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Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about. - Page 120

post #1786 of 3528
I have heard good things about Spice I Am, although I've never been...
post #1787 of 3528

So I'm just hoping to get some advice on a first suit for interview/wardrobe?

 

Would you buy an expensive suit or a couple of suits with the money you have when starting out?

post #1788 of 3528
Re Spice I am got there at 6.10 packed and 70 minute wait FTFAJ found a good Italian on Crown St.

And WTF is this thing about chicks of all ages wearing jeans ripped at the knees? Reached plague proportions last time I saw it was in the early 90's.

Thanks all for the Thai recommendations have listed them for next time. Sadly Canberra does not do Thai IMHO.
post #1789 of 3528
Few times I went to spice I am - I was there prior to 5pm to queue up. It's almost always packed. My wife is originally from Thailand and rate this as one of the few authentic Thai restaurants in Sydney. Apparently most Thai traveling celebrities are regularly seen there!
post #1790 of 3528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

Re Spice I am got there at 6.10 packed and 70 minute wait FTFAJ found a good Italian on Crown St.
 

 

Isn't Spice I Am now a chain, with a few different venues? I thought that there were a few of them scattered around Sydney?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

And WTF is this thing about chicks of all ages wearing jeans ripped at the knees? Reached plague proportions last time I saw it was in the early 90's.
 

 

Unfortunately, GF, pre-faded and pre-distressed jeans are back in a big way, and stupid people are willing to pay large sums of money for them:

 

http://www.gq.com/story/fear-of-god-jeans-celebs

 

[Please exercise caution when reading the above article, as you brain may be bleeding by the time you finish.] 

post #1791 of 3528
[quote name="Journeyman" url="/t/518027/australian-members-part-ii-if-you-read-the-first-post-youll-get-what-this-is-all-about/1770#post_8470213"
Unfortunately, GF, pre-faded and pre-distressed jeans are back in a big way, and stupid people are willing to pay large sums of money for them:

http://www.gq.com/story/fear-of-god-jeans-celebs

[Please exercise caution when reading the above article, as you brain may be bleeding by the time you finish.] 
[/quote]

As the Ancient Chinese curse says "may you live in interesting times." Indeed we are JM indeed we are.
post #1792 of 3528
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonoWillz View Post
 

So I'm just hoping to get some advice on a first suit for interview/wardrobe?

 

Would you buy an expensive suit or a couple of suits with the money you have when starting out?

There's an enormous amount of advice already out there, including on this forum, and there's no point repeating it.

 

However, I'd add (based on my own mistakes back in the days):

- if you're going to wear a suit to work (finance, accounting, etc.), favour comfort over perceived quality. And don't just buy one, you're going to need to rotate. If you're going to travel a lot (e.g. strategy consulting) go for something that does not crease easily.

- if it's just your interview/weddings/reunion dinner suit and you'll work in "smart casual" (most offices today) or in a tech startup, you can get away with only owning one and being careful with it, and spending a bit more.

- bring someone experienced and with a good eye with you when you shop for the thing. Preferably male and older, the uncle in your family that's a successful businessman or whatever. Second opinion, sanity check, and help with things like fit which you need experience to really understand.

- nobody really cares about fashion so long as your shirt is clean and your suit isn't made out of purple polyester. In a couple of years you'll have more disposable income. Don't sweat it now!

 

In Australia, I'd head for MJ Bale outlets first. Best value for money I've seen yet outside op shops, at least for the stuff that is properly discounted. Their shirts are not worth it (IMO). Uniqlo shirts are fine and cost nothing in the discount bin. 

 

Best of luck with the interviews. The first job is the toughest to get because you have no experience and there's a few hundred other people who look just like you applying for the same jobs, it will get easier afterwards. 

post #1793 of 3528
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

Bought a Filson medium duffle. Cost me $510.

Stupid AUD.

Jesus. I paid $210 landed just under two years ago.

It's a great bag and I'm sure you'll be happy.
post #1794 of 3528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhound View Post

Jesus. I paid $210 landed just under two years ago.

It's a great bag and I'm sure you'll be happy.

I paid $345 from an Australian retailer a year and a bit ago, unfortunately the size is too small for anything over a night or so.

Couldn't find an Aus retailer with a medium size, even internationally they're low on stock.
post #1795 of 3528
Quote:
Originally Posted by crdb View Post
 

There's an enormous amount of advice already out there, including on this forum, and there's no point repeating it.

 

However, I'd add (based on my own mistakes back in the days):

- if you're going to wear a suit to work (finance, accounting, etc.), favour comfort over perceived quality. And don't just buy one, you're going to need to rotate. If you're going to travel a lot (e.g. strategy consulting) go for something that does not crease easily.

- if it's just your interview/weddings/reunion dinner suit and you'll work in "smart casual" (most offices today) or in a tech startup, you can get away with only owning one and being careful with it, and spending a bit more.

