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Different approaches to developing your wardrobe and buying clothes

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirty Denim View Post

MOK you have so many great pieces.  I can only imagine what your closet(s) look like.  

Actually, that's a good question. Do some of you have large wardrobes, or do you sell whatever pieces you don't wear anymore?
post #2 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Huh? View Post

Actually, that's a good question. Do some of you have large wardrobes, or do you sell whatever pieces you don't wear anymore?
I generally sell things off that I don't wear, usually with just the occasional regret. I've limited myself to half of the walk-in closet, which isn't that big. Lately, it's more like 65% of the closet, and I'm hoping my wife doesn't notice too much. I can't go any farther, though...
Quote:
Originally Posted by t3hg0suazn View Post

I think I like Stanley's fit because everything pairs really well with the wall.
SVB is great at wall pairing.
post #3 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Huh? View Post


Actually, that's a good question. Do some of you have large wardrobes, or do you sell whatever pieces you don't wear anymore?

 

I give stuff away to friends/acquaintances if I don't/can't wear it anymore.  Basically anybody I know that can fit a piece and will really appreciate it.  I prefer seeing it go to a good home than getting dumped in some donation bin, plus I don't want to bother with potential scammers/lowballers in listings.

post #4 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Huh? View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirty Denim View Post

MOK you have so many great pieces.  I can only imagine what your closet(s) look like.  

Actually, that's a good question. Do some of you have large wardrobes, or do you sell whatever pieces you don't wear anymore?

 

We need a separate thread for this, don't we?

 

This is always a topic that I find interesting. There are several approaches, or rather, a range of approaches, I suppose, from ultra-minimal Zuckerberg approach to the full KitonBrioni (guy had extra rooms full of clothes).

 

Lately I've been trying to maintain a one-in, one-out policy in my wardrobe and a goal of slimming down overall, wherever possible. I've sold off some stuff, and donates a bunch more that wouldn't be worth the trouble.

 

And in theory, I would like to go ultra-minimal, but it's really tough. I could have a closet full of white shirts but at some point I'm going to see a blue one that I really like. And that's at an extreme end that I'm not close to. That said, I have, over the last couple years, pared down to the point where most of my shirts are white dress shirts, blue oxfords, or navy polos. There are other things that are firmly established as "here for good," like I don't think there is ever going to be a better winter sweater than my SNS Herning charcoal grey Stark. So I can check that off my list, and any time I see an awesome thick knit, I can remind myself that I already have the best thing for that need and I don't need another.

 

But then I see all of MoK's fits, and clearly he is kopping a ton of stuff, which leads to a good amount of experimentation. Lots of it is good, I think, with a few misfires here and there, but on balance, it seems like he is doing interesting things and getting enjoyment out of it. For me to do that, I feel like I would end up selling stuff all the time though, since I'm so averse to accumulation. And at that point, I'd be taking quite a hit on the value of everything, so I'm hesitant to take up that approach. In some ways I feel like I'm already at too high a turnover rate, but at least I'm not replacing my Stark.

 

Does this warrant further discussion or is this only interesting to the person talking?

post #5 of 37

Stanley, I'm with you. I'm pretty averse to accumulating too many pieces because I always remind myself that there's no way everything will get wear regularly. Even if I only have 14 sweaters (I have more than that at the moment and I'm trying to trim down) and wear a different one each day of the week on a two week rotation, one sweater will only see a couple of wears per year. The rest of the time it's just collecting dust and not in use, which to me is a waste.

post #6 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanleyVanBuren View Post
 

 

does this warrant further discussion or is this only interesting to the person talking?

 

I think this issue is strongly correlated to the Contendedness thread. How much stuff does one need/want, What stuff really makes you happy, etc.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kindofyoung View Post
 

Is there a SW&D interiour design/house/living space thread?
If not I feel like discussions like that could sort of fit in such a thread, along with plenty of other related things I'm sure lots of posters are interested in, like interior design related purchases, pics of your places, nice pics of wardrobe solutions etc etc.
(not that further discussions on it's own couldn't be interesting, but I don't know how long a thread with only that and nothing else would survive)

 

There is one in the General part of the forum, but sometimes it's scary out there past the walls of SW&D. 

