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Most versatile brown shoes

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

I was told that cap-toe oxfords are the most important shoes to have.

I have that sorted but I'm trying to figure out my second pair of shoes. Im in my late 20's.

1. If you could only own two pairs of dress shoes which would you chose for your 2nd pair after black oxfords? Of course they would need to be versatile so you can wear them in as many combinations as possible.

2. Which do you think are more versatile light brown or dark brown? (or would you chose another color)

 

 

I'm considering the following 3 pairs from Loake and they are listed from most preferred to least from the top.

http://www.loake.co.uk/bystyle/brogues/6018-calf-brogue.html 

http://www.loake.co.uk/byrange/web-exclusives/lewis.html

http://www.loake.co.uk/byrange/l1/200.html

 

Thank you very much!

 

 

3. BTW regarding the 2nd pair, can it be worn with a navy suit? 

post #2 of 24
Are you only wearing it with suits? If not, then my AE Kenilworth's (dark brown plain toe blucher) is my versatile shoe and would be my shoe of choice if I could only own two (although burgundy cap toe oxford would be the other shoe if I had a two shoe rotation).
post #3 of 24
Ralph Lauren Marlow wingtip bluchers are my most versatile shoes. Though you'd be on eBay to find these at a reasonable price today. Overall, I think darker brown is more versatile than light brown.
post #4 of 24

I'm afraid there is no such thing as 'most versatile' in the abstract.  It very much depends on the rest of your wardrobe and the context in which you'll be wearing the shoes.

 

If you haven't already done so, I suggest you post your query here:

 

http://www.styleforum.net/t/515866/new-member-inquiries-quick-questions-classic-menswear-wk-of-jan-11-2016/45#post_8281413

 

A very knowledgeable moderator will reply.

 

Good luck.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #5 of 24
Get the balmoral wingtip in dark brown: it's really not that dark anyway. It will look great with navy trousers, medium grays, and some shades of beige and stone. It's sleek enough to look good with city suits, and casual enough to be worn with jeans. A blucher would be better for jeans, but if you mainly wear suit trousers and slacks, then I'd get the balmoral.
post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testudo_Aubreii View Post

Get the balmoral wingtip in dark brown: it's really not that dark anyway. It will look great with navy trousers, medium grays, and some shades of beige and stone. It's sleek enough to look good with city suits, and casual enough to be worn with jeans. A blucher would be better for jeans, but if you mainly wear suit trousers and slacks, then I'd get the balmoral.

Agreed. Dark brown is not the most impressive on first sight, but I found it to be the most versatile, much more than light brown.
post #7 of 24

If you want any real level of formality it will have to be dark brown and especially if to be worn with navy.

 

I like brogues but they'd be a touch too informal for me where as a toecap shoe with just some punching rather than full brogue (eg G&G St James II) is able to span the formality better. That said, if you have the upper end of formality ticked and want something that more covers the lower end then a wingtip could be fine.

post #8 of 24
P.S.If you can, you might consider jumping up to Loake's premium 1880 range. You'll get a full leather lining in addition to the leather insole of the brogue you're looking at. And the leather of the upper will be noticeably better. Assuming they fit as well as your India-made brogue, they'll be more comfortable and last longer.

http://www.loake.co.uk/byrange/loake-1880/buckingham.html

300 USD might seem like a lot for a pair of shoes, but dark brown calf wingtips are extremely versatile: you'll wear them a lot.
post #9 of 24
The most versatile shoe style, bar none, is the chukka boot. Nothing else will work with everything from a suit to jeans.

For a second shoe, you need dark brown. Stay away from things like "chestnut". They are great if you have lots of money to spend and know what you are doing. But they are too finicky and don't belong in a basic wardrobe.




In this example, the pebble grain takes it down a notch in formality, as does the storm welt. Having said that, depending on the suit and the event, they are perfectly fine and look great. With anything less than a suit, including a sport coat, they are perfect. A plain calf chukka, especially in black, is slightly more formal and can be worn with a suit in any situation.
post #10 of 24
^
I would agree with the chukka or it's older, wiser sibling: the good old plain toe blücher. Simple, elegant, and yet also robust. For colour, I think it's difficult to find clothes that do not go with burgundy.

post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by atia2 View Post

^
I would agree with the chukka or it's older, wiser sibling: the good old plain toe blücher. Simple, elegant, and yet also robust. For colour, I think it's difficult to find clothes that do not go with burgundy.

 

Seconded. Burgundy is just as, if not more, versatile than dark brown.

post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by atia2 View Post

^
I would agree with the chukka or it's older, wiser sibling: the good old plain toe blücher. Simple, elegant, and yet also robust.

Speaking for myself, I want to be younger and get into more trouble.

Quote:
Originally Posted by starro View Post

Seconded. Burgundy is just as, if not more, versatile than dark brown.

I have to disagree. There isn't necessarily anything wrong with burgundy, but it isn't as versatile as dark brown, especially if you travel.
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by starro View Post

Seconded. Burgundy is just as, if not more, versatile than dark brown.

I'll add a third. I'm a much bigger fan of burgundy than dark brown.
post #14 of 24
@Academic2 is quite right, it is very much dependent on many considerations

A darker brown will tend to be more versatile and don't rule out suede.

I'm also a fan of burgundy like my Lobb



or my EG Dover in 'nightshade'

post #15 of 24

^

Yes, hard to go wrong with that nightshade or an oxblood. Essentially you want something close to black, but not black. The problem I have with brown is that it tends to fall down with grey, which is a very common clothing colour.

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