- bring someone experienced and with a good eye with you when you shop for the thing. Preferably male and older, the uncle in your family that's a successful businessman or whatever. Second opinion, sanity check, and help with things like fit which you need experience to really understand.

- nobody really cares about fashion so long as your shirt is clean and your suit isn't made out of purple polyester. In a couple of years you'll have more disposable income. Don't sweat it now!

 

In Australia, I'd head for MJ Bale outlets first. Best value for money I've seen yet outside op shops, at least for the stuff that is properly discounted. Their shirts are not worth it (IMO). Uniqlo shirts are fine and cost nothing in the discount bin. 

 

Best of luck with the interviews. The first job is the toughest to get because you have no experience and there's a few hundred other people who look just like you applying for the same jobs, it will get easier afterwards. 


WOW! Thank you for such an in-depth reply. Your advice has been extremely helpful. Thank you!

 

By the way, in a field where suits are the norm and you purchase a couple of suits to rotate. Would you purchase same design or varying designs. 

post #1796 of 3528
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonoWillz View Post


WOW! Thank you for such an in-depth reply. Your advice has been extremely helpful. Thank you!

 

By the way, in a field where suits are the norm and you purchase a couple of suits to rotate. Would you purchase same design or varying designs. 

You're welcome. 

 

I would stick with a plain charcoal, plain navy (dark is better than light), and subtle self-pattern charcoal or navy depending on what you prefer (I prefer navy but always end up buying charcoal, go figure). But if on a budget go with what's on sale at the outlet even if it's a little more adventurous (e.g. SUBTLE navy pinstripe). It's safe and many argue, the most elegant there is (beauty in restraint, etc.).

 

In some professions and countries (not sure if Australia is the case), deviating might get you sent home to change, particularly if it's really visible - a light windowpane that's invisible past half a meter might just pass the accountant test, but not a bold light purple ropestripe. A navy suit with crisp white shirt with or without tie will look really neat and professional in virtually every case which is why it's the uniform of choice of almost all politicians (most recently, see photos of Sadiq Khan, the new London Mayor). Single breasted with notch lapels of course (the Tom Ford look in Suits is too bold) and personally I prefer 2 buttons.

 

The optimal recommended number of suits is 5-10 but no fresh graduate I know could afford that many (I couldn't). Two will get you a long way, three if you can afford it. Don't forget you'll pay a few dollars to get them altered - nothing drastic like changing the shape of the shoulder but definitely take in the waist ($40?), and fit the trousers so they have a light or no break ($15 at the MJ Bale outlet in the Western Suburbs in Sydney) - this because a heavy break means more trouser hanging at the back of your shoe picking up dirt, getting stepped on if you wear thin heels, etc (if it's cold wear thicker socks). The fit is by far the most important thing.

 

This is pretty much the standard advice on all the threads/books/articles, I read it when I was an undergraduate, ignored it and ended up with a bunch of suits I couldn't really wear after graduation (although they were great for dinner as a student). There's a beautiful DB POW check with light blue windowpane which I miss particularly, but I must have worn it three times.

 

Also, get at least two pairs of pants with each suit. Even the nice heavy fabrics wear away quickly, and you'll find whatever colour you bought doesn't exist anywhere anymore (it's never quite the same charcoal/navy). You can either rotate, or keep the "nice" one for days where you need to look neat; the problem with the second strategy is that your jacket will age faster than the "kept aside" pants and might end up a subtly different colour. Nobody will really care but it can be really stressful* if you're fashion conscious. 

 

On fabrics, the Instagram lot and many of the classic dressers love birdseye but I've found it has a nasty tendency to snag on stuff at which point you have a few strings of white or contrast light colour poking out of the suit, making it look decidedly worn (and no, the "English Country House look" is not appropriate for a professional services graduate - these stylistic statements are for men who are already established). It also loves to crease incredibly fast and it's a bit of a sportier look (less formal). A sharkskin or herringbone will last longer looking neat. 

 

* Want stressful? try thinking about whether you're showing the same amount of shirt cuff on both sides. 

post #1797 of 3528
Carriageworks has Bjork Digital till the 18th June. Mind blowing the last VR exhibit reminds me of something I may or may not have ingested in the 70's. Free just book online.
post #1798 of 3528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

I paid $345 from an Australian retailer a year and a bit ago, unfortunately the size is too small for anything over a night or so.

Couldn't find an Aus retailer with a medium size, even internationally they're low on stock.
Selling the small bag?
post #1799 of 3528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liber View Post

Selling the small bag?

I'll be selling it and some shoes in the coming days.
post #1800 of 3528
Thread Starter 

What's the general consensus about Italian Driving shoes? I recall reading that they're a waste of money as they don't last?

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Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about.