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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread 2016 - News, Pictures, Sizing, Accessories, Clothing, etc - Page 137

post #2041 of 19328
Quote:
Originally Posted by danwatts2005 View Post

And I'll add that my particular shade of Cognac McTavish are also very close in color.

Another great observation that I too had noticed..to my eye, cognac is basically dark chili with more highlights
post #2042 of 19328

All,

 

has AE taken down the foot measuring guide from the website? I couldn't find it.

I am trying to pick up a pair for my father and have the 3 measurements of his feet (h-to-t, h-to-b, w). I was hoping to use that guide to get his size (I am pretty certain with 2-3 different sizes I can nail it down on the 511 or 201)

 

With the AE sizing guide gone, I tried to search for actual size to brannock conversions. I was able to find the heel to toe formula (size *3 - 22), which correlates with the conversions given here, plus it also provides the width.

 

http://web.archive.org/web/20071017074837/www.geocities.com/handy_feet/shoesize.html

 

However, I couldn't find the formula for the heel to ball measurement. Does any one of you know this?

 

thanks!

post #2043 of 19328
@Count de Monet I hate to sound mean but id like to see the outcome of this be that retail B&M stores start closing down and that they basically do business through Nordstrom & the outlets. Hey, if the retail stores are losing so much money keeping a couple sizes, why keep them open at all by that logic? Unfortunately it takes something like that before the PE group's braintrust wakes up.
post #2044 of 19328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Count de Monet View Post

Imagine a world where the B&M AE stores only carry 9D - 12D. No narrows or wides in any size. That's what a SA told me today. Said they've shipped back a couple hundred shoes in the last week or two.

He said they've been told customers are being conditioned to guess on sizes and order over the Internet and the powers that be think having almost all shoes drop shipped from a central location is more efficient. I asked if this was the brainchild of the new PE group. He said "wellllll .... things like this DID seem to start about that time."

So, since I need an E or EE in almost everything, I guess the last two shoes I'll ever get to have tried on in an AE store were an Indy on the 201 last the the SA ordered in for me (turned out to be a brown Barttlet) and a walnut Cornwallis (a guy had order both the walnut and brown and kept just the brown).

The fit on the 201 was perfect for my high instep. The Cornwallis on the 1943 fit great, too, but the "V-gap" was huge, even greater than when I wear an E in the 5 last. It looked gorgeous.

I asked about buying. Hopkinson and he said they don't even have any uppers cut in an E width. So, minimum 4-6 weeks wait. The last Carmina's I ordered got to me in 3 business days.

Thanks AE.

I can only agree with you that this is not great, being a 3E myself. Then again I live in Canada and have never tried an AE on in a brick and mortar store ever and I had to pay $40 (US!) shipping every time.

So rejoice! You get free shipping, and you don't pay an extra 40% or so on top and you aren't out an extra $1000+ for a few weeks if you try to save on shipping by ordering multiple sizes or lasts.

Did I mention that Harry Rosen and other stores that DO carry AE here never carried anything but D and they'd make you buy anything they ordered in?
post #2045 of 19328
Quote:
Originally Posted by danwatts2005 View Post


I have to respectively disagree with this. IMO, Oxblood is way more versatile than Walnut. Oxblood kills with jeans, navy, khaki, and all greys. I dont think you're going to find that kind of versatility with Walnut. Plus, the Oxblood dresses up or down better. If you have a limited shoe budget, you'll get more miles for the buck with Oxblood. It shows a maturity of choice where the Walnut projects a somewhat limited view of style and color coordination. Just my opinion.

All true and good advice. However, chicks dig walnut. 

post #2046 of 19328
Quote:
Originally Posted by smfdoc View Post
 

About 6 days ago there were numerous posts on VSC (Venetian Shoe Cream) and its work on shell and other shoes. I am rarely satisfied with my own polishing efforts. This is most likely the result of inadequate effort on my part, especially when I see remarks about brushing a shoe for 30+ minutes. Being a sucker for any new product, I ordered a small bottle and went to work. Light coat rubbed in, let dry for 30 minutes, wipe off with a clean cloth and brush for 1-2 minutes. (See, not enough brushing.) I was VERY pleased with the pop in color and the shine that came to shoes that I had had limited success with in the past. Although it is difficult to see on the screen, there was a very nice improvement in the black Bryons after a single application. The top is a before taken outside last week and the lower is after application, also taken outside.

