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Mens Wearhouse...an employee Q&A - Page 2

post #16 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viral View Post

LOL..........the responses would be completely different if you said you worked part-time at RL.

OP - nothing wrong with being confident in yourself and don't feel you need to bow to some internet strangers who are most judging you because of the brand you represent. Most people on this forum don't have much formal training or knowledge about clothes - we are all fans and hobbyists of this subject matter alike.

Like I said, if you substitute MW with any of the "SF approved" ones you would have been welcomed with open arms!

Good luck at MW!

Thank you! 

 

I appreciate it!

post #17 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viral View Post

LOL..........the responses would be completely different if you said you worked part-time at RL.

OP - nothing wrong with being confident in yourself and don't feel you need to bow to some internet strangers who are most judging you because of the brand you represent. Most people on this forum don't have much formal training or knowledge about clothes - we are all fans and hobbyists of this subject matter alike.

Like I said, if you substitute MW with any of the "SF approved" ones you would have been welcomed with open arms!

Good luck at MW!


Doesn't matter if he works at Kiton or Zegna or Brioni or Gap or Jcrew, but I sorta question how can he know menswear so much from a sales person standpoint at such a young age with such little experience. But obviously, he's passionate, done his research, put in effort, and he's confident which is all very good. To be fair, I'm sure there's a lot more about suiting that he could learn, myself included. I want to get into the tailoring aspect more but this isn't something generally taught.

 

But it's good that he put in the effort because learning how to sell isn't the same as product knowledge, so good for him.

post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by menswear2613 View Post


The Joseph Abboud MTM program is honestly one of the best values that MW offers. I have fitted a dozen or so clients for MTM garments, and all have come out looking awesome. Let me walk you through the process, and then I'll actually show you my flannel cashmere suit I made for myself.

1. Salesman takes the basic measurement, (over-arm, chest, waist, hips, ect) He will then try on a Joseph Abboud suit jacket on you (either modern or slim fit) and try to achieve the best fit in the shoulders. He will then measure any adjustments in the chest. Giving you more or less room. Salesman tend to give you more room then the best slim taper, but all alterations are FREE to a JA MTM, so when you get it, you can have the tailor do anything you like. No charge.

The salesmen then has you try on JA pants, and notes the size. Again, any adjustments (tapering) ect, are free when it comes in.

You choose your fabric, jacket and sleeve lining, and the style of coat and pants. No unfortunately you cannot choose the width of the lapels. I even called the shop to ask if they could make an employee exception, and they can't. You can also add extra details such as a ticket pocket and functioning buttonholes, which are 50 bucks extra. (I think it's nuts to do that to a customer but hey...I only work for them).

Adjustments can be made for a hunched/arched back, shoulders, large biceps, large thighs, ect.

Salespeople are truthfully trained in the basics. They can put a coat on you, do chest and sleeve adjustments, and pant adjustments, but very few know all the complicated adjustments. I spent a day in another state going to a regional training session, so I learned everything.

Construction quality is solid. All the suits are hand-made in the USA in MA, by American factory workers. The fabrics are super 120's-140s, with some luxury fabrics thrown in. All fabrics are from Europe, mostly from Italy, with a few from Spanish mills. The suit is amazingly comfortable. I am a hard body type to fit, and I created a grey and light blue windowpane flannel suit to serve as a fall/winter suit. I will attach a photo. The flannel is think and warm, and very durable. No cheap flannel that wrinkles.


Final: The value: All JA MTM suits, sportcoats and pants are always buy one, get one half. A suit starts at 795 for a range 1, super 120suit. So 2 suits for 1200. You pay 50% up front, 50 when you pick it up. All alterations are free for the life of the suit. Overall, to me, 600 for a MTM suit with 200+ Italian fabrics is a good value for someone getting their first MTM. Sport coats start at 495, so 2 for 750 or so. And pants start at 245, so 2 for 370 or so. I have done custom pants, and created a grey flannel pair, and a pretty cool brown and navy windowpane pair, which is nice to wear with a suitsupply navy sport coat in the fall.

Overall, I like the program. I love the suit I made, and I have had satisfied reviews from customers. I'll attach a photo of the suit I made. Thanks for your question!

 

So is JA MTM fully canvassed, or half canvassed? The answer to that question would then have bearing to the claims of the suits being "handmade".

post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by menswear2613 View Post

The Joseph Abboud MTM program is honestly one of the best values that MW offers. I have fitted a dozen or so clients for MTM garments, and all have come out looking awesome. Let me walk you through the process, and then I'll actually show you my flannel cashmere suit I made for myself.

1. Salesman takes the basic measurement, (over-arm, chest, waist, hips, ect) He will then try on a Joseph Abboud suit jacket on you (either modern or slim fit) and try to achieve the best fit in the shoulders. He will then measure any adjustments in the chest. Giving you more or less room. Salesman tend to give you more room then the best slim taper, but all alterations are FREE to a JA MTM, so when you get it, you can have the tailor do anything you like. No charge.

