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Books on etiquette - Page 2

post #16 of 21
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Huntsman, I sort of agree with you but the way people are today, perhaps a little kick in the can by people like the EG might be what's needed. It's not the way I'd teach etiquette and manners but perhaps it's reaching someone out there who needs guidance. It's getting ugly out there...anyone on my side is appreciated even if I have to tolerate a difference of opinion.
Sorry to be renitent, gorgekko, but though I understand your way of accepting this, I'm afraid I can't get around to it, though I've tried. Here's how I see it: These people are burlesquing etiquette; they mock it. Etiquette is an attitude of graciousness that uses socially accepted and understood forms and rituals to convey that grace, respect, and tolerance. These pundits are not only eliminating those underlying attitudes -- character, if you will -- they act as if they were never part of the process. Therefore, they are teaching mere affectation of etiquette, othwise known as how to be a snob. Again, my apologies for being blunt. I just feel that this is an insidious threat. In an age when humanity hangs on people in tatters, I am on defense against 'authorities' who can have real influence pulling on the remaining shreds. Regards, Huntsman
post #17 of 21
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I cannot tell you how much a appreciate these comments.
Likewise, indeed. I was half expecting to be verbally eviscerated for them... Regards, Huntsman
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Sorry to be renitent, gorgekko, but though I understand your way of accepting this, I'm afraid I can't get around to it, though I've tried. Here's how I see it: These people are burlesquing etiquette; they mock it. Etiquette is an attitude of graciousness that uses socially accepted and understood forms and rituals to convey that grace, respect, and tolerance. These pundits are not only eliminating those underlying attitudes -- character, if you will -- they act as if they were never part of the process. Therefore, they are teaching mere affectation of etiquette, othwise known as how to be a snob. Again, my apologies for being blunt. I just feel that this is an insidious threat. In an age when humanity hangs on people in tatters, I am on defense against 'authorities' who can have real influence pulling on the remaining shreds.
As much as I'd want to debate with you, I have to admit -- grudgingly -- that you are right. I guess I'm just trying to look at the EGs from the kindest possible angle and overlooking their faults.
post #19 of 21
Although it is not an etiquette book, per se, "Putting Your Best Foot Forward" by Jo-Ellen Dimitrius and Mark Mazaralla is one of the best books I've read on making a positive social impression (and recovering from social gaffes). I would recommend this book to anyone seeking to improve his or her social image and interpersonal communication skills.
post #20 of 21
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I guess I'm just trying to look at the EGs from the kindest possible angle and overlooking their faults.
As a gentleman would. With my regards, Huntsman
post #21 of 21
Anyone visiting the UK, doing business with British companies, or even just visiting as a tourist will find Debrett's New Guide to Etiquette and Modern Manners a useful volume. As many will know, some conventions differ between the UK and US, and a little research will pay dividends. Debrett's
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