 

I like interior design as much as fashion but talk about expensive.

post #7 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanleyVanBuren View Post

But then I see all of MoK's fits, and clearly he is kopping a ton of stuff, which leads to a good amount of experimentation.

Actually, I think that's what I'm most curious about. Some people, maybe even most people, buy a coat or jacket when they need it, and wear it until it's worn out, at which point they replace it. But then there are people such as MoK, and nicelynice, and Bene who seem to post a fit featuring a completely new piece of outerwear or clothing in almost every post. Ignoring the amount of clothing that begins to build up, I'm wondering if some of you sell those jackets or coats you don't wear any more not just as a way of saving space, but as a way of being able to afford to update your wardrobe so continuously? For those of you who are really passionate about clothing, I assume it pays to spend more on certain brands since there is a greater likelihood of you being able to resell it.
post #8 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Huh? View Post

Actually, I think that's what I'm most curious about. Some people, maybe even most people, buy a coat or jacket when they need it, and wear it until it's worn out, at which point they replace it. But then there are people such as MoK, and nicelynice, and Bene who seem to post a fit featuring a completely new piece of outerwear or clothing in almost every post. Ignoring the amount of clothing that begins to build up, I'm wondering if some of you sell those jackets or coats you don't wear any more not just as a way of saving space, but as a way of being able to afford to update your wardrobe so continuously? For those of you who are really passionate about clothing, I assume it pays to spend more on certain brands since there is a greater likelihood of you being able to resell it.

I enjoy experimentation, and sometimes it works better than others. I've probably got a big enough wardrobe that some pieces that I've not worn for a while look like new pieces, but I spend too much on clothes. Arguably I might be happier buying fewer dearer pieces, but the cost of a piece seems to bear little relationship to how much I like it. I don't tend to drop cash on really big ticket items - much as I might be tempted by a pair of Visvim Skagway for example I'll pick up a pair of converse and be able to but two EG jackets in the sales with the change... I don't have the expense of a car and I'm not into expensive holidays which helps. I've slowed down a bit on buys over the past few months and will probably slow down more as years go on, but I'm not great at avoiding temptation.
post #9 of 37
I vaguely remember the time when I wasn't that much into clothes and fashion. I had a handful of pants (mostly denim), shirts, sweaters, a few jackets and some pairs of shoes/boots and that was it. I bought new stuff when I needed it, because something was worn out or not in style anymore (whatever that meant). Then the fashion bug has bitten me. Like many of us here I check fashion/retailers sites on a regular basis and I love to find new stuff. I spend way too much money in clothes and have not enough space to store it. My closet is packed and clothes are all over my bedroom and some other rooms. It reached a point were I find it embarrassing myself. When people come over to my house and see the amount of clothes and shoes that I have I feel uncomfortable. Especially women find it suspect if a guy has more clothes and shoes than her. I'm sure a many people around me find it odd that I have such a large wardrobe and they probably think that I am gay or that I have a shopping addiction (which I'm sure I have to some degree). As hard as I try not to purchase something for a month or so, whenever I see something that I like and it's in my price range most of the time I can't stand the temptation. Sometimes I think it's not healthy anymore.
Edited by Wupper - 3/16/16 at 1:56am
post #10 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanleyVanBuren View Post

We need a separate thread for this, don't we?

This is always a topic that I find interesting. There are several approaches, or rather, a range of approaches, I suppose, from ultra-minimal Zuckerberg approach to the full KitonBrioni (guy had extra rooms full of clothes).

Lately I've been trying to maintain a one-in, one-out policy in my wardrobe and a goal of slimming down overall, wherever possible. I've sold off some stuff, and donates a bunch more that wouldn't be worth the trouble.

And in theory, I would like to go ultra-minimal, but it's really tough. I could have a closet full of white shirts but at some point I'm going to see a blue one that I really like. And that's at an extreme end that I'm not close to. That said, I have, over the last couple years, pared down to the point where most of my shirts are white dress shirts, blue oxfords, or navy polos. There are other things that are firmly established as "here for good," like I don't think there is ever going to be a better winter sweater than my SNS Herning charcoal grey Stark. So I can check that off my list, and any time I see an awesome thick knit, I can remind myself that I already have the best thing for that need and I don't need another.