The salesmen then has you try on JA pants, and notes the size. Again, any adjustments (tapering) ect, are free when it comes in.

You choose your fabric, jacket and sleeve lining, and the style of coat and pants. No unfortunately you cannot choose the width of the lapels. I even called the shop to ask if they could make an employee exception, and they can't. You can also add extra details such as a ticket pocket and functioning buttonholes, which are 50 bucks extra. (I think it's nuts to do that to a customer but hey...I only work for them).

Adjustments can be made for a hunched/arched back, shoulders, large biceps, large thighs, ect.

Salespeople are truthfully trained in the basics. They can put a coat on you, do chest and sleeve adjustments, and pant adjustments, but very few know all the complicated adjustments. I spent a day in another state going to a regional training session, so I learned everything.

Construction quality is solid. All the suits are hand-made in the USA in MA, by American factory workers. The fabrics are super 120's-140s, with some luxury fabrics thrown in. All fabrics are from Europe, mostly from Italy, with a few from Spanish mills. The suit is amazingly comfortable.

Overall, I like the program. I love the suit I made, and I have had satisfied reviews from customers. I'll attach a photo of the suit I made. Thanks for your question!

Thanks for the thorough reply. Is every branch supposed to have at least one person who has gone to regional training? I doubt the answer will be yes, but can MTM tuxedos be ordered through this program?
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by starro View Post

So is JA MTM fully canvassed, or half canvassed? The answer to that question would then have bearing to the claims of the suits being "handmade".
Handmade is not the same thing as hand sewn. These cannot be hand sewn. I also doubt they are fully canvassed. At that price point I'd be happy if they were half canvassed but wouldn't be surprised if they were fused.
post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by breakaway01 View Post


Handmade is not the same thing as hand sewn. These cannot be hand sewn. I also doubt they are fully canvassed. At that price point I'd be happy if they were half canvassed but wouldn't be surprised if they were fused.

 

Some research on AAAC reveals that they are half canvassed, as you surmised. I think eHaberdasher Benjamin line sets the bar in terms of affordability of canvassed suits. 

post #22 of 34
I'd like more info on how the suits are handmade at such a low price point.

What specifically is done by hand? Are the sleeve heads attached by hand?

Not being sarcastic. Just curious.

I thought the bar for handmade included suits like Brioni, Kiton, Formosa, etc...
post #23 of 34
And also, thanks for your contribution. Even though MW doesn't get a lot of love, it's great that your post is starting a larger conversation. Most posts on SF these days are "+1" or the classic "deetz please". (Present company included).
post #24 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starro View Post
 

 

So is JA MTM fully canvassed, or half canvassed? The answer to that question would then have bearing to the claims of the suits being "handmade".


Edited by menswear2613 - 3/15/16 at 7:52pm
post #25 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by breakaway01 View Post


Thanks for the thorough reply. Is every branch supposed to have at least one person who has gone to regional training? I doubt the answer will be yes, but can MTM tuxedos be ordered through this program?

Every location unfortunately does not have someone who has gone through the regional training. I would encourage you to ask the salesperson how experienced they are if you have an interest in looking into doing JA MTM. The store manager gets the most training, (although basic) and then has to pass it on to all the other salespeople. However I attended an optional training session.  

post #26 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by othertravel View Post

And also, thanks for your contribution. Even though MW doesn't get a lot of love, it's great that your post is starting a larger conversation. Most posts on SF these days are "+1" or the classic "deetz please". (Present company included).

Thanks for the support! 

 

While I admit, that mens wearhouse is honestly near the bottom of the rung of menswear, I do think that one can get some value out of the store, especially though the custom program. 

post #27 of 34
Interesting read
Edited by Alpha11 - 3/16/16 at 4:40am
post #28 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viral View Post

LOL..........the responses would be completely different if you said you worked part-time at RL.

OP - nothing wrong with being confident in yourself and don't feel you need to bow to some internet strangers who are most judging you because of the brand you represent. Most people on this forum don't have much formal training or knowledge about clothes - we are all fans and hobbyists of this subject matter alike.

Like I said, if you substitute MW with any of the "SF approved" ones you would have been welcomed with open arms!

Good luck at MW!

 

I agree with this, very much.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IChen View Post
 


Doesn't matter if he works at Kiton or Zegna or Brioni or Gap or Jcrew, but I sorta question how can he know menswear so much from a sales person standpoint at such a young age with such little experience. But obviously, he's passionate, done his research, put in effort, and he's confident which is all very good. To be fair, I'm sure there's a lot more about suiting that he could learn, myself included. I want to get into the tailoring aspect more but this isn't something generally taught.

