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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread 2016 - News, Pictures, Sizing, Accessories, Clothing, etc - Page 85

post #1261 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by redmusic1 View Post


As @billikenman
 indicated. You aren't mixing the pigments between the leather and the polish like you would when mixing paint or clay. You are putting a transparent color over an opaque color. When applying a darker transparent color over a lighter base, the outer layer absorbs more and reflects less light than the leather underneath it, while some light still passes through and allows the original characteristics of the leather to reflect what is left. However, it simply doesn't work when a lighter transparent color is put on a darker base. Because the outer coat is absorbing less light than the leather underneath it, it simply isn't doing anything while still transparent. The permanent pigment (edit: of the leather) can never be made to absorb less and reflect more light than it did unless it is blotted out with pure wax, which has no characteristics of leather. It would look like a flat chili colored mess of wax instead of leather. Think about painting over a wall. The pigments don't mix if the paint was dry, and it would take many coats of a transparent pink to overcome a dark red, while it would only take one coat in the other direction. 

If we're talking 'instant' results then, yes, stripping and re-dyeing is the only way to go from a dark to light shade. If you have a longer (i.e. years) timeline, using the lighter polish is not superfluous. Here is a pic my 'old' chili Delray next to dark chili:



I allowed them to lighten by mixing applications of chili shoe cream with walnut, mid tan and even neutral cream and wax. I also used some dark brown and black on the burnishing. I'm currently doing something similar with my dark chili Bleecker Street. It will probably be a couple years before I even notice anything and another few years before they settle into the desired shade.
post #1262 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by ace13x View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercs View Post

Hey guys, so I'm looking into getting a pair of boots, would you suggest the Normandy or the Sturgis? Thanks in advance.


I love the Normandy, in Black.  The distressing on the Brown doesn't do it for me.  I can't speak to all pairs of black Normandy's, but mine had no distressing on the leather, but the sole edge seemed a little rough.  Nothing that some edge dressing didn't take care of.  The leather is soooooooo supple.  

 

I have nothing against the Sturgis, but somehow I feel you could do better in another brand and get a pretty similar look.

I love the Normandy also and it seems after the initial rollout they really backed off scuffing the Brown...my pair has virtually none. If the MTO program were alive and well I would have more Normandy...the Sturgis 2 is a really nice boot, with a nice unique leather...honestly on clearance for $217 that is a gread deal...the sole is the downer on that boot for me but that is easily fixed when it comes time for a resole-

post #1263 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buster Brown View Post


If we're talking 'instant' results then, yes, stripping and re-dyeing is the only way to go from a dark to light shade. If you have a longer (i.e. years) timeline, using the lighter polish is not superfluous. Here is a pic my 'old' chili Delray next to dark chili:



I allowed them to lighten by mixing applications of chili shoe cream with walnut, mid tan and even neutral cream and wax. I also used some dark brown and black on the burnishing. I'm currently doing something similar with my dark chili Bleecker Street. It will probably be a couple years before I even notice anything and another few years before they settle into the desired shade.

Firstly, nice patina on the Delray. 

 

Secondly, what you say is true. I stand corrected to some degree, as the pigment in the cream (and to a lesser extent polish) can in fact slowly dye the leather over time. Additionally, polish and conditioner have an abrasive that will remove the darker burnishing over a long period time with brushing, and the lighter polish will fill in more worn areas with the new color, thus working to lighten the shoe over time as well. My primary issue is with the use of "just" when referring to the lightening of a shoe's color. A consistent use of a lighter shoe cream can indeed work to lighten the shoes color, but not to the extent that I would ever recommend buying a darker shoe several shades lighter than the actual color I desire. I must appreciate the color as is, even if I panned on seeing it lighten a bit over time. And I certainly wouldn't bank on being able to get back to the leather's original color prior to having been burnished, which seems to be what the OP suggested. 

