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How do I obtain this fit?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

My issue is that on nearly every shirt I have, no matter what I do, I cannot figure out how to get rid of the shirt under arm "wings" when I spread out my shirt.  See this image:

 

 

 

My ideal fit is one that follows the chest, but isn't tight, yet allows me to raise my arms above my head without pulling tremendously at the waist...as it stands with these shirts, I can't even lift my arms parallel to the ground with it pulling up my entire shirt.  I don't know what to do, but my ideal goal is to obtain this fit and I can't figure out how to obtain such a close fitting armpit to allow for ease of movement without it being so tight as well:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks

post #2 of 21

Looks like you need higher armholes. If my memory serves me right that is a Proper Cloth shirt. Try selecting Tailored under Shoulder/Armpit fit if you haven't already.

post #3 of 21

Yes, you need higher armholes; Depending on your budget, there are different options: I find my Turnbull & Asser shirts have decent armholes, try Ledbury too, they have decent armholes.

post #4 of 21

Also, take note of the angle your sleeves are attached at - if you want greater mobility, you want the sleeves to sit at a right angle to the rest of the shirt instead of an acute angle.  There are two solutions to this problem.  The first would be to have a tailor add a gusset panel to the underarm section (inadvisable, too much work for too little return and will make your shirt look like patchwork), and the second would be to just have the shirts made.  Whether the armpits are high or low doesn't actually matter so much as the sleeve angle.  If you get your sleeves attached like the letter T, this should do the trick.

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadAngle View Post

Also, take note of the angle your sleeves are attached at - if you want greater mobility, you want the sleeves to sit at a right angle to the rest of the shirt instead of an acute angle.  There are two solutions to this problem.  The first would be to have a tailor add a gusset panel to the underarm section (inadvisable, too much work for too little return and will make your shirt look like patchwork), and the second would be to just have the shirts made.  Whether the armpits are high or low doesn't actually matter so much as the sleeve angle.  If you get your sleeves attached like the letter T, this should do the trick.

Alright but how is my shirt not attached at a T? I'm looking now and the armholes definitely don't look much different?
post #6 of 21

Basically, if you laid the shirt flat, you should be able to stick a long pole or a broom handle through one sleeve and out the other without the shoulders crumpling.

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadAngle View Post

Basically, if you laid the shirt flat, you should be able to stick a long pole or a broom handle through one sleeve and out the other without the shoulders crumpling.

Would you know any online MTM companies or in person that are able to do this? Luxire?
post #8 of 21
Just buy a proper shirt
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrem View Post

Just buy a proper shirt

 

 

Good thing you came out of lurking for this helpful piece of advice.

post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teknique22 View Post


Would you know any online MTM companies or in person that are able to do this? Luxire?

Any MTM companies that do this?

post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 

Anyone?

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by teknique22 View Post
 

Anyone?

 

Luxire is probably a good bet. What I would do, personally, is follow Luxire's instructions to measure that shirt and use those EXACT measurements on the order form of your Luxire shirt. Put a note in the comments that an e-mail is being sent with further instructions and to hold off on the garment until that e-mail is reviewed. Then, take a picture of the shirt laying flat, buttoned up, with the arms extended at the natural angle. Include that picture as well as the photos you've posted here illustrating your problem, and let them advise you on the necessary adjustments to correct it. Let them make the adjustments from the measurements you provided, and then also alter the angle of the arms at their discretion.

 

Alternatively, send the photos via e-mail first and ask for advice prior to placing your first order. This will take around a week or so, in my experience, but you can copy and paste the info from their reply directly into the comments field of the order.

post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flvinny521 View Post

Luxire is probably a good bet. What I would do, personally, is follow Luxire's instructions to measure that shirt and use those EXACT measurements on the order form of your Luxire shirt. Put a note in the comments that an e-mail is being sent with further instructions and to hold off on the garment until that e-mail is reviewed. Then, take a picture of the shirt laying flat, buttoned up, with the arms extended at the natural angle. Include that picture as well as the photos you've posted here illustrating your problem, and let them advise you on the necessary adjustments to correct it. Let them make the adjustments from the measurements you provided, and then also alter the angle of the arms at their discretion.

Alternatively, send the photos via e-mail first and ask for advice prior to placing your first order. This will take around a week or so, in my experience, but you can copy and paste the info from their reply directly into the comments field of the order.

Is this even a thing? Do high quality shirts have the wing issue? I'm just trying to figure out if this is a problem I'm imagining or if truly custom shirts do not have this issue
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by teknique22 View Post
 
 

Is this even a thing? Do high quality shirts have the wing issue? I'm just trying to figure out if this is a problem I'm imagining or if truly custom shirts do not have this issue

 

I'm certainly no expert, but I don't think you can say definitively that shirts at a higher price point would not have a specific fit issue. Fit is the result of how the pattern of a shirt coincides with the body of the wearer, so I'm sure you could find a perfect fitting $10 Sears clearance shirt, and conversely, a high end shirt that looks like a mess.

post #15 of 21
I am assuming you had the shirt in the photos made for you.
it has too much taper from Chest to Waist.

RTW shirts of any quality do not have that much taper from chest to waist.

that is why you have "wings"
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