 

But it's good that he put in the effort because learning how to sell isn't the same as product knowledge, so good for him.

 

This is true as well.  I'm trying to slowly learn about tailoring and it's pretty hard to figure out what sources can be trusted.

 

I'll add part of my post from another thread when I find it.  It was in the thread about the closing of Jos. A Bank stores.

 

edit: found it

 

- I rarely buy clothes, but when I do I drive two and a half hours to a store that has excellent service and manages to survive while doing zero e-commerce. I end up spending more than I anticipated and usually as much as I can possibly afford. On the way I drive by at least three Men's Warehouse stores and one Jos. A. Bank that I know of, in various locations.  Sometimes I don't spend much though, and only buy one sale item and the staff are never pushy.  Ever.  I have one salesman I deal with, and the other's know that and will help me if he is busy but once he is free they let him take over.  It's hard to describe how they will let you look and not hover but can tell if you need help, it kind of amazing.

 

I'll also add to this, there are only five salesman, including the two guys who run the store.  So everyone has people that are the customers they deal with on a regular basis.  I'm certainly not some VIP.  I'm rarely there, actually.  The staff is always friendly and professional though. 

 

tl;dr version - Service, quality, and building relationships count.  If you don't have these, you are at the mercy of retail trends and sale cycles like everything else.  Just my opinion though.

post #29 of 34


I'm glad you started this thread, and this is an interesting read. Yes, MW is at the bottom rung of the menswear world, and much of their sales tactics are sleazy or bordering on/are criminal. I would say that MW holds some value for customers who do not live near a major metropolitan area where there are other options, or for men who are reticent about purchasing clothing online. 

 

I worked for MW for 5 years when I was in college, and I worked for a higher end menswear store as well. Since I'm writing a book about working in menswear, I recently got an "undercover" job at MW again in order to gather some research. 

 

Perhaps the biggest thing I learned upon returning to this company (after a 16 year absence) is that I would never purchase clothing from MW. The overall quality of the clothing they sell has greatly diminished, and prices have risen. I'm sure the latter reflects inflation, but still. I do not think that any of the suits or sport coats they sell are anything but fused, except for the half-canvassed MTM Joseph Aboud. They've added some bullshit tailoring charges (crease set, shirt grippers), and they now outsource tailoring and have slashed the employment of in-store tailors. Most of the tailors they employ are at best competent alteration tailors, but they certainly do not employ any master tailors, as those are far and few between, and are a dying breed, especially in the United States. It is a high pressure sales environment, and MW wardrobe consultants and customer service associates are encouraged to outright lie to customers or to not disclose certain charges, such as the above-mentioned crease set. I was standing at the counter when a customer was rung up, and the manager said, "Give this guy [the customer] a crease set; I can tell he's classy" (read: add an extra $10 to the ticket, because, at this point the customer won't even notice that it's been added). Most MW employees are woefully uneducated about menswear and have little experience outside of working at MW. 

 

As for the MTM program, it's not a bad value for the cost especially if, like I said above, there aren't other options near where you live. It will not be a hand-sewn garment, but it will be pretty decent, and you can get mostly what you want, in terms of style (like, if you wanted a single breasted peak lapel jacket with patch pockets, or something, that's totally doable). But you couldn't do something like a particularly unique lapel style, such as fishmouth, for example. But if there's another company or a tailor who makes MTM that's not MW near where you live, I would look into the other options before buying at MW. For example, the high end cost for the JA MTM at MW is $1,700 for a suit. The low end is $500 for a sport coat. Prices are comparable for MTM from Hong Kong Tailor in my city, but the cut and tailoring at HKT are far better than at MW. When you purchase MTM at MW, your measurements are sent to a warehouse in New Jersey, where your suit is made, then it's shipped back to the store where you made your purchase where you come in to try your suit on and have your trousers hemmed, and the in-store tailor can make any adjustments that might be necessary. Although, then again, let's say that you need the sides taken in, and the sleeves shortened, they will then send your suit out again to their National Tailoring Service, then the suit will get shipped back to the store for you to try it on and see if it's finally right. The problem with all of this is that the person who marks your suit or who takes your measurements is never the person who does the alterations. Problematic, to say the least. But, at HKT, your suit is made right there in Atlanta, and it's possible that the tailor who fit you in the first place will be working on the construction of your suit at some point. So, for my money, I'd hit up HKT. 

 

Sorry this is kind of long, but I feel it's worth it to explain my reasoning here. 

post #30 of 34

Agreed.. I work for the company as well, and actually just ordered my own MTM suits. We're in an area where the fashion isn't as forward as say NYC, so it's nice to know you can get something different than what the malls sell. And this might be no big deal for some people but to me, getting a matching vest was worth every penny as not all OTR suits have one, nor can be purchased afterwards.

 

Here's one of the two I had made, it's a deep Navy blue, not black. 

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