 

 

 

 

I was surprised at the amount of black that rubbed off the shoe as the VSC was being applied. I assume this is older polish that was adding to the dullness even though I brush the shoes before and after each wearing. The shoes were "ok" initially but looked flat or dull to my eye. Although it is hard to tell, the result is a much shinier and brighter finish. I suddenly would not hesitate to wear them to a wedding or similar event. I recommend VSC as have many others on the forum, especially to those like me who probably exert too little effort in this area. I bought my VSC HERE in case the urge strikes you.

Those look good. And I agree - can't do 30 mins of brushing. Unless that much physical activity is bringing something out of the leather I can't imagine what all that brushing does. I haven't used VSC, but my experience with Bick4 is similar. Very likely any of these are going to be solvents for what's on top of the leather. My approach after reading some of the experts in the shoe care thread is to be a minimalist: damp cloth wipe down after every wear followed by a light brushing. I use a welt brush occasionally to keep them clean. 

 

I don't condition my shoes regularly. I would use product of I wanted a shine. I generally don't. I will use cream as needed to cover scuffs. This is rare. And I get a nice looking satin finish on most of my shoes with a microfiber cloth after brushing. Very fast and very easy. 

post #2047 of 19328
Brushing for all that time really only works on pull up leathers such as cxl, dublin, and shell. These leathers are inpregnated with fats/oils that get worked to the surface and shine. Regular calf leather will not benefit from anything more than a few minutes of brushing. Just an fyi.
post #2048 of 19328

Gentlemen:

 

I’m looking to get some double monks for Spring (my first foray into any type of monk). I’m interested in the Mora 2.0, but the online reviews (from a couple of years ago) are decidedly mixed, with complaints of awkward creasing and quality control issues. Have they improved? I have five other pairs of AEs that I’m happy with, but should I be concerned about this model?

post #2049 of 19328
Public Service Announcement:
Anyone who picked up a pair of recently discontinued bourbon color shoes might be interested in the return of the bourbon Dearborn belt in the AE clearance section.
Once they're gone, they're gone.
post #2050 of 19328
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

Public Service Announcement:
Anyone who picked up a pair of recently discontinued bourbon color shoes might be interested in the return of the bourbon Dearborn belt in the AE clearance section.
Once they're gone, they're gone.


I just went to check now. The product page listed my size, but when I clicked on it, it disappeared and said "This item is currently not available." What a bullshit tease.

 

Is there a decent alternative to go with bourbon shoes? Are the Yukon or Sun River close in color?

post #2051 of 19328
How to make cheap shoe trees better (OT)

I've seen recent discussion of shoe tree sales (such as JAB trees) and thought I would share my modifications to such trees. While I strongly prefer Woodlore Epic trees, they are relatively expensive and I have plenty of JAB tres. To me, the big shortcoming of the JAB and basic woodlore models is the lack of a good handhold. To solve this, I simply added brass knobs to the cheap trees, which magnifies their utility substantially (especially for boots!). If you have a few basic tools, there's not much to get.

As pictured below, for each pair, you will need:
- 2x Cabinet knobs (I like brass to match the nicer shoe trees)
- 2x 8/32 screws, preferably brass, 1/2" in length (5/8 could potentially work but will be hard to get into place)
- A tiny Phillips screwdriver (#0 or so) to remove the nameplate
- An 11/64 drill bit and a driver (you probably could go up to 3/16 if absolutely necessary)
- (Optional) small needlenose pliers


How to:
1. Remove the existing nameplates.

2. Drill a hole on or near the screw hole closest to the front. Take care not to move too far back or you'll get into the area where the shoe tree curves, which means your screw won't be long enough.


3. Feed the screw through the hole from below. Pliers are not essential but will help, especially for those of us with robust fingers.


4. Hold the screw head in place with a finger and thread the knob on top.


5. Place trees in shoes.


That's it. It is pretty quick - I could probably do this for a dozen pairs in the time it will take me to write this post.

Of note, some of you may be tempted to buy a longer screw (2") and attach the knob near the back of a tree. I do not recommend this, for several reasons:
- it's more complicated. You will have to drill a countersink and do some sanding. It's even worse if you want to avoid the wood on the bottom splintering.
- it may get into the heel of the shoe (see below)
- unless you go really far back on the tree, the spring mechanism is in the way

Trust me on this. If you don't believe me, post your skepticism and I'll take a photo of why this is a bad idea. The method outlined above puts the knob in a really handy place (especially for boots), and looks fine aesthetically:


That's it. Hope this is useful to all of the barn weasels - enjoy!
post #2052 of 19328
Warning: Awesome shoe tree improvement instructions spoilered! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jet-stream View Post

How to make cheap shoe trees better (OT)

I've seen recent discussion of shoe tree sales (such as JAB trees) and thought I would share my modifications to such trees. While I strongly prefer Woodlore Epic trees, they are relatively expensive and I have plenty of JAB tres. To me, the big shortcoming of the JAB and basic woodlore models is the lack of a good handhold. To solve this, I simply added brass knobs to the cheap trees, which magnifies their utility substantially (especially for boots!). If you have a few basic tools, there's not much to get.

