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The San Bernadino Iphone Case and The Notion of Privacy - Page 3

Poll Results: WWSJD: What would Steve Jerbs do?

 
  • 9% (1)
    Create the Ultimo Universal Encryption Hammer and Fork it Over to Obummer Once and For All
  • 45% (5)
    Tell the FBI to "Go figure it out ya morans!"
  • 9% (1)
    Wear a black turtleneck with levi's and new balances
  • 36% (4)
    Time travel; befriend Prime Guvnah Ahhnuld, find and kill Connemara, avoid the cybernetic war
11 Total Votes  
post #31 of 46
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/jul/20/rise-of-data-death-of-politics-evgeny-morozov-algorithmic-regulation
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

I'm just not that interested in this particular case, but the impact of the court order on the security of the other iphones out there, which seems to be based on Apple's obstinacy rather than any technical difficulty in cracking the passwords.


Keep in mind that the FBI is not asking Apple to crack the password on the device. They are asking them to code a compromised version of iOS that can be loaded onto the iPhone so it can be cracked. There is a fundamental difference here and I believe in it will lie if Apple will be able to make a strong case to the courts or not.
post #33 of 46
Yeah, and if they were a bank with a vault that was designed so it could only be opened by the guy's key, but in fact they were more than capable of making another key that would open it, the courts would make them do it. I just don't think they have much of a case.
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Yeah, and if they were a bank with a vault that was designed so it could only be opened by the guy's key, but in fact they were more than capable of making another key that would open it, the courts would make them do it. I just don't think they have much of a case.

That vault key couldn't be used by bad actors to compromise all other vaults.
post #35 of 46
If a Republican were in the White House, this would be a huge fucking issue. As it should be.
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post

If a Republican were in the White House, this would be a huge fucking issue. As it should be.

You have become a really shitty poster. Why even bother?
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by cross22 View Post

You have become a really ****** poster. Why even bother?

You forget yourself, sir.
post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by cross22 View Post

You have become a really shitty poster. Why even bother?

I wish I remembered who you were so I could have a snappy comeback. I don't bother to visit or post a lot. It's just been depressing, if not surprising, to see so many "liberals" roll over for the police state after bitching about it (and rightly so) for eight years of Bush.
Edited by FLMountainMan - 3/3/16 at 9:53am
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post

I wish I remembered who you were so I could have a snappy comeback. I don't bother to visit or post a lot. It's just been depressing, if not surprising, to see so many "liberals" roll over for the police state after bitching about it (and rightly so) for eight years of Bush.

Wait, do you mean liberals out and about or liberal politicians?

Because while some liberal politicians may be rolling over for the police state, I'd say all of the liberals I know, and liberal media (things like the Daily Show) seem to be siding with Apple on this.
post #40 of 46
I Googled "FBI Obey" looking for a dumb meme to post and was amused that the image results returned are full of pictures of Tim Cook and Apple.

https://www.google.com/search?q=apple+obey&espv=2&biw=1438&bih=914&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwigw6Cor6XLAhWE6iYKHcisBYkQ_AUIBygC#tbm=isch&q=FBI+obey
post #41 of 46
post #42 of 46
A good thing to come out of this would be apple selling its products on being secure/private etc. iOS as a platform has a really good security model and they don't really need to mine the shit out of your data like google and everyone else who relies on ads for revenue.
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Yeah, and if they were a bank with a vault that was designed so it could only be opened by the guy's key, but in fact they were more than capable of making another key that would open it, the courts would make them do it. I just don't think they have much of a case.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post


That vault key couldn't be used by bad actors to compromise all other vaults.

 

There are two things at issue in my mind.

First, odds are the FBI could actually crack this individual phone.

 

Second, the government should already have access to this phone because it is a government paid for phone.  This guy was using his work phone, and he worked at a government agency.  Every company I have worked for that provides a phone (or pays for your personal phone and lets you access corporate networks) has the ability to access your phone.

post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

Second, the government should already have access to this phone because it is a government paid for phone.  This guy was using his work phone, and he worked at a government agency.  Every company I have worked for that provides a phone (or pays for your personal phone and lets you access corporate networks) has the ability to access your phone.

I dunno about that. My company pays my phone bill, but I only grant access to them my phone when I join it to the exchange server. I'm not even sure how much access that afford them. I know they can remotely wipe the phone and lock down what I can do with the phone...but I don't think they can simply access my phone at will.

And that's only assuming I actually join the phone to the domain. If I just remove the work account from the settings page, they lose all access to my phone. For a while I actually used a 3rd party email program that talked to the server...so my company only had access to that program, not to my whole phone (but I'd need a password to get into that program, rather than into my phone).
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post


I dunno about that. My company pays my phone bill, but I only grant access to them my phone when I join it to the exchange server. I'm not even sure how much access that afford them. I know they can remotely wipe the phone and lock down what I can do with the phone...but I don't think they can simply access my phone at will.

And that's only assuming I actually join the phone to the domain. If I just remove the work account from the settings page, they lose all access to my phone. For a while I actually used a 3rd party email program that talked to the server...so my company only had access to that program, not to my whole phone (but I'd need a password to get into that program, rather than into my phone).

 

Unless I'm completely mistaken, in this case, the employer owned the phone.  You would think the employer would require some kind of ability to access the phone.

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