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When we see someone wearing a waistcoat/vest... or in a three-piece suit, do you...

Poll Results: Do you automatically look if the last button is unbuttoned on a person wearing a waistcoat/vest?

 
  • 63% (7)
    Yes
  • 36% (4)
    No
11 Total Votes  
post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Automatically scan to see if the last button on their waistcoat is unbuttoned or not to make a quick judgment of the person's knowledge of wearing suits?

 

 

Because I do every time and I can't seem to stop.

I'm a horrible person.


Edited by Suntory - 12/7/15 at 8:00pm
post #2 of 11
Thread Starter 

Don't be shy folks.

post #3 of 11
Suit jackets, too. satisfied.gif
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hirschlederne View Post

Suit jackets, too. satisfied.gif

And tie/ps combo.

 

Heck,in celebration of faux pas kings:

 

post #5 of 11

It is not a rule that a person should never button the bottom of a waistcoat. It is simply a matter of how it is cut. Many waistcoats are cut for all the buttons to be buttoned.

 

On a related note, I do notice when someone has buttoned the bottom button on a tailored jacket. 

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tharr011 View Post
 

It is not a rule that a person should never button the bottom of a waistcoat. It is simply a matter of how it is cut. Many waistcoats are cut for all the buttons to be buttoned.

 

 

No matter how well-cut it is, the last button should never be buttoned, unless we lived at a time prior to Edward II.  Sure it might not be a rule, but there's no rule against wearing your trousers inside out either.

 

Edit: VII not II


Edited by Suntory - 12/9/15 at 12:44am
post #7 of 11
Nope. I don't care.
post #8 of 11

I'm assuming you are referring to Edward VII because Edward II was living during the 13th Century. 

 

Again, It is a common misconception that one must button the button bottom to be tasteful. It's not the same as a suit jacket.  

post #9 of 11
My experience is that the Italians tend to cut a vest 5 buttons to button all five. The Brits cut the vest 6 buttons to button 5. In that case, the last button is not in the right place to button.

For example,



I thought this post was informative.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OxxfordSJLINY View Post

A 6 X 5 button classic style single breasted vest has the same exact silhouette as a five-button classic style single breasted vest.


However, with a five-button classic style single breasted vest, all five buttons and button holes (including the bottom button and button hole) are functional, which means that it is a fashion faux pas to button the bottom button even though the bottom button is meant to be buttoned.


With a 6 X 5 button classic style single breasted vest, the bottom button and button hole and spaced out and positioned so that they are just for show so that the bottom button can never be buttoned (the bottom button, as a result, is meant to never be buttoned, FWIW). The top five button and button holes are all functional. As a result, all five functional buttons (including the fifth functional button) can be buttoned (here the fit, drapery, comfort and appearance is indescribably or almost indescribably better, FTW) without it being a fashion faux pas since only the bottom button (regardless of whether it is or is not meant to be buttoned) is the one that is supposed to remain unbuttoned.


You should have the vest made with a notch lapel. If you are smaller horizontally, the notch lapel on each side of the vest should be one inch wide in its narrowest area and two inches wide in its widest area (with the jacket lapel being three inches wide in its narrowest area and four inches wide in its widest area; I would go for a one-button or two-button peak lapel single breasted jacket that, of course, is low cut). This would be the most proportionate if you are smaller horizontally.


However, if you are larger horizontally, the notch lapel on each side of the vest should be two inches wide in it narrowest area and three inches wide in its widest area (with the jacket lapel being four inches wide in its narrowest area and five inches wide in its widest area; again, I would go for a one-button or two-button peak lapel single breasted jacket that, of course, is low cut). This would be the most proportionate if you are larger horizontally.


Oh, the vest should definitely be medium cut. Low cut vests are for formalwear while high cut vests are simply too much vest, even though low cut vests are not too little vest unless they are really, really low cut (where they are just as much too little vest as high cut vests are too much vest).


As for other details of the vest (most of which I don't have time to mention), just as long as you avoid the following: patch pockets, pocket counts other than zero, two or four (never have more pockets on one side of the vest than the other or a pocket or pockets on one side of the vest but not the other) and security pockets and make sure that you can have two fish mouth openings (one in the center of the left side of the vest and one in the center of the right side of the vest; both of these fish mouth openings on the center of the sides of the vest would be large upside down V shaped openings, FWIW) on the vest as these fish mouth openings on the vest make an indescribable or near indescribable difference in fit, drapery, comfort and appearance, FTW.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tharr011 View Post
 

I'm assuming you are referring to Edward VII because Edward II was living during the 13th Century. 

 

Again, It is a common misconception that one must button the button bottom to be tasteful. It's not the same as a suit jacket.  

Opps, just owned myself there.

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

My experience is that the Italians tend to cut a vest 5 buttons to button all five. The Brits cut the vest 6 buttons to button 5. In that case, the last button is not in the right place to button.

For example,

 

Not so. Steed makes all the buttons on their waistcoats functional, by default. I asked Edwin about this exact thing the first time he made me a waistcoat. Let's just say he reacted with distaste at the suggestion of a non-functional bottom button.

 

I did recently buy a RTW waistcoat from Cording's, and it only has five buttons total. Leaving the fifth button undone on this waistcoat would leave the last button somewhere around my navel. So, I bite the bullet when I wear it and button all the buttons. Total parvenu, I know.

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