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Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about. - Page 194

post #2896 of 3538
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliq View Post

Is there anyone in Sydney that can make handmade button holes? I've picked up a couple of suits that have unfinished sleeves.

My go to guy has recently moved to Melbourne so i'm looking for a suitable replacement.

Varnavas C Classic Tailoring.

Great guy - however I believe he may have problems on his eye sight. last few times(3 years ago ) myself and my friends used him always had uneven stitching. Couldn't even re fit buttons on jacket sleeves straight !
post #2897 of 3538
Quote:
Originally Posted by md2010 View Post

Varnavas C Classic Tailoring.

Great guy - however I believe he may have problems on his eye sight. last few times(3 years ago ) myself and my friends used him always had uneven stitching. Couldn't even re fit buttons on jacket sleeves straight !

Is this a referral for who not to go to?
post #2898 of 3538
^One of Bijan's apprentices does amazing button holes. Shoot me a PM.
post #2899 of 3538
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayH View Post

^One of Bijan's apprentices does amazing button holes. Shoot me a PM.

 

I think I know who you're talking about. PM sent.

post #2900 of 3538
Zink & Sons can also do handmade buttonholes if I remember correctly.
post #2901 of 3538
Good deal on the Barbour Bedale @ $269, from David Jones of all places. More sizes in store.

http://shop.davidjones.com.au/djs/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10051&langId=-1&productId=3748005&storeId=10051
post #2902 of 3538
Quote:
Originally Posted by md2010 View Post

Varnavas C Classic Tailoring.

Great guy - however I believe he may have problems on his eye sight. last few times(3 years ago ) myself and my friends used him always had uneven stitching. Couldn't even re fit buttons on jacket sleeves straight !

I've had mixed results there.
post #2903 of 3538
Hi,

I have an M.J. Bale Samurai Suit in grey blue glen plaid size 42/36 for sale. Made in Japan by Ring Jacket with full canvas construction. Literally worn once a year ago. Has sat in my wardrobe since. Was listed as a drop 7, but feels a little closer to a drop 8.

Getting married next month - Originally $1300, pickup or drop off in the Sydney CBD for $650.

Also have a pair of Crocket and Jones Westfield's in dark brown calf size 10F for sale. Like new with some shop scuffs on the sole.

Originally $650, pickup or drop off in the Sydney CBD for $325.

If you come and pick them both up from my joint - $900.

Cheers.




post #2904 of 3538
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post
 

 

 

It appears that you might be having issues with certain aspects of marketing, not marketing per se. 

 

After all, getting word out to the public that a product/service exists, is also part of marketing. Surely the knowledge that something you desire actually exists adds value to you, rather than detract from it?

 

I get the gist of what you are saying though. But I reckon you might have cast the net too far on your first go. That's no biggie.

post #2905 of 3538

That's quite fair.

post #2906 of 3538
Quote:
Originally Posted by lachyzee View Post

Good deal on the Barbour Bedale @ $269, from David Jones of all places. More sizes in store.

http://shop.davidjones.com.au/djs/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10051&langId=-1&productId=3748005&storeId=10051
it's duck shooting season already?
post #2907 of 3538

post #2908 of 3538
Quack.

post #2909 of 3538
Charles Tyrwhitt pays $10,800 ACCC fine for misleading pricing on shirts Lucy Cormack THE AGE

When a store compares a "was" price to a "now" price, it can be the difference between a shopper purchasing something and not. The only problem is, what if the product was never actually purchased for the original price?

The practice is known as two-price comparison advertising, and this week it left a London-based clothing manufacturer and retailer paying a penalty of more than $10,000.

The Charles Tyrwhitt shirt which was advertised at once being $160 despite no consumer ever having paid that price.

Charles Tyrwhitt LLP sells men's and women's shirts, business clothing and accessories which are advertised extensively online and in printed catalogue inserts in Australian newspapers and magazines. The brand, which spruiks "exemplary customer service, with smashing prices and a pinch of British charm thrown in for good measure," is known for its deal-based offers, like its set of four shirts for $199. But following an investigation by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, the retailer was issued a $10,800 penalty and an infringement notice for contravening the Australian Consumer Law with its "was/now" pricing practices in the sale of at least 737 business shirts.

The ACCC found Charles Tyrwhitt had made a false or misleading representation in relation to the "was" price of a men's "slim fit non-iron micro-spot white" shirt on its website, between February 2016 and March 2016.

Charles Tyrwhitt LLP sells men's and women's shirts, business clothing and accessories which are advertised extensively online and in catalogue inserts.


The shirt was advertised with a "was" price of $160 and a "now" price of $69, however the "was" price had only been advertised for a short period in a section of the Charles Tyrwhitt website which was difficult to locate, and no consumer had ever purchased the shirt at that price.

The ACCC determined that the pricing falsely represented to consumers that by purchasing the shirt there would be a saving, when that was not the case.


.
The retailer is popular for its multi-shirt deals.
"Was/now price representations are likely to be misleading if the products have not been sold at the 'was' price for a reasonable period immediately before the sale or 'now' price is offered," said ACCC Commissioner Sarah Court. "Comparative advertising can be a powerful marketing tool but it is essential that retailers ensure that any advertised savings are real, truthful and accurate." Ms Court said the enforcement action against Charles Tyrwhitt served as a reminder to overseas businesses that supplying products to Australian consumers required that they comply with Australian regulations.

Australian consumer law states that businesses that use two-price comparison advertising, like "was/now" prices, "strike through" or indicating a particular dollar amount or percentage saving, must ensure consumers are not misled about the potential savings.

Charles Tyrwhitt did not respond to a request for comment.
post #2910 of 3538
serves them right. they're also pretty annoying with their marketing too - constant hardcopy junk mail
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Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about.