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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread 2016 - News, Pictures, Sizing, Accessories, Clothing, etc - Page 895

post #13411 of 17725

Just want to see if this is a defect on a new pair of Mcallister's.  I am a long time lurker at styleforum and this is my first post.  I am now in a financial position to upgrade my wardrobe.  Thanks to styleforum I have started buying Edmond's and just put order in at MTM Black Label for a suit.  I just ordered the merlot Mcallisters from their clearance.  In the picture you can see the side of the sole is not a smooth cut and stitching seems awfully close to the edge.  Is this normal enough to not worry about it or should I return them?  I ordered a 12D and it seems to fit really well, ball of foot is right at widest point and no heel slip.  I am 2 hours away to a store in Minneapolis and hope get there this week to be fitted to make sure.  I would like to order more in the upcoming Oct sale.  Thanks!   

 

 

 

 

post #13412 of 17725
Quote:
Originally Posted by farscape105 View Post
 

Just want to see if this is a defect on a new pair of Mcallister's.  I am a long time lurker at styleforum and this is my first post.  I am now in a financial position to upgrade my wardrobe.  Thanks to styleforum I have started buying Edmond's and just put order in at MTM Black Label for a suit.  I just ordered the merlot Mcallisters from their clearance.  In the picture you can see the side of the sole is not a smooth cut and stitching seems awfully close to the edge.  Is this normal enough to not worry about it or should I return them?  I ordered a 12D and it seems to fit really well, ball of foot is right at widest point and no heel slip.  I am 2 hours away to a store in Minneapolis and hope get there this week to be fitted to make sure.  I would like to order more in the upcoming Oct sale.  Thanks!   

 

 

 

 

 

Not a defect in any way. Enjoy your shoes. 

post #13413 of 17725

Figure I'll ask here before reaching out to AE:

 

Does anyone know the actual difference in Widths vs General size increases for AE (specifically the 5 last?)

 

For example, is a 8.5 EE wider than a 9E? Im assuimg when a shoe increases in size (8.5 -> 9) there is also a slight increase in width. Im wondering what width difference is moving down one half overall size. Currently own a 9E but have decided it is slightly too long for my foot. Width is good, maybe slightly on the narrow side, and am wondering if a 8.5 EE would give me better length with a bit more width than a 9E.

post #13414 of 17725

Great Thanks!!  I am like a kid in candy store.  I bought some belts and boat shoes and looking at buying some Shreveport and blue Neumonks, which my girlfriend loves which surprised me.  Also, maybe some boots for winter.   It looks like they are reducing the number of colors for consistency.  

 

Should I buy a couple tubes of merlot polish or will they probably continue to carry it for awhile?  Also, I searched and can't find answer why the conditioner/cleaner is not available on Amazon or Edmond's site?

post #13415 of 17725
Looking for some sizing help here. 11d fits great in PA, Ashton, Wilbert and Carlyle. But in these Flatiron's, its seems about .25" too long in the ball area. Also, the toe box sticks out an extra .5" more than I'd like. I'm considering going down to a 10.5e, but am afraid the tow box might be too tight. I tested this by pushing my foot into the shoe where I feel the ball of my foot should rest, and my toes feel squished. Would a 10.5e be a similar width as a 11d?



PS. My big toe ends right at the large left medallion hole.
post #13416 of 17725
I'll say the 511 is "less bulbous" than Alden Barrie or Country Last's like EG 64. But the definition of sleek in footwear is contoured and form-fitting.
post #13417 of 17725

Interesting comments.   I always thought the 65 last was the most sleek, because it is more narrow than the 108.  Both of them work well for my skinny feet.

post #13418 of 17725

FYI, Shannon Drive long wings on Ebay for $119. Most length sizes in B, D or E widths only. Click here. I have no connection to this sale, just an FYI.

 

post #13419 of 17725

A bit late, but as promised: Brown Shell Cornwallis pics!

 

 

 

post #13420 of 17725
Before:


After:



I'd bought these walnut Daltons on the shoe bank a while back because I couldn't pass them up at $200, but rarely wore them because I didn't need ANOTHER pair of walnut. So I stripped and re-dyed them in mahogany. I'll wear these a lot more.

If anyone wants step by step... Just let me know. Hope everyone's having a great weekend!
post #13421 of 17725
Quote:
Originally Posted by FaRKle View Post

A bit late, but as promised: Brown Shell Cornwallis pics!









Absolutely incredible. I'm drooling. Does the brown shell have a hint of red/mahogany, or is that just the camera and/or my oversaturated Samsung phone screen?
post #13422 of 17725
Quote:
Originally Posted by billikenman View Post

If anyone wants step by step... Just let me know. Hope everyone's having a great weekend!

