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Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about. - Page 142

post #2116 of 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post



Is there a tl;dr version of this?

 



Shop online using an i-device and you'll pay a higher price...
post #2117 of 3822
Some fantastic posts in the past week.

Great to see the thread spark up.
post #2118 of 3822

Thanks crdb again for another great piece. I'm still new to this area and it's really helpful to me. The use cases for Machine Learning you mentioned, particularly the 'dark hat' one, are really interesting. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by crdb View Post

Most companies don't have a big data problem. And when I say most companies I mean virtually all companies. We crawl 2.5 million pages daily, serve the site off the same server, and also run our consulting business page and various other things, all for $5/month on vultr.com. We haven't even hit 2% utilisation yet with thousands of visitors, and we're in the top 5% fastest sites in Australia apparently. Yeah, if you're Facebook or Google you might truly have a "big data" problem, but even a company with tens of millions of customers does not. And you can go very far with a single PostgreSQL server.

 

 

I think some big companies with lots of end users, like banks, supermarkets, telcos have already applied, or at least, experimented with, big data to their business, including the one I'm working for. But I think you are right that Big Data and Machine Learning are still so new that people probably are still trying to figure out what to do with the data they have. Hopefully things will pick up quickly soon. I find BD and MC challenging but more interesting than pure software development. I've started learning Spark and played a bit with the Tensorflow library and will see how things will be going. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post


uhoh.gif
 

Lol I thought the previous book that crdb shared is for you, so...

 

To go back to the topic, it has been raining all day pretty much every day of this week in Melbourne so far. Now that I have just bought a few new pairs of quality shoes, I wonder what do you guys usually do to protect your beautiful dress shoes? Overshoes or wearing some sort of boots on the road and then swapping to dress shoes in the office? I'm thinking of buying some Tingley or Totes overshoes from Amazon, but don't know if it's better to go for the Swims or something else.

post #2119 of 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post


Is there a tl;dr version of this?
Oli's ideal client brief:
Got drunk/stoned. Stole stuff. Got caught. Get me off.
post #2120 of 3822

@clayb, I have a few pairs of shoes with non-leather soles which I reserve mainly for rainy days. A couple of Dainites, a Victory, a Commando and a Tomir. (In case you're not familiar, these are the brand names of the sole types, not the shoes.)

 

If you get caught out in heavy rain with leather-soled shoes, it's not the end of the world. Just give them several days to dry out, perhaps stuffed with newspaper or that kitchen-roll paper (which is better than newsprint, as the latter may bleed ink into the shoe's lining when wetted). Do not force-dry them in any way.

 

Once you're sure they are completely 100% dry, recondition them overnight with something like Saphir Renovateur, then wax/polish them as normal. Should hopefully come up good as gold. But you must be VERY patient with the drying process.

post #2121 of 3822

@crdb, just wondering - if I shop online at one of these savvy sites using my MacBook, I'm likely to be given a higher price, right? OK. So how about if I use a VPN? Will this hide information regarding my device type?

 

I'm thinking, I should start using a VPN with (say) a Filipino server, then reset the currency to A$, or is that giving the game away?

 

Anybody with direct experience, preferably successful, using such techniques - please speak up.

post #2122 of 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by clayb View Post

 I find BD and MC challenging but more interesting than pure software development.

 

I've started learning Spark and played a bit with the Tensorflow library 

I'm going to be brief(er) because this is SF, not HN. That being said, I feel like after a few years and lessons learnt I ought to say this: if you master the computer science as opposed to the toys, in the long run you will have a better career.

 

When you say "Spark, Tensorflow" I'm hearing the same hard working young devs say "Hadoop, Map/Reduce" 5 years ago and so on. So first, why are you learning about distributed computing already? How big are your datasets, really? Because by going for distributed you are losing out on an enormous number of things, like provability (with SQL, dealing with data in a relational way, that's the set theory meets predicate logic way, not the ER diagrams way) or the man-centuries of research and libraries and implementations in something like R (or you'll limit yourself to whatever has already been written in the new paradigm).

 

In my case I was obsessed with getting neural nets to work on GPUs in Haskell. Never had a use case for the stuff, nor managers willing to put in the budget to basically rewrite entire R libraries from scratch in a parallel, GPU-friendly way. But I was damn sure it would make or break my career (it didn't).

