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Frustration: I have never tried shoes that did not hurt - Page 2

post #16 of 22
OP, I strongly, strongly suggest that you make a field trip to Moulded Shoe in New York City. The guys at Moulded really know feet, really know how to fit shoes, and stock an immense variety of lasts and sizes. They solved my fit problems definitively.
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrRandy View Post
 

By "regularly", I mean that I have worn them for about 9-10 hours once ever 2-3 days over four months.

 

I understand about lasts and leather stretching, but how can I find shoes that fit without buying 30 pairs of shoes and wearing all of them for a year until I figure out the right kind of tight?

 

Coming from the school of "hard to fit", I totally understand your frustration. Took me three years to finally nail the right fit.

 

If I may venture to guess, you have had a lot of time in sneakers and comfy shoes. That needs to be unlearned.

 

Tight, as other posters have pointed out, is correct. For most lay people (that means 99% of shoe buyers), they will never buy a correct fitting shoe because it will feel too tight.

 

Perhaps you might watch out for these indicators:

 

1. There is no extra wiggle room at the back on the heel cup. Not even half a millimetre. Sometimes, the back of the heel exerts a slight pressure on your foot- that is ideal.

2. Further to 1 above, you should not be able to slide your feet forward to give you room at the heel cup, and even if you could do that, the shoe should spring back to touch your heel.

3. When new, you should not be able to put on the shoes without a shoehorn. Taking it off will also require effort.

4. When laces are tightened, you should feel the shoe touching the sides of your feet and the instep. Sometimes, the shoe exerts slight pressure on the sides, that is fine as long as the pressure is not localised at one particular point. 

5. Further to the instep issue above, when you press the vamp, there should be very minimal "give".

6. Except for the side of the little toe and the side of the big toe, none of the front of your toes should be touching the edge of the toe box.

7. Overall, once your feet is in the shoe, there should be very little to no room for the shoe to move front and back, or side to side. That means the fit is snug.

8. Obviously, once fitted, your toes should not be bending at the joints.

9. An indication of a good fit is when the air rushes out of the shoe in a woosh when you slip your feet in, and after about 10 minutes, despite the pressure, your feet does not feel like it has a shoe on it.

 

For oxfords, if the lacing faces meet up with once another at the first fitting, then the size is too large. This is because the corkbed sinks as you break in the shoe, giving your feet more room in the shoe, 

 

These are things that spring to mind.

 

Hope this helps.

post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post
 

 

If I may venture to guess, you have had a lot of time in sneakers and comfy shoes. That needs to be unlearned.

 

I was thinking the same thing. 

 

Although leather shoes can be as comfortable as athletic shoes, they feel different.

post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 

Update on my progress:

I put some moleskin in the heel. I tried it just behind the heel and them wrapped around the heel. I tried it inside my sock and with the adhesive on the shoe itself (I hope that did not hurt the shoe, and it seem like it did not). The moleskin wrapped around my heel made the shoes not hurt on my heel at all. From this, I believe that the heel should be less wide and closer to the ball of my foot (I think that the pain persisting when the moleskin was inside my sock is evidence against the comfort just coming from having extra padding). There is still pain in the ball of my foot and the outer toes that press against the front of the shoe, so I expect that to be solved by having more width there and less right before the ball. All this is to say that I now have one imaginary pair of shoes that does not hurt. 

I may take advantage of Allen Edmonds' very generous return policy to try out some lasts and widths that I cannot find in stores. I feel slightly guilty ordering shoes that I am very likely to return, but this will probably increase the probability that I buy shoes from them in the long run.

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrRandy View Post

Update on my progress:


I put some moleskin in the heel. I tried it just behind the heel and them wrapped around the heel. I tried it inside my sock and with the adhesive on the shoe itself (I hope that did not hurt the shoe, and it seem like it did not). The moleskin wrapped around my heel made the shoes not hurt on my heel at all. From this, I believe that the heel should be less wide and closer to the ball of my foot (I think that the pain persisting when the moleskin was inside my sock is evidence against the comfort just coming from having extra padding). There is still pain in the ball of my foot and the outer toes that press against the front of the shoe, so I expect that to be solved by having more width there and less right before the ball. All this is to say that I now have one imaginary pair of shoes that does not hurt. 


I may take advantage of Allen Edmonds' very generous return policy to try out some lasts and widths that I cannot find in stores. I feel slightly guilty ordering shoes that I am very likely to return, but this will probably increase the probability that I buy shoes from them in the long run.

Where are you located?
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsuperb View Post


Where are you located?

Halfway between Atlanta and Charlotte.

post #22 of 22

Very nice, Allen Edmonds is probably the best choice to find shoes that fits with their wide variety of width options.

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