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Best dress shoes - Page 2

post #16 of 32
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(ernest @ 06 Oct. 2004, 7:49)
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Originally Posted by Giona Granata,06 Oct. 2004, 09:21
And what about Church's?
It seems they have many new models which looks not to bad,  at least better than what they made these 3 last years. The upscale range, "masterclass" looks nice.
Right, but at around $500 including tax (and some models breaking 500 euro) the shoes simply are grossly overpriced. I haven't looked at the new ones up close enough to see if they're corrected grain, but stitched aloft, with clunky lasts, the shoes really don't deliver for that price. Go for Tricker's (lasts might be similarly clunky but very, very well made) or Crockett and Jones. Alfred Sargent Premier Exclusives deliver a much better shoe at a much lower price. That said, "Tootsie Plohound" is a dumbass name for a retailer (cf AAAC). I think Green makes a fantastic RTW shoe; I've had nothing but phenomenal service from the Green personnel and the Green corner at Old England. To the RTW shoe best of list I suppose we should add Silvano Lattanzi/Borrelli (made by Lattanzi?) as well as Kiton. Fantastic shoes but only when judged when price is no object. $2000 for ready-to-wear shoes is certifiably insane. The Lobb bootmaker soles are nice, but $1200 for them? I've got some Green special orders down the pike and have specified (very) bevelled waists for them: they're quite accomodating for much less. Watch this space. In terms of shoe value for money, I suppose Trickers and Alfred Sargent Premier stand out. I've seen a French brand called Loding at ludicrously low prices for quality shoes (channelled soles, antiqued leather, decent construction for 150 euros). I'm curious if anyone else knows it. And of course, Vass ready-to-wear, which is constructed in the same way as Vass bespoke, is another contender for best RTW shoe. Fantastically well made, although it appears that there is no bevelling except on the chisel-toed U last (A Harris, correct me). Also no antiquing -- I suppose avoiding the ersatz-antiquing charges levelled against Berluti, Aubercy and Corthay.
Aubercy is nice and not so expensive Are your in France? Do you know Albaladejo?
post #17 of 32
How do people feel about Mantellassi and Artioli?
post #18 of 32
Mantellassi makes a very nice Norwegian, priced between Borgioli and Lattanzi. Artioli are way overpriced here in the States by the guys that carry them. Same with Barrett. IMO.
post #19 of 32
I would also add Harris, Lidfort and Stefano Bi to whatever list for great RTW shoes is being compiled. koji
post #20 of 32
No mention of Santoni so far?
post #21 of 32
Nope...I don't think J.M. Weston has been mentioned either (WONDERFUL loafers). koji
post #22 of 32
Tanino Crisci?
post #23 of 32
Koji: If my memory serves me correctly, I would say Berluti makes a better shoe than Stefanobi, or at least that Stefanobi makes a better shoe for Berluti than they do for their own-label line. ernest: While I journey often to France for my Tetsujin to do battle in the culinary arena with such luminaries as Pierre Gagnaire and Joel Robuchon, I prefer the seclusion of my epicurean castle. I have never visited Albaladejo but from what I have seen and read they seem like good shoes. Aubercy makes beautiful shoes, a tad cheaper than Berluti but apparently not much different in quality. I personally think it is ludicrous that Barneys NY is selling Berluti -- for about twice what the European prices are, with Barneys' horrific customer service. The best thing about Berluti was the service they gave me. If Stefanobi is on the list, how about Stefano Branchini or Enzo Bonafe, or Bonora?
post #24 of 32
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post #25 of 32
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Koji: If my memory serves me correctly, I would say Berluti makes a better shoe than Stefanobi, or at least that Stefanobi makes a better shoe for Berluti than they do for their own-label line. ernest: While I journey often to France for my Tetsujin to do battle in the culinary arena with such luminaries as Pierre Gagnaire and Joel Robuchon, I prefer the seclusion of my epicurean castle. I have never visited Albaladejo but from what I have seen and read they seem like good shoes. Aubercy makes beautiful shoes, a tad cheaper than Berluti but apparently not much different in quality. I personally think it is ludicrous that Barneys NY is selling Berluti -- for about twice what the European prices are, with Barneys' horrific customer service. The best thing about Berluti was the service they gave me. If Stefanobi is on the list, how about Stefano Branchini or Enzo Bonafe, or Bonora?
