.

Im sure that in 1945 Neiman-Marcus had  good alteration tailors for fit the suit.

 

I suggest a different tie,also if is 1945.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post


post-WWII rationing and shortages continued well into the late 1950s.

 

In Italy for most of  goods, rationing ended august 9 1948,and completely ended august 1 1949.

http://siusa.archivi.beniculturali.it/cgi-bin/pagina.pl?TipoPag=prodente&Chiave=29115

But from the end of the war was never strict and severe as in UK.

https://books.google.it/books?id=QrC0VRlYaQgC&pg=PT14&lpg=PT14&dq=fine+del+razionamento+in+italia++1949&source=bl&ots=u_OA6F40vl&sig=fUwKkN8D49USTNqTijtsbv5oRD4&hl=it&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjm1uHto-vLAhWKOxoKHRxECiUQ6AEIbDAP#v=onepage&q=fine%20del%20razionamento%20in%20italia%20%201949&f=false

I think that in USA rationing ended before.

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by carpu65 View Post

In Italy for most of  goods, rationing ended august 9 1948,and completely ended august 1 1949.
Of course, just because there's a formal end to government rationing, doesn't mean that industries instantly recover, shortages immediately end, and wealth is completely restored.
Quote:
But from the end of the war was never strict and severe as in UK.
The UK was virtually bankrupt by the end of World War II, and immediately after the war, UK exports - which brought in the money needed to import food, among other necessities - were only a fraction of what they'd been in the late 1930's. Consequently, rationing continued well into the 1950s.

Indeed, in some ways, post-war rationing was actually more restrictive than rationing during the war. Bread and potatoes weren't rationed during the war, but were for a time after the war.

Clothing was rationed in the UK until May 1949.
Quote:
I think that in USA rationing ended before.
The US came out of World War II in far better shape than most other countries, and the consumer economy rebounded accordingly. Which isn't to suggest that converting from the wartime economy to a peacetime economy happened perfectly smoothly or instantly.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

US in 40s were a real fairyland for a European eye.

Exist a interesting documentary on the Italian prisoners of war in USA that is called:"Prisoners in paradise",and this said all.

From 1945-1946 the US recovery was barely instantly.

About Italy i'm ever amazed that in 1949 the Italian GDP (gross domestic product) was 10% more that in 1939.

A real miracle due of Marshall plan,of the American loans and of Italian energy and creativity freed after so many years under the repressive fascist regime.

Is a paradox.but in Italy in late 40s there was a popular sayng:"luckily we have lost the war".

Free from huge military spending,free from the costs of a colonial empire,without the debts of many winners and generously funded by dear uncle Sam.

More that was a real great generation; Italians of today are neither the half smart as the Italians of 1950.

Neither half of the half.

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by carpu65 View Post

Is a paradox.but in Italy in late 40s there was a popular sayng:"luckily we have lost the war".
This was a fairly popular meme of the time (long before "meme" entered the lexicon). That the best - or at least most economically advantageous - thing that could happen to a country was to lose a war to the United States.

The idea is nicely illustrated (if in a tongue-in-cheek fashion) in Leonard Wibberley's 1955 novel, "The Mouse That Roared" (which led to several sequels, and various radio, television, stage, and film adaptations, the most well known of which being the 1959 movie, starring Peter Sellers).

It's a lovely piece of Cold War satire. I can recommend the book, and the movie is a real treat for Peter Sellers fans.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

The Duchy of Grand Fenwick!!

Great movie!

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