Please post steps!
post #13423 of 17725
Quote:
Originally Posted by FaRKle View Post

A bit late, but as promised: Brown Shell Cornwallis pics!
Gawjus. Chili in church for a baptism today for me. Maybe not my Sunday best, but certainly better than anyone else there!
post #13424 of 17725


I do a little leather working for fun on the side (not my day job).  Wallets and belts and that sort of thing.  That said, I know there are people much more knowledgeable than myself on here so feel free to correct or offer suggestions, but here's my method:

 

1)  Get the shoes you're going to be dyeing, remove the shoe laces and give them a good cleaning.  Specifically, yoll need to get rid of all the build-up polishes, waxes, and as much of the previous dye as possible.  I use acetone.  It's a harsh chemical and will dry out the leather, but we'll re-condition it later on in the process.  It's very very important to get as much of the wax, polish, and previous dye off of the shoe as possible so the new dye can soak into the leather properly, and evenly.

 

2)  Figure out what color and brand of dye you're going to use.  I use Fiebing's - they have a Professional line and a standard line.  I've used both, and like them both.  They have more color options in their standard line.  If you have a Tandy Leather store in your vicinity, you can browse all the leather dyes and see samples of what they look like on a finished product.

 

3)  Tape off any parts of the shoe that you don't want dyed (sole edges, heels maybe, especially if you're messy).  This Fibbing's dye is strong stuff.  Put on latex gloves (the dye will leave stains on your hands for days).  

 

4)  Dye the shoes.  Using either a dauber (which usually comes with the box of Fiebing's), or a rag, begin applying the dye.  Use circular motions and push it deep into the leather.    After applying the dye all over, let it dry for a little bit (ten minutes?) and then use a clean rag and wipe the shoe vigorously.  This will blend in the color somewhat, and bring out a bit of a sheen.  At this point, add another layer of dye if you want to, or if you need to in order to even out the coloring.  Generally additional applications of dye will lead to a darker and more uniform color.  You can achieve some cool low lights and highlights by going heavier in some spots (like Lobb's museum calf).  

 

5)  Condition / Polish / Wax.  You'll want a good conditioner to put moisture back in the shoes, because between the acetone (or other stripping solution) and the dye, they'll need it.  I use something like a Carnauba cream, Saphir Reno, then applications of cream polish.  The combination of these multiple applications will also help to even out and redistribute the dye on the shoes and smooth out the color just a bit.   Then I finish with a coat or two of saphir colored and clear wax.  

post #13425 of 17725
Quote:
Originally Posted by billikenman View Post


I do a little leather working for fun on the side (not my day job).  Wallets and belts and that sort of thing.  That said, I know there are people much more knowledgeable than myself on here so feel free to correct or offer suggestions, but here's my method:

1)  Get the shoes you're going to be dyeing, remove the shoe laces and give them a good cleaning.  Specifically, yoll need to get rid of all the build-up polishes, waxes, and as much of the previous dye as possible.  I use acetone.  It's a harsh chemical and will dry out the leather, but we'll re-condition it later on in the process.  It's very very important to get as much of the wax, polish, and previous dye off of the shoe as possible so the new dye can soak into the leather properly, and evenly.

2)  Figure out what color and brand of dye you're going to use.  I use Fiebing's - they have a Professional line and a standard line.  I've used both, and like them both.  They have more color options in their standard line.  If you have a Tandy Leather store in your vicinity, you can browse all the leather dyes and see samples of what they look like on a finished product.

3)  Tape off any parts of the shoe that you don't want dyed (sole edges, heels maybe, especially if you're messy).  This Fibbing's dye is strong stuff.  Put on latex gloves (the dye will leave stains on your hands for days).  

4)  Dye the shoes.  Using either a dauber (which usually comes with the box of Fiebing's), or a rag, begin applying the dye.  Use circular motions and push it deep into the leather.    After applying the dye all over, let it dry for a little bit (ten minutes?) and then use a clean rag and wipe the shoe vigorously.  This will blend in the color somewhat, and bring out a bit of a sheen.  At this point, add another layer of dye if you want to, or if you need to in order to even out the coloring.  Generally additional applications of dye will lead to a darker and more uniform color.  You can achieve some cool low lights and highlights by going heavier in some spots (like Lobb's museum calf).  

5)  Condition / Polish / Wax.  You'll want a good conditioner to put moisture back in the shoes, because between the acetone (or other stripping solution) and the dye, they'll need it.  I use something like a Carnauba cream, Saphir Reno, then applications of cream polish.  The combination of these multiple applications will also help to even out and redistribute the dye on the shoes and smooth out the color just a bit.   Then I finish with a coat or two of saphir colored and clear wax.  

I would never trust myself to attempt this, but those look absolutely incredible
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