As pictured below, for each pair, you will need:
- 2x Cabinet knobs (I like brass to match the nicer shoe trees)
- 2x 8/32 screws, preferably brass, 1/2" in length (5/8 could potentially work but will be hard to get into place)
- A tiny Phillips screwdriver (#0 or so) to remove the nameplate
- An 11/64 drill bit and a driver (you probably could go up to 3/16 if absolutely necessary)
- (Optional) small needlenose pliers


How to:
1. Remove the existing nameplates.

2. Drill a hole on or near the screw hole closest to the front. Take care not to move too far back or you'll get into the area where the shoe tree curves, which means your screw won't be long enough.


3. Feed the screw through the hole from below. Pliers are not essential but will help, especially for those of us with robust fingers.


4. Hold the screw head in place with a finger and thread the knob on top.


5. Place trees in shoes.


That's it. It is pretty quick - I could probably do this for a dozen pairs in the time it will take me to write this post.

Of note, some of you may be tempted to buy a longer screw (2") and attach the knob near the back of a tree. I do not recommend this, for several reasons:
- it's more complicated. You will have to drill a countersink and do some sanding. It's even worse if you want to avoid the wood on the bottom splintering.
- it may get into the heel of the shoe (see below)
- unless you go really far back on the tree, the spring mechanism is in the way

Trust me on this. If you don't believe me, post your skepticism and I'll take a photo of why this is a bad idea. The method outlined above puts the knob in a really handy place (especially for boots), and looks fine aesthetically:


That's it. Hope this is useful to all of the barn weasels - enjoy!

 

 

Four notes on the above post:

1. I did include some AE shoes for relevance.  That's how I roll.

2. If I can figure out how one does it, I'll cross-post in the shoe care thread.  Any others I should target?

3. Brass screws in this size are readily available at any hardware store or big-box home improvement store, typically about $1.20 for 6 pcs.

3. If you don't want to shop for just the right knob, I used the cheapest brass knobs I could find on amazon (<$1 each).  The specific ones I used are now like $5 each, but this would be pretty much the same thing: http://www.amazon.com/Amerock-BP1910-PB-Allison-Hardware-Polished/dp/B000HAUS9Q/ref=pd_sim_60_2?ie=UTF8&dpID=410WUDdjiwL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR131%2C160_&refRID=0EZ3DF9N9FVFF59KRC1E - note this is an add-on item if you want free shipping (assumes amazon prime).  If you get the knobs for this price, the total cost of modifying a pair of trees is <$2.50.

post #2053 of 19328
Quote:
Originally Posted by jet-stream View Post

Warning: Awesome shoe tree improvement instructions spoilered! (Click to show)

Four notes on the above post:
1. I did include some AE shoes for relevance.  That's how I roll.
2. If I can figure out how one does it, I'll cross-post in the shoe care thread.  Any others I should target?
3. Brass screws in this size are readily available at any hardware store or big-box home improvement store, typically about $1.20 for 6 pcs.
3. If you don't want to shop for just the right knob, I used the cheapest brass knobs I could find on amazon (<$1 each).  The specific ones I used are now like $5 each, but this would be pretty much the same thing: http://www.amazon.com/Amerock-BP1910-PB-Allison-Hardware-Polished/dp/B000HAUS9Q/ref=pd_sim_60_2?ie=UTF8&dpID=410WUDdjiwL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR131%2C160_&refRID=0EZ3DF9N9FVFF59KRC1E - note this is an add-on item if you want free shipping (assumes amazon prime).  If you get the knobs for this price, the total cost of modifying a pair of trees is <$2.50.

Thanks a lot! I am gonna try this.
post #2054 of 19328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarlet View Post


I just went to check now. The product page listed my size, but when I clicked on it, it disappeared and said "This item is currently not available." What a bullshit tease.

Is there a decent alternative to go with bourbon shoes? Are the Yukon or Sun River close in color?

I have both the Dearborn in Bourbon and the Sun River. I would say that for most bourbon models, the Sun River is too casual.
post #2055 of 19328
Gentlemen,

Does anyone have experience with AE Varno 1.0/2.0? Based on pics they appear to be similar to Leeds but with rubber soles and foam insole. I am a bit skeptical of the foam insole.

Thanks
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