or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › The Official Cars Discount / Thrift & DIY Questions and Bragging Thread.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Cars Discount / Thrift & DIY Questions and Bragging Thread. - Page 28

post #406 of 546
Thread Starter 
True, a well balanced FR car on snow tires handles winter well. Done it for 3 winters. Aside from wheelspin on green lights. Both cars were fine.
post #407 of 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cj52racers View Post

Honestly, a Miata on steelies and Blizzaks are actually half way decent in the winter too due to their balance. As long as you have clearance in snow, they work just fine.

I've heard that a RWD/FWD drive car on actual snow tires can perform as well or better than a 4WD car on all season tires. I've never tested it and I imagine it would vary depending on the vehicle. If we move somewhere with actual winters I was concerned about my RWD Tahoe but figured I could always buy a dedicated set of snow tires.
post #408 of 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post


I've heard that a RWD/FWD drive car on actual snow tires can perform as well or better than a 4WD car on all season tires. I've never tested it and I imagine it would vary depending on the vehicle. If we move somewhere with actual winters I was concerned about my RWD Tahoe but figured I could always buy a dedicated set of snow tires.

 

Point is moot. I have dedicated snow tires for my Subie on a different set of steelies.

 

The bigger issue with a car like a miata/350z is clearance in the winter.


Edited by ridethecliche - 6/30/16 at 2:45pm
post #409 of 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

I've heard that a RWD/FWD drive car on actual snow tires can perform as well or better than a 4WD car on all season tires. I've never tested it and I imagine it would vary depending on the vehicle. If we move somewhere with actual winters I was concerned about my RWD Tahoe but figured I could always buy a dedicated set of snow tires.
At speed, yes. The place where 4wd does better is under acceleration, on uneven ground, and in thick snow where you have to "power" through. On plowed semi flat roads, the differences are less pronounced as long as inputs in throttle/brakes/steering are smooth.

All seasons are mostly shit honestly. Not enough people use proper winter tires. People think of them as snow tires, but winter tires really aren't for snow specifically (there are separate snow tires -studded, etc). The real advantage to winter tires is that the rubber compounds are made to be operable at a winter temperature range and perform mich better than summer or all seasons even on a dry ground because they are softer and grip better in lower temps.
post #410 of 546
Thread Starter 
To agree with CJ, and to add some. Winter or "studless" tires dramatically transform how a car performs in winter. Worth every dollar.

It all comes down to knowing your car, and learning how it behaves in winter.

RTC, that is nonsense. I have seen "Slammed" LS400's plowing through a foot of snow. And my Altezza was on the lowest setting for the coilovers.
Your subie is not an SUV. Losing an inch or 2 of clearance won't make a difference. The worst that can happen is you scrape your front bumper. But if your car is slammed, it's gonna scrape anyway. nod[1].gif

Furthermore, to actually go into bat for the Miata's? Not many cars would have the same predictability, or recoverability when they start to dance. Just feather the accelerator. Until you got it straight. And if you needed any parts like a hardtop? You know where to get it.

- one drove past me today that would make your eyes water. Sounded nice too. An NA, navy blue, on Volks. 100%racecar.
post #411 of 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrift Vader View Post

True, a well balanced FR car on snow tires handles winter well. Done it for 3 winters. Aside from wheelspin on green lights. Both cars were fine.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post


I've heard that a RWD/FWD drive car on actual snow tires can perform as well or better than a 4WD car on all season tires. I've never tested it and I imagine it would vary depending on the vehicle. If we move somewhere with actual winters I was concerned about my RWD Tahoe but figured I could always buy a dedicated set of snow tires.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
 

 

Point is moot. I have dedicated snow tires for my Subie on a different set of steelies.

 

The bigger issue with a car like a miata/350z is clearance in the winter.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cj52racers View Post


At speed, yes. The place where 4wd does better is under acceleration, on uneven ground, and in thick snow where you have to "power" through. On plowed semi flat roads, the differences are less pronounced as long as inputs in throttle/brakes/steering are smooth.

All seasons are mostly shit honestly. Not enough people use proper winter tires. People think of them as snow tires, but winter tires really aren't for snow specifically (there are separate snow tires -studded, etc). The real advantage to winter tires is that the rubber compounds are made to be operable at a winter temperature range and perform mich better than summer or all seasons even on a dry ground because they are softer and grip better in lower temps.

 

 

Several years ago, I had a Mercedes Diesel (RWD obviously) and it had summer performance tires.  I knew they would suck in the winter so I bought all season tires thinking that would be good enough.  It wasn't.  If you anything about these diesels you know it wasn't exactly fast on acceleration. But, when we got ice or snow, it was totally useless.  I ended up buying some actual snow tires (only two) and it was a big improvement.  But, a few years later I bought a BMW 7 series with MUCH more power than the diesel and it also had performance summer tires.  I was lucky enough to find a set of real snow tires mounted on a second set of wheels.  WOW.  That was a huge difference.  Just going from 2 snow tires to 4 was a massive improvement.  AND having a dedicated set of wheels and tires meant it was so easy to switch over.  I stored the off season tires/wheels in my garage/shed and when it came time to switch back, it was no big deal.  My big ole rear wheel drive car with snow tires plowed through everything and the only time I ever had an issue (as others have mentioned) was if the snow was so deep it started to dam up over the front bumpers.  Fortunately that doesn't happen much in Kansas. 

post #412 of 546
Yeah, all seasons are a huge compromise and end up being not great in any season. Unless an odd tire/lug size, a cheap set of steelies and winter tires is a huge jump in predictablity, performance, and safety at a relatively low cost. Most people would be shocked at the difference it makes.
post #413 of 546

Another vote for all seasons being a poor compromise and winter tires being awesome. Buy 4, use them when it starts to get really cold out (standard guideline is when the temp drops below 7C [44F], then you'd be better off with dedicated winter tires). Keep the winter tires on some cheap wheels. Easy to swap a set in your driveway, rather than wait for a tire mounting joint who may scratch your nice street wheels, in addition to salt, etc messing with your nice wheels.

post #414 of 546

I just found out Thrift Vader paints cars. I knew there was something "off" about him. lol! Takes one to know one. :nodding:

 

Life is short, so I feel it's good to try out different things. I'll keep learning until I'm dead, that's for sure. ... and I learn best from my mistakes. Have I mentioned I learn a lot? lol!