I saw some gorgeous whole-cut Stefano bi's that were made for Domenico Vacca, really beautiful shoes. Branchini's i've never been fond of styling-wise, and I've never seen Bonora's (unfortunately, they're marvelous shoes) in the US. koji
post #26 of 32
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(Kaga @ 07 Oct. 2004, 08:41) I personally think it is ludicrous that Barneys NY is selling Berluti -- for about twice what the European prices are, with Barneys' horrific customer service.
I was just in Barney's two weeks ago, and I did not see any Berluti shoes.  Are they in the main shoe department on the first floor?
Neither have I; they did have a very nice selection of C&J, Lidfort and Harris, though. koji
post #27 of 32
I was quite fascinated by the incomparable Mr. Pollock's (Wish I could be more like him&#33 assigning of relative values to high-grade shoes earlier in this thread. However, I think he raises the bar a bit high for Allen-Edmonds, which he uses as the benchmark for his ratings. Even if we leave out the seconds and closeouts available at the outlet stores, Nordstroms usually sells several of the $285-list A-Es at $189 during their sales(these are presumably firsts), and I am sure similar bargains are available from other sources. I don't mean to come across as a shill for Allen-Edmonds, but when it comes to the relationship of quality to price, they are very, very hard to beat. Of course, if you are one of those fortunate individuals for whom a $500 or $600 price differential is a mere bagatelle, then this is of no consequence. However, for those of us working stiffs who have to cultivate elegance with economy (to paraphrase Pericles), I don't know of an attractive alternative to Allen-Edmonds.
post #28 of 32
I have to concur with JLibourel. I found this discussion regarding Allen Edmonds so intriguing I had to join the forum to question some of the comments regarding AE. Except for one pair of Aldens, I own about 15 pairs of AEs and I did buy three pair of Grensons recently (Thanks). I ordered a pair of Aldens out of curiosity and because AE did not make a shoe with a medallioned toe in a balmoral style. The Aldens I own are a special order style 909 black shell cordovan - now maybe it's becasue I only own one pair of Aldens, but I'm curious, why is anyone of the opinion that Aldens are superior to AE? I don't see it OR feel it? In fact, I think the finish on the interior of the shoe of my Aldens is a bit sloppy - they used a little bit of black calfskin at the top of the back of the shoe to hold the back seam instead of cordovan. I seen no real differnece and actually find the AEs more comfortable against my heel and prefer the clean leather insole without the paste in heel patch. Is this assertion of superiority based on the fact that Aldens cost more? That's what I suspect - but I'd like someone to offer a different justification - perhaps I'm missing something? And as for cost evidencing quality - we know there's no direct correlation, and I would suggest Aldens cost more becasue they're made in New England with higher fixed costs and labor costs, while AEs are made in the comparatlively cheaper midwest. Based on what I've seen, I view Aldens and AEs as equivalent (though, Alden, I think, offers a better/wider selection of balmoral style lace-ups, whici I prefer). Would soeone please explain why Alden seems to be deemed superior?
post #29 of 32
Silvano Lattanzi, and Bonora?
post #30 of 32
Well,for one thing,my local cobbler pointed out that Aldens have a steel shank verses the wood shank that AE uses.Therefore, it's safe to say the things you don't see within a given product make a difference. Also,I understand that AE's are mostly machine made,(albeit with sophisticated machinery)whereas Aldens have more handwork.I don't think this would necessarily translate to a better feeling shoe,but,in general,the more handwork,the better the shoe,or suit,shirt,etc.
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