 

On the other hand, I meet very few devs - maybe a few more in Australia than the rest of APAC - that are capable of thinking about databases declaratively, which is a great business opportunity for us as we're hired to clean up but which I find slightly sad since it's not hard to figure out. And I keep interviewing people who have "years of [insert big data framework du jour] experience" but can't tell me the difference between outliers and high leverage observations.

 

And the folks who can build an [insert framework] process, they build something which looks like work has been done and the smarter ones cherry pick good historical data to show the non-technical management progress and they hope to job hop or move into management before anybody notices. And people rarely notice, because most legacy codebases are giant spaghetti balls that nobody dares to touch in case existing stuff breaks. 

 

On the same subject: https://scottlocklin.wordpress.com/2015/08/28/advice-to-a-young-social-scientist/

 

\rant


Edited by crdb - 7/6/16 at 8:38am
post #2123 of 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post
 

@crdb, just wondering - if I shop online at one of these savvy sites using my MacBook, I'm likely to be given a higher price, right? OK. So how about if I use a VPN? Will this hide information regarding my device type?

 

I'm thinking, I should start using a VPN with (say) a Filipino server, then reset the currency to A$, or is that giving the game away?

 

Anybody with direct experience, preferably successful, using such techniques - please speak up.

It really depends on sites. I know some big AU sites that aren't bothering, either out of laziness or because they don't have the capability. On the other hand, American sites are more aggressive.

 

The best way to know is to try a few devices and figure out what they are detecting. It's usually pretty rough. I've seen prices jump up on the very listing I'm looking at on AirBNB after I log in... that's a major UX fail in my book. For what I buy, switching to a cheap old laptop with an older OS usually does the trick.

 

FWIW the Philippines is not necessarily the best idea, since that's the kind of country where a not insignificant number of customers are ultra-rich and the rest are on mobile devices. 

 

One more reliable way to reduce costs is to sign up to the newsletter of new outfits, since that's where a lot of the marketing money will go (it looks like you're "reactivating" customers and the voucher % is usually lower than the Adwords cost per order, and in some cases isn't even accounted for, so investors love it).

post #2124 of 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by crdb View Post
 

I still wear my Churches from a decade ago and they are doing fine. They've moulded to my foot and are quite comfortable now. 

 

The other thing about Churches is you can find some in Sydney or Melbourne, to try on. So you know your size and whether they are comfortable.

 

If I were in your shoes I'd go for Meermin, though; they're the cheapest decent choice I know of. Back in the days it was Markowski who allowed me to get more pairs for my budget. And I wear mine all the time these days.

 

Will be cross-posting this on the SOTD thread where it's a bit more relevant, but article on international prices post-Brexit finally done, although you've already seen 2/3 of it. Please let me know if you want to "know" anything else from our data, it will be a pleasure to dig: http://www.pricentile.com/article/did-brexit-make-british-retailers-competitive?a=48


I'm unfortunately very put off trying Meermin based on what I've read about their customer service.
 

And the risk of getting sizing wrong would appear quite high. Return shipping costs are steep and potential to resell at a reasonable recovery also seems risky, living in Australia as opposed to the US, for example.

 

Regarding the points made about Church's shoes, I would add that it's probably a great time to buy them from Herring if there's something there you like. Haven't worn them before myself, but I wouldn't be opposed to trying them either at current prices.

post #2125 of 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epicure View Post


I'm unfortunately very put off trying Meermin based on what I've read about their customer service.
 

And the risk of getting sizing wrong would appear quite high. Return shipping costs are steep and potential to resell at a reasonable recovery also seems risky, living in Australia as opposed to the US, for example.

 

Regarding the points made about Church's shoes, I would add that it's probably a great time to buy them from Herring if there's something there you like. Haven't worn them before myself, but I wouldn't be opposed to trying them either at current prices.

Ah, I basically assume there'll be no customer service and the shoes are non-returnable (or in other words: at least part of the premium with other brands pays for other people's customer service, which I'm not necessarily keen on). The way I priced it was P(wrong size) * cost which is 20% * $150 = $30, still less than the savings relative to other brands. My time (for the time taken to return the pair by mail) is worth more than the full price of the shoes anyway. 20% is conservative if you measure your foot well and read the thread on sizing - I got it right first time.