But then I see all of MoK's fits, and clearly he is kopping a ton of stuff, which leads to a good amount of experimentation. Lots of it is good, I think, with a few misfires here and there, but on balance, it seems like he is doing interesting things and getting enjoyment out of it. For me to do that, I feel like I would end up selling stuff all the time though, since I'm so averse to accumulation. And at that point, I'd be taking quite a hit on the value of everything, so I'm hesitant to take up that approach. In some ways I feel like I'm already at too high a turnover rate, but at least I'm not replacing my Stark.

Does this warrant further discussion or is this only interesting to the person talking?

If it don't fit I don't keep it is my motto nowadays. I realized as much as I love a certain look or how nice it looks on display, if it doesn't fit me well OTR I am not keeping it. And depending on where I purchased from it may even mean axing a certain designer. I think once you find a brand that fits you well it slows down the whole process of having to buy the next thing, at least for me. I think part of the experimenting phase is nailing down fit, which for some like myself can take a heck of a lot longer than others. SVB does MTM/MTO it seems so I imagine it is easier to nail down fit that route and perhaps allows you to take a step back and see what is the next thing to update. Plus, that time of pause really is an effect of well fitting clothes that you can wear time and time again because you get much more enjoyment than what is cool but not the best fit.

I believe once you realize how A fits compared to B, C, D,...Z, you get a better idea of what to shop for instead of sporadically buying clothes. And i think it is why some here also stick to one designer because maybe the "house cut" is a great fit and the brand is smart enough to stick with it. I think designers have enough imagination to keep their clothes fresh without having to change the cut and pattern too much if at all, so, that sort of takes care of the risk of being boring.

Of course for me like many here who nerd about clothes, there are somethings in my closet that as much as I want to pair down my wardrobe I will not depart with simply because it looks great just hanging there. I may wear it once or twice out of the season but it does not bother me. And that belief goes back to fit because I know when I pull it out of my closet and put it on, it is going to look and feel nice. (I just love wearing long coats.) I think this idea can be applied to other clothing that we may not wear often but when we pull it out and put it on, it just feels great. After fit is wear your personal style can take a more controlled risk in terms of color, patterns, fabrics, shapes, etc.

I think if I had the patience, time and money I would go MTM or even bespoke. It would greatly help in having a minimal closet of staple shirts, jackets, pants and shoes. I get that there are enthusiasts but for the individuals who are really looking to minimize the amount of space clothes take up in their room, finding clothes that essentially fit you perfectly is time saved. In contrast, you have the potential accumulating things over time that you do not even remember buying! Alternatively, there is always making small compromises and picking up things as fillers until you learn of a new label that catches your attention and are willing to give it a try.

Another way of looking at it is after a while you end of up with a certain uniform. @LA Guy says he has a certain uniform and it is true because all I ever read about are projects that essentially updating and upgrading the same staple items that he wears. If you can commission someone to fit you with the same uniform with small variations and turnout enough for you to rotate between, why would you want anything else? And of course this approach is based on those who really want to minimize their wardrobe footprint and not for pretenders.

I like the 1-for-1 idea but again for me there are somethings that I am not willing to trade in so that I can justify my next purchase.

Personally I am still trying to discover labels that can fit me best, which is why I also just face the fact that until that time comes, I rather recycle through filler items than stock my closet full of clothes that feel sub par. I plan on making donations again soon or relegate clothes to home loungewear. Regarding that, does anyone keep their home loungewear in a separate closet? Do you ever think about whether the tired old sweater is looking back at you like 'why??' HAHA... frown.gif

@spacepope
This is cool, man. The smoothness of the leather in the shoulder and chest area in contrast to the dry undertone of the rest of the garments is slick and eerie and its giving me this sci-fi vibe. Maybe it's the lighting. I feel like i get it. The location, the way the clothes hang and the shape with the blurred face just adds to the effect. It looks really comfortable and cozy, too.

@cyc wid it
I think pants too tight. The taper is too much. Come to think of it, reminds me of pants worn by jockeys. Would probably look better with sneakers. Not sure how high the shaft is on the SLP boots (they're SLP right?) but it could be exaggerating the slimness since it is giving the knee down more of a straight line.
post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanleyVanBuren View Post

We need a separate thread for this, don't we?

