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Help me pick a digital SLR camera. - Page 2

post #16 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD View Post
Okay first off, to be incredibly blunt, never, ever use the LCD screen on the back of the camera to take pictures. That's simply not photography.



Another note on the D40. It doesn't capture images in raw format. So if you want the full power of post processing in raw (which is pretty important) the D80 is the way to go.

I just got my girlfriend one for Xmas. Lucky her.

Personally, I use a D70.
post #17 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
All valid points. For the sake of my argument I will agree to say that it's partially based on personal experience and tastes. After all Cartier-Bresson disliked SLR's completely and would never dream of using one; whilst others are completely unable to use non-SLR cameras.

Indeed, late in life Cartier-Bresson gave up using rangefinders and started using a Minilux P&S. Still took some good shots IIRC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post

I believe you are looking for a camera with interchangeable lenses that project directly onto the sensor which in turn transmits that data onto an LCD screen.


Actually, I prefer an optical viewfinder almost all of the time because it isn't subject to glare and it keeps the camera braced against the forehead instead of at arms' length. But sometimes I do wish I had a pivoting finder. The Four-Thirds SLRs from Olympus and Panasonic do have live view LCDs, but I don't have the cash now to start building a 4/3 system from the ground up. Panasonic has one excellent lens--the stabilized Leica-branded zoom--but I am a primes kind of guy and the 4/3 prime lenses are too expensive for me.

I'm using a Pentax K100D now because I had several K-mount lenses from my film days, and I think the Pentax primes are some of the best around. I like the ability to turn older primes into stabilized lenses with body-based IS.
post #18 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
P.S. Regarding the Leica comment I think you are mistaking us with LabelKing.

No, though I suppose I may be comparing you to him.
post #19 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by retronotmetro View Post
No, though I suppose I may be comparing you to him.

Well, I said "˜us' since you included Brian in that comment. And I don't think either of us can be mistaken for him, because frankly our prose is entirely different.

Jon.
post #20 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
Well, I said "˜us' since you included Brian in that comment. And I don't think either of us can be mistaken for him, because frankly our prose is entirely different.

Jon.

Huh? Unless I'm mistaken, both you and Brian made "use the viewfinder or it isn't real photography" type statements. I responded by stating that such a statement is not dissimilar in its rigidity to statements made by Leica nuts who bitch about (among other things) the M7 not being a real camera because it has autoexposure. I was simply reflecting on your absolutism, not calling you or Brian Leica nuts.

I do not believe that you or Brian are among the aforementioned Leica nuts. I believe that LabelKing may be one of the Leica nuts, but he can certainly speak for himself.
post #21 of 113
The live viewfinder (on the screen) is now finding it's way onto DSLR cameras, the new Canon 1DS Mark III, which is the highest Canon you can buy has it now. I prefer to view in the viewfinder on DSLR's because I feel more connected to the camera. With my old Powershot G4 it had a great swivel out screen that was incredibly useful in taking group shots, photos of myself and my girl, and for taking photos at weird angles. I could see how it could be a help in judging some shots in a DSLR and is useful as another feature set to help get the final shot. I think good photos can be taken with any decent camera, however DSLR's give you a much greater advantage of taking good shots because they have a much larger feature set.
post #22 of 113
I don't really find the "feature set" of DSLRs to be their greatest advantage, unless you include "high quality" in that.. The strength of an SLR camera comes from the lenses and the sensors; I've always been a proponent of the motto "quality over quantity" and that's what you get from an SLR over a P&S. I'd be completely satisfied with an SLR that lacked all of the in-camera processing features and other nifty computer functions that are so often used as selling points, so long as it had a great sensor and viewfinder and could use my favorite lenses (though I love on-screen histograms, doubt I could live without one at this point). Anyway, I didn't mean to pick on the actual medium of street photography or rangefinders. My comments were kind of a rant against the generic lazy photography that everyone seems to make a hobby these days. To be honest I don't give a shit what equipment is used so long as the composition and the spirit of the photo is good. My opinions are mostly for my own standards, I'd hate to find the perfect moment for a photo and have it ruined by noise, bad color representation, distortion and poor focus. BTW, I'm anti-Leica.
post #23 of 113
What BrianSD said in his original post. I'm absolutely enamored with my D80. I researched for months though, before I made the purchase.
post #24 of 113
I think the advice on the lenses is spot on. I have been using ED lenses from Nikon with my F100 for 12 years and they take beautiful pics. The kit lenses are not horrible but best to put the money elsewhere.

I have used the D80 which a friend has and it is very nice. We use it for car detailing shots where we need lots of resolution.
post #25 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by montecristo#4 View Post

Another note on the D40. It doesn't capture images in raw format. So if you want the full power of post processing in raw (which is pretty important) the D80 is the way to go.

This isn't correct. Both the D40 and D40X have NEF (Nikon RAW) capability.

Another couple of options in the OP's price range are the Pentaxes: K10D, K100D Super. Decent kit lenses, lots of good used lenses on the market (same is true of Nikon), though prices are definitely rising. Both cameras have good weather sealing, great build quality for the money, and in-body image stabilization. K10D has the same Sony 10MP sensor as the D80, though arguably lower image quality, but the differences shouldn't really be apparent for 8x10 and under.
post #26 of 113
IIRC Pentax shares quite a bit of hardware with Nikons (I recall hearing they can even use some Nikon lenses, though I'm not sure). The photographer who shot my sister's wedding had some sort of Pentax/Nikon hybrid. I was really confused about it, but the pictures came out very well.
post #27 of 113
I'm not one of those militant Leica cultists with the matching Leica brass belt buckle (they exist) and a Leica baseball cap (they also exist), but I do appreciate their cameras, lenses and accessories. In my opinion, there are few cameras that can exceed the convenience, mechanical refinement and sheer esthetics of a Leica--whether M or LTM--for street photography. A Zeiss Contax comes closes, but for my tastes, I feel they're better for more static subjects. My other favorite camera is the Rolleiflex TLR. As for the viewfinder issue, I always preset my aperture/speed and then use a separate viewfinder--as Cartier Bresson sometimes preferred--to take the shots.
post #28 of 113
I'm in the market as well, and despite all the praise for the D80, what does it offer over the D40x for the absolute beginnner to real photography? I am starting from scratch here wanting to take the plunge as a hobbyist, does it make sense to purchase just the body of whatever (likely the D40x or D80) and get the lens separately, or is their a Nikon kit lens that is a good value (as I believe Brian SD stated)? I will also need to get some software (is Lightroom the way to go or is there a more economical option?) and I don't want this to turn into a $1000+ endeavor.
post #29 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD View Post
IIRC Pentax shares quite a bit of hardware with Nikons (I recall hearing they can even use some Nikon lenses, though I'm not sure). The photographer who shot my sister's wedding had some sort of Pentax/Nikon hybrid. I was really confused about it, but the pictures came out very well.

Pentax and Nikkor lenses do not share a mount configuration and cannot be cross-mounted without some kind of jerry-rigged mount adapter. If you do that you will lose the lens-to-body focal distance transmission necessary to optimize flash metering, and you may have difficulty focusing at infinity. I would love to be able to use my Pentax Limiteds on a Nikon body but it isn't worth the effort.
post #30 of 113
Well, if my word isn't enough, here's an overwhelmingly positive review from Ken Rockwell on the 18-55 nikon kit lens: http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/1855.htm I personally think the D40x is fine - a great deal in fact, just knowing what I know and having experience with the D80, its worth the extra money to me.
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