 

But are there any Australia businesses that sell shoes in even the same order of magnitude price with a Goodyear welted sole? 

 

Also are Meermins less likely to sell in Australia? I'd have thought there'd be a nice market for the things considering the lack of cheap options locally. 

post #2126 of 3822
Love my Church's.
post #2127 of 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

Love my Church's.

Me too...and I love my pairs too.
post #2128 of 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by crdb View Post
 

I'm going to be brief(er) because this is SF, not HN. That being said, I feel like after a few years and lessons learnt I ought to say this: if you master the computer science as opposed to the toys, in the long run you will have a better career.

 

 

 

Sorry for coming across like that. I didn't mean to try to learn Big Data stuff via those 'toys', they are just to give me the first taste of this emerging technology so that I can decide if it's for me or not. And I wholeheartedly with you that we should start with the basic and master it first. Personally I have problems with people who like to tell me web development equals to knowing some fancy frameworks like React etc.

 

Quote:
 How big are your datasets, really?

 

For some it can be billions of records. I'm not sure if that's big enough or not but the Big Data stack, while is still evolving, has been pretty much decided already.

 

Quote:
In my case I was obsessed with getting neural nets to work on GPUs in Haskell.  

 

Coincidentally, I have been eyeing the GTX 1080 for some experiments/personal projects, but will have to think through it first.

 

Quote:
 And I keep interviewing people who have "years of [insert big data framework du jour] experience" but can't tell me the difference between outliers and high leverage observations.

 

That's a surprise to me. I always thought removing outliers must be one the first things to do. I've been warned that a majority of time would be spent on cleaning up the data, not the interesting stuff like analysing, training, or modelling.  

 

Quote:

 And people rarely notice, because most legacy codebases are giant spaghetti balls that nobody dares to touch in case existing stuff breaks. 

 

I have experienced it :) C++ classes with thousands of lines and people keep adding new methods to them and no one dares, or bothers, to refactor the 20 year old code base. It's a text (e.g. NoSQL) database btw.

 

 

Interesting link. Also on the same subject, I know someone, who has a background in statistics, always complains to me that they don't have enough of knowledge of computer science to do the job good enough and I always have to assure them that their own knowledge is more important and that they only need to know the basic of CS to run commands and use the tools provided etc.

 

For me I guess I'm still at the exploration phase, pondering which area to dive into. Australia, imho, is not a very large market when it comes to IT, not to mention the outsourcing trend, and it's important to choose the right areas to stay relevant and competitive in the long term. Big Data seems to be one of them, and also is intellectually challenging, which is attractive to me. So I decide to give it a shot and will see how it goes. 


Edited by clayb - 7/7/16 at 8:21am
post #2129 of 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post
 

@clayb, I have a few pairs of shoes with non-leather soles which I reserve mainly for rainy days. A couple of Dainites, a Victory, a Commando and a Tomir. (In case you're not familiar, these are the brand names of the sole types, not the shoes.)

 

If you get caught out in heavy rain with leather-soled shoes, it's not the end of the world. Just give them several days to dry out, perhaps stuffed with newspaper or that kitchen-roll paper (which is better than newsprint, as the latter may bleed ink into the shoe's lining when wetted). Do not force-dry them in any way.

 

Once you're sure they are completely 100% dry, recondition them overnight with something like Saphir Renovateur, then wax/polish them as normal. Should hopefully come up good as gold. But you must be VERY patient with the drying process.

 

Thanks Coxsackie, it sounds like a lot of work to be done when you get caught in a heavy rain with your leather shoes. I'm going to topy most of my shoes, except maybe the C&J pair, to minimise the risk, but will probably also get a pair of waterproof boot or something similar with the sole types suggested.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crdb View Post
 

But are there any Australia businesses that sell shoes in even the same order of magnitude price with a Goodyear welted sole? 

 

There is Belmore. They happen to be having a sale right now too. I've never bought anything from them so am not sure if their shoes can be compared with Meermin or not, but they claim that the leather is full grain kangaroo. 

 

Quote:
 Also are Meermins less likely to sell in Australia? I'd have thought there'd be a nice market for the things considering the lack of cheap options locally. 

 

I'm afraid if they come to Australia, their price will not be as good as of now. We can just look at Loake

post #2130 of 3822
Anyone keen on two of Jason's knits?



Unworn. $75 for both.
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Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about.