This is always a topic that I find interesting. There are several approaches, or rather, a range of approaches, I suppose, from ultra-minimal Zuckerberg approach to the full KitonBrioni (guy had extra rooms full of clothes).

Lately I've been trying to maintain a one-in, one-out policy in my wardrobe and a goal of slimming down overall, wherever possible. I've sold off some stuff, and donates a bunch more that wouldn't be worth the trouble.

And in theory, I would like to go ultra-minimal, but it's really tough. I could have a closet full of white shirts but at some point I'm going to see a blue one that I really like. And that's at an extreme end that I'm not close to. That said, I have, over the last couple years, pared down to the point where most of my shirts are white dress shirts, blue oxfords, or navy polos. There are other things that are firmly established as "here for good," like I don't think there is ever going to be a better winter sweater than my SNS Herning charcoal grey Stark. So I can check that off my list, and any time I see an awesome thick knit, I can remind myself that I already have the best thing for that need and I don't need another.

But then I see all of MoK's fits, and clearly he is kopping a ton of stuff, which leads to a good amount of experimentation. Lots of it is good, I think, with a few misfires here and there, but on balance, it seems like he is doing interesting things and getting enjoyment out of it. For me to do that, I feel like I would end up selling stuff all the time though, since I'm so averse to accumulation. And at that point, I'd be taking quite a hit on the value of everything, so I'm hesitant to take up that approach. In some ways I feel like I'm already at too high a turnover rate, but at least I'm not replacing my Stark.

Does this warrant further discussion or is this only interesting to the person talking?

I sorta think that I'll break this and a few other posts into a separate thread. It's an idea that has come up a lot, and which I think merits it's own home. On the road right now, but will do later.
post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ManofKent View Post


I enjoy experimentation, and sometimes it works better than others. I've probably got a big enough wardrobe that some pieces that I've not worn for a while look like new pieces, but I spend too much on clothes. Arguably I might be happier buying fewer dearer pieces, but the cost of a piece seems to bear little relationship to how much I like it. I don't tend to drop cash on really big ticket items - much as I might be tempted by a pair of Visvim Skagway for example I'll pick up a pair of converse and be able to but two EG jackets in the sales with the change... I don't have the expense of a car and I'm not into expensive holidays which helps. I've slowed down a bit on buys over the past few months and will probably slow down more as years go on, but I'm not great at avoiding temptation.

 

I used to pay a lot of attention to society's norms and on the inside was condescending to ppl who deviated too much from the norm range (still too much of the former; less of the latter). I'd see/hear someone spending too much--or too little--on different expenditure categories, and I'd have some negative opinion: "He got a 6 figure job out of university and bought a Corolla; that guy doesn't know how to live." Or, "He spends that much on lunch every day; there are so many hungry people in the world."

 

The world is full of people trying to be normal and bland, and pressuring others to do the same. MoK likely has some primary life activity where he's being a useful human (i.e., a job helping others in some way). If his downtime hobby is buying clothes and looking kick ass, and he can afford that hobby (by working hard at his job or cutting back in other spending categories), more power to him. And if he takes photos of his hobby and shares them, we can all share in the pleasure. With all the Kapital, sometimes MoK makes me think of Porco Rosso (completely complimentary), and it brightens my day knowing there's an anime-looking character roaming the English countryside.

post #13 of 37
I've settled into a very slowly evolving wardrobe, but I also never sell anything. It is my history and feels to personal to give to some one else.
post #14 of 37
Does that same sentiment go for things you needed vs wanted?
post #15 of 37
After some earlier periods (say 5-8 years ago) of experimentation and buying a lot of clothes and shoes, I´ve developed this revulsion or shame, almost physical, towards having alot of clothes around that doesn't get regular wear, so I am practicing something like one (or three) in, one out. My goal is definitely to keep it relatively austere.

These days its pretty easy though, I mostly get selected pieces rather than "needing a new shirt" or whatever. Furthermore, I moved to Switzerland a year ago with just a couple of suitcases, which made me realize even more that its possible to be happy with a lower number of clothing items (still alot of things in Stockholm that I could get rid off though). I look very similar day to day, especially after realizing that a plain wool sweater in black goes with everything. Even though I like clothes, its somehow a relief to no having to think so much about what to wear in terms of combinations or specific outfits.
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