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Your experience buying suits with a sales person?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi! I work as a sales person with low/medium range suits from Hugo Boss, and I really want to become better and give my customers a sublime experience shopping with me. Lately I got a reaction from my store manager, because a customer called him and complimented my great customer service - it really pushed me to wishing to become good at this job (I only got the job recently).

It leads me to this forum! Do you have any advice to me, speaking from your own experience, did your sales person say something or did something that normally you wouldnt expect of him/her? Something that made you feel very appreciated as a customer or perhaps very educated?


For example: I personally went shopping for a suit last year, and the sales person gave me two suits to try on (after talking to me about the occasion, color preferences etc) where he talked about the highlights of the two different suits (one was a solid navy, one was a navy with pinstripes). After picking my suit, he showed me three different shirts (one light blue classic, one striped, one with checks). After that, he showed me two great tie options one being silk and a bit formal, and the other one was a knit tie which was more casual.

I found that to be very nice for me as a customer, but as a sales person now, I also understand that its a good way for him to increase his own sales by perhaps discovering needs with the customer that he didnt know of!


Thanks a lot in advance for your time replying here... Everything is much appreciated, nomatter if you were shopping H&M or Kiton.

Kindest regards,
Simone

post #2 of 14
From a customer's POV, I understand a salesperson's job is to sell your product. But within that box, I would say pay close attention to detail and cues, verbal and otherwise.

Case in point: I was in a Brooks Brothers store just before Christmas looking for a vest for my tuxedo. I had the tuxedo with me as reviews of the BB vest suggested they are sized short. I tried on the whole rig in front of the SA, and not only did he still try to sell me another jacket and pants, the one he brought out was stylistically diametrically opposite to the one I had. And even after pointing out that I had one in a classic style which I was interested in, he continued to push the slim, short, notched Thom Browne number. When I politely said no again, he took it away, and never came back. The next time I saw him when I left the change area, his only comment was "so are you taking the vest or what?". I took the vest (options were limited and it was needed), but won't have him help me again when I go back to that store.

Don't be that guy.
post #3 of 14
Yeah most sales people judge. I'm young at 25 but know a little bit and I'm never greeted at the zegna store for example. Once bought Isaia sc on sale but made the manager take the sale since the sales person was super rude and talking like I didn't know the brand and was spewing crap.

Also like yourself, most sales people don't try on their own stuff and merchandise.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

Wow, that had got to be frustrating. I always try to make a pleasent conversation, and if I feel like there's no chance for me to sell further things (accessories, or another outfit etc) I always try to close it and make a positive comment, this could be the likes of: "Fine, perhaps another day. You chose some very nice pieces today, let me take you to the cash desk"

Or I also like saying "And we can always develop on the suit another day, by adding a different combination of a shirt and tie" etc.

Thanks for your reply!

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

Right, I know exactly what you feel. 

I learned not to be "that guy" by experiencing it myself aswell. I had a customer who didnt really look great in clothing or hair/facial hair etc, he basically looked like he just came from a jogging trip in the park and havent shaved for weeks - he tried on a leather jacket, almost 1200 pounds (the most expensive thing we have in the store) and he bought it immediately, with a visa infinite creditcard.

I did give him what I would consider my best treatment, and I am sure he had a very good experience shopping me, but wow, not once did I believe that he would be the customer for that.
I googled his name and he turned out to be CEO at one of Hong Kong's biggest casinos, and pictures of him at google showed him only wearing suits and fine watches.


I must admit that I did judge the customer, and I fortunately didnt "lose anything" by doing that, it was a good lesson for me as a new salesperson. 

post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

I tried all our suit jackets on today, and tried to "prepare" things I could use to describe them with - positive adjectives etc! :)

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simone1 View Post
 

I tried all our suit jackets on today, and tried to "prepare" things I could use to describe them with - positive adjectives etc! :)

 

 

Best of luck! Feel free to PM me if you have any more questions. 