 

Also, I'd be interested in seeing how different the Delray looked completely stripped down at this point. Not that I'm suggesting you do so, but if you ever do strip the Delray, let me know the difference. I would be curious to know if it was visibly more than a half shade darker underneath.  

post #1264 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by shades9323 View Post
 

Is there a resource that lists all models (new and old) by last?

Another good resource can be found at http://content.allenedmonds.com/pdf/ShoeCareReference.pdf by clicking here. This is several years old, but it provides a great deal of information beyond just the last.

post #1265 of 17564
post #1266 of 17564
Walnut dalton / Dainite sole from Shoebank, scored for 197. No major defects according to my eyes.


post #1267 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Is that the 2.0? Shell?

post #1268 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

Is that the 2.0? Shell?

Regular 1.0, black shell.
post #1269 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by ace13x View Post
 

 

 

 

Here:

 

http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?64989-Allen-Edmonds-Styles-vs-Lasts

 

Original list at the top.  Scroll down for a longer/updated list.

 

Edit:  Please note, AE sometimes reuses names.  So some older shoes look to be on different lasts because they are in fact a different shoe.

 

Thank you. I did find a lot of re-use of names when searching the bay for 7 last shoes!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by smfdoc View Post
 

Another good resource can be found at http://content.allenedmonds.com/pdf/ShoeCareReference.pdf by clicking here. This is several years old, but it provides a great deal of information beyond just the last.

 

 

Thank you for the resource.

post #1270 of 17564
A few Normandy shots....was brewing some coffee so I figured it was pepper time



post #1271 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buster Brown View Post

If we're talking 'instant' results then, yes, stripping and re-dyeing is the only way to go from a dark to light shade. If you have a longer (i.e. years) timeline, using the lighter polish is not superfluous. Here is a pic my 'old' chili Delray next to dark chili:



I allowed them to lighten by mixing applications of chili shoe cream with walnut, mid tan and even neutral cream and wax. I also used some dark brown and black on the burnishing. I'm currently doing something similar with my dark chili Bleecker Street. It will probably be a couple years before I even notice anything and another few years before they settle into the desired shade.
what's that bike toe brogue on the left?
post #1272 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

A few Normandy shots....was brewing some coffee so I figured it was pepper time
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


 

Damn you, @Kahuna75. Now I want a pair. And some coffee too! 

post #1273 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarlet View Post


what's that bike toe brogue on the left?

I just saw someone in MSP with that exact shoe on.  Crazy.

post #1274 of 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by smfdoc View Post

As a follow up to my question, I have now received the Rutledge shoes and they are, indeed, roomier and they fit very similar to a 201 last. By this, I mean, they are not too tight in the vamp and they seem a bit on the long side. I think that is just part of the sleekness they try to obtain with the 333. . . . I also agree with those who have noticed a distinct difference in feel of the leather quality and lamb skin lining in the Independence line. Quite nice to the touch. Thanks again for the insight and the member who told me to grab them. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Really like the restrained burnishing on those. Most of the seconds seem to be that way because they were violently assaulted by a mad burnisher.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SLCRich View Post

Warwick in oxblood. Comfortable enough to sleep in. I wouldn't...but maybe? Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Sexy shoes, love my oxblood Warwicks. Vast expanse of cherry calf = sultry.
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post

Unspoilered for sheer badassery. I erred by not picking up a pair of those for $399. I shall regret it.
post #1275 of 17564

 

Overall I was impressed by the store.  I ended up (over)stocking up on care supplies and trees. Trees were $16.95, and care and cleaning were 15% off.   As others have pointed out, Paramus is not most easily accessible place to put a store, and they are not open on Sunday (no stores in Paramus are open on Sunday).  If you enter the Mall through Nordstrom Rack and exit that store out the back, AE is the first store on your left at the top of the escalator.   Seems to be a pretty decent mall (Nordstrom Rack, Bloomingdales Outlet, Neiman Marcus Last Call etc.), but I didn't stick around to check it out.

Are shoe care supplies 15% off everywhere? Or, just at the Paramus store.

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