My old 914-6 project, now owned by my brother. I welded on some rear flares from a 911SC, did a front slant nose body kit, and now it needed paint. So we did it ourselves. I sprayed on some sealer, we wet sanded it, then sprayed on several coats of colour.

 

 


Bolted back together, and back at my place, I started the long process of paint correction. This was the second car I've painted, and the orange peel was poor in places, and great in others. Time to wet sand to fix my mistakes! I took my time with 2000 grit. Better to go slow than too fast. Keep sanding until the high spots are knocked off. Careful of the edges where the paint is thin. 


 

...then lots of polishing. I started with one of those oscillating polishers, but found out quickly it would take years to get the job done. So out came the rotary with a wool pad and being careful. Once the rough polishing was done, out came the oscillating polisher and several stages of polish.  

The final result is better in the vast majority of places than any factory paint I've seen on my other cars. It just took a while. A long while. lol!


Now the car is being enjoyed in an environment where it thrives!

*

 

With me, one success can lead to trying out something else..... something a little more challenging.... always pushing .... always trying to improve things ....

So, while cleaning up my shop and now knowing what a nice paint finish can look like, and with some sandpaper in my hand .... I noticed some orange peel on my GT3 ...

You know where this is going. lol!
 

post #415 of 546
914-6's are undervalued by the market right now I think. Really awesome car man!
post #416 of 546
Thread Starter 
That looks great!

You thinking of doing a custom job on your track car?

Haha, i try not to paint often. Weeks of sanding for hours of painting. Will do another one soon enough.

And it's awesome to get more DIY action up in here nod[1].gif
post #417 of 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cj52racers View Post

914-6's are undervalued by the market right now I think. Really awesome car man!

 

Thanks. It isn't original, (1975 conversion), but it's a ton of fun! 911SC engine and trans, Koni adjustable shocks with appropriate suspension upgrades, 911S brakes up front, 914-6 in the rear, 225/50 rubber at all corners - with manual brakes and manual steering. A recipe for good fun!

I have the suspension dialed in fairly well and one of my best autocross days with this car was when I came within 1.5 seconds of a friend, (a really good driver), with his 997 GT3, on a 50 second course. I've done enough autocrosses in my 996 GT3 to know what these can do, so I'm really impressed with the 914-6. My brother's tires were old, heat-cycled out freebies from a friend of a friend too. He needs some good tires and this car will do very well.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrift Vader View Post

That looks great!

You thinking of doing a custom job on your track car?

Haha, i try not to paint often. Weeks of sanding for hours of painting. Will do another one soon enough.

And it's awesome to get more DIY action up in here nod[1].gif


Thanks. I think I sanded my fingers off.  :cheers:

Nothing crazy with the GT3, just cleaning up the hood. I'll dig up the pics. Not sure what the future holds though. I just need a little inspiration and some free time in the fall, after track season is over. 

post #418 of 546

After correcting the paint on the 914-6, the neglected GT3 was pleading for me to do something. So I started some polishing, and then my black car quickly turned speckled. wtf? Oh crap..... there were about 100 small rock chips that were all over the hood from all those track days. The white polish was filling up the holes, making the hood look like garbage. If there ever was a case for using one of those clear bras, a black track car is it. lol!

 

So the hood needs a repaint at some point. Fine. The pressure is off and I can play. :D

 

I talked to some friends who own one of the best detail shops in the PacNW and got some supplies and advice.

 

 

If you aren't familiar with the term "orange peel", it's used to describe the texture you can see on car paint. You can't have the paint too thin so it flows out perfectly, because it'll run. So it needs to be a bit thicker and the consequence is an uneven surface where the texture of the paint is like an orange peel. You can easily see this in your own car by looking at it with a light source at an angle. If it were perfectly flat, you'd see a clear reflection. As you see below, it isn't.

 

 

 

I wanted to make this better. So after masking the edges and covering what I didn't want to get messy, out came the 2000 grit paper, a bucket of water with a spray bottle, and a lot of bravery(!)

 

...and I started sanding the hood of my beautiful car.


 

I sanded until most of the high spots were gone. You don't want to remove too much clear coat, because it'll fail if you do. Go as far as you dare. 

 

 


To see where I was at, I masked off an area and gave it a quick polish. It's an improvement! But I wanted it better, so I sanded it some more.


I made it better. :slayer:

Want to see something cool? Check out the pic below. This is a reflection of the overhead light that is 6 feet above my car! This is in the best part of the hood, but it shows what you can do with a lot of elbow grease and an ounce of courage. lol!



Before & after pic of part of the hood. You can still see some remnants of orange peel on part of this, but it's so much better than before.



Now I need to do the rest of the car..... :embar:

post #419 of 546
Would you guys buy a saabaru?
post #420 of 546
Thread Starter 
No.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › The Official Cars Discount / Thrift & DIY Questions and Bragging Thread.