 

also a good tip or at least what worked here, was that I was a bit more outspoken and tried to push some items harder on very inexperienced people/younger crowd shopping with their mom, who to be honest had no business buying $2k+ suits but it worked i guess lol

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

Wow haha :D Insane

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by IChen View Post


Best of luck! Feel free to PM me if you have any more questions. 

also a good tip or at least what worked here, was that I was a bit more outspoken and tried to push some items harder on very inexperienced people/younger crowd shopping with their mom, who to be honest had no business buying $2k+ suits but it worked i guess lol

And that right there is what makes people feel that sales people don't give a crap about the customer and helping them get what they truly want or need, but are only in it to raise their own sales numbers. Do you guys high-five and backslap once the sucker walks out the door?
post #10 of 14
Hello, how are you today?
What items are you seeking today?
Do you have a color and style in mind or would you like for me to assist you with selection of something? Are you interested in a more forward fashion suit or would a conservative more classic style be more appropriate?
May I suggest a shirt and tie to coordinate with the suit you have chosen?

These are questions to determine what the client needs without forcing yourself on them when it is not desired.

I would imagine many on here are like me and enter a store with a somewhat defined idea of what it is we are going to look to buy. I would only need direction to what I tell you I need. Many will enter store with only a need and no good idea of what meets that need and would be appropriate to wear for the occasion.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaggedyDandy View Post


And that right there is what makes people feel that sales people don't give a crap about the customer and helping them get what they truly want or need, but are only in it to raise their own sales numbers. Do you guys high-five and backslap once the sucker walks out the door?

Honestly, most of the employees in such a place like IChen worked at are very focused on their KPI numbers (Key performance indicators) like transactions, average units per transaction etc. Not only are they very motivated to achieve highest possible, but they are also comissioned with bonus, and if they are doing a bad job they will be fired.


Customer service is absolutely critical, but I don't think there's a single store manager in a luxury fashion brand store out there, who would be mad at a colleague for trying to push expensive sales on inexperienced people - lets face it, even though it might not seem very nice, it's just how it is :)

 

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 

I absolutely agree with everything you said. I ask these open questions aswell!
"Discovery" is an important part of a great sale.. You get to know your customer and will have an easier (and more pleasent) time servicing him properly :)

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simone1 View Post
 

Honestly, most of the employees in such a place like IChen worked at are very focused on their KPI numbers (Key performance indicators) like transactions, average units per transaction etc. Not only are they very motivated to achieve highest possible, but they are also comissioned with bonus, and if they are doing a bad job they will be fired.


Customer service is absolutely critical, but I don't think there's a single store manager in a luxury fashion brand store out there, who would be mad at a colleague for trying to push expensive sales on inexperienced people - lets face it, even though it might not seem very nice, it's just how it is :)

 

I get that, as I mentioned in my first post, but it reinforces my default reaction that when I walk into a store the SA isn't there to help me first. I now try to go into places knowing exactly what I want - i.e. I'm there to buy something, not to be sold something. It's unfortunate, but knowing that's how the businesses run things sets it up as almost an adversarial relationship right out of the gate.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaggedyDandy View Post


And that right there is what makes people feel that sales people don't give a crap about the customer and helping them get what they truly want or need, but are only in it to raise their own sales numbers. Do you guys high-five and backslap once the sucker walks out the door?


But that's the thing like, if they're inexperienced, there's only so much you can tell him. Obviously all I really said, was like I suggest navy since it's a good versatile suit color and wool is a nice material. By push, I mean like when people come in looking for black suits, I tend to steer them away to navy or maybe grey. I don't suggest anything wrong in terms of sizing or style and I give honest opinions.

 

I remember saying that a Kiton jacket for $5000+ on this guy looked ridiculous since it didn't work with his outfit. But maybe you misunderstand me, I'm not saying push products on the guy, I'm saying if the guy is inexperienced, put more emphasis on suggestions that's all.

If the guy truly wants a black suit, so be it. But I think it's still nice if you tried to suggest/push navy. Obviously this comes with a risk where the customer thinks you're not listening and you're trying to suggest something else. And yes, I did encounter lots of young people looking for black and I showed them navy.

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