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Neckties: A Discussion Thread - Page 66

post #976 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post
 

 

I have already given over 90% of my life to machines, which tell me when to eat, sleep, and brush my teeth (they don't brush them for me -- yet), populate spreadsheets for me and send e-mails while I sleep, and facilitate no coins or printed money ever passing these hands. Unfortunately, the tax sheet, particularly the US one, is a laughable 100s of pages, the kind of thing that seems deliberately sadistically designed: "Column A65? You'll have to file Form B-42, unless you are an S99 entity, in which case you need to ask at Window B6 for the BLUE form, on which you should check Box 4 of every odd-numbered page, unless you are type O negative blood of it is a full moon, in which case you will need the BLACK form, unlocked only by beating level 99 of the negative world and pressing up, up, down, down, a, b, select start and drawing a pentagram on the floor with blood drawn from your pinky finger using Pricking Shard B-62, available at the DMV upon presentation of a Light Motor Vehicle License."

 

In my opinion all of this shit should be given to CPAs, the more the better, so they can collect their nasty fees and leave you with precious time in this short life to do anything other than trying to beat level 99 of the negative world, which is really hard on account of the jumping Koopa-Troopas.

 

David, one of the many hats I wear, in addition to Tyrolean hats with feathers in them and beer hats with curly straws, is copywriter and extreme text producer extraordinaire, churning out 100s and 100s of pages daily for man, woman, and beast, from stick-on eyelashes for teens to research reports for think tanks. Do not hesitate to contact me for all of your text-churning needs. In fact, I am in the midst of a nice little bout of tendonitis brought on by extreme computing. I didn't use my special ergonomic stenographer's keyboard for a week and I am suffering the consequences. But no, not advertising per se, I think that's rather a low bar. Writing two lines for a box of cereal is a cheap trick. 

 

When I read this I can't figure out when you would ever need to wear a tie? Videochats? (No, not the nude ones).

post #977 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post
 

 

Is that what they say at school now?

 

Not as much as you'd think.

post #978 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiplomaticTies View Post
 

 

When I read this I can't figure out when you would ever need to wear a tie? Videochats? (No, not the nude ones).

 

When going to dinner with hot babes, duh!

And when persuading people to do things for me.

Don't do video chat. All text, all the time.

post #979 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiplomaticTies View Post
 

 

When I read this I can't figure out when you would ever need to wear a tie? Videochats? (No, not the nude ones).

 

I'm not only the president, I'm a member.

(reference for the Swedish man: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuRLGdGnqSU

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 

 

Not as much as you'd think.

 

A wave of calm and contentment ripples over the waves and all is well with the world.

post #980 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post
 

 

Don't do video chat. All text, all the time.

 

Porn too?

post #981 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post
 

Reading DiplomaticTies' comment on 500 ties, I am inspired to throw caution to the wind and order some ties I was looking at.

Seeing TweedyProf's image of a handrolled printed silk tie, my brain is jogged to ask a question:

 

What is the current preferred construction to order from the somewhat byzantine Cappelli site and achieve an optimal tie? I realize that "optimal" may vary here, but I refer to the discussion that has been frequently had in the EGC thread on varying quality of results in terms of thickness and folds being used in configurations that are not ideal, and of the stock ties having a way too thick interlining.

 

I'm looking at printed silks. Obviously the easiest way to avoid unintended thickness is get the "unlined" (= light lining and hand rolled edge) option, but I've always felt that hand rolled edges are a bit out of place on a dressier foulard tie, which is the ones I was looking at. Anyone care to weigh in? I assume you are all one-time or current Cappelli customers. I'm thinking something in the way of Vanda construction or slightly heavier. My past Cappelli ties are all over the place construction/wearability wise, some good, some great, some weird.

 

You've already received some good suggestions and if you can communicate directly with Mr Cappelli that would be best of course. My two cents if you want a dressier foulard is:

 

 

5-fold

Self-tipped

8,5 cm

Light lining

 

Light lining because Cappelli can sometimes go a little heavy on the lining. But since it's self-tipped and 5-fold it will still be dressy.

post #982 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiplomaticTies View Post
 

 

Porn too?

 

 

http://archive.oreilly.com/pub/h/4441

post #983 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post
 

 

 

http://archive.oreilly.com/pub/h/4441

 

Wow! I love that its technical but at the same time extremely arcane. Like buying a jet plane but only driving it on country roads.

post #984 of 1082

Technical and arcane go hand in hand. I like your analogy though. More such unreasonable combinations should be pursued.

 

The ASCII rendering is quite good, try it if you've tired of regular porn! Kind of has that vibe of flicking through pay-per-view channels on analog television and getting those wavy psychedelic lines and the occasional boob, although much more hi fidelity.

post #985 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiplomaticTies View Post

Thanks for the kind words!

I guess that it could vary from different places but I would dare to say that Drake's has in general had a strong influence in Sweden, where I'm from, and inspired especially younger people to wear ties. Menswear trends in Sweden have also been influenced quite a lot by some Asian brands and style icons, and Drake's seem to have a strong foothold in Japan, Korea and Hong Kong for instance. But you know much better than I do to what extent Drake's has actually influenced the business.

As for fabrics and construction I am very much an amateur and know little of the inner workings of a tie, even if I happen to know a few tiemakers. But my experience is solely from a user's perspective. Charvet is an interesting case since I agree with your comment that their construction can sometimes be surprisingly sloppy for such a famous brand. But they have one redeeming feature that I find unique: all their ties (especially the woven silks) make beautiful knots and they do it from day one. If you ask the people at Charvet how this is they claim that they have special fabrics made for just them. I don't know if that is true, but I have yet to find a Charvet that didn't make a beautiful knot.

My appreciation for Kiton has a lot to do with consistency. So far I haven't found any ties from Kiton that were not perfectly made. The same goes for Marinella. In other cases quality may vary. Cappelli is an example of this. Usually very good, but sometimes not.

Your comment that all the Italian name brands are about equal in construction, its all about time and energy, is interesting. I guess that some brands just have a stronger quality control then and are only prepared to accept a perfect product? But in my experience you can still find some regional and even house variations. You have some makers that like to experiment, like Tie Your Tie (even if I think that TYT:s 7-fold, handrolled and completely unlined ties are just a mess), Dolcepunta and Finamore. 

I am ashamed to admit though that my collection does not include any Hobers... What would be a signature Hober tie?

Diplomatic Ties,

There are always regional trends around the world so I interested to hear that Drakes has been an influence in Sweden - thank you for letting me know. I know that without reading SF I would perhaps not know who Drakes are as they are not well known in America. But I do know that they have some great classic designs.

Beautiful knots is a personal thought and I respect your point of view.

"...they have special fabrics made for just them."

Making special fabrics is very normal and is a big part of the famous brands claim to fame - so I am sure it is true. As for the fabric making the knot it is like a recipe the silk and interlining are mixed with construction so not just the fabric.

"My appreciation for Kiton has a lot to do with consistency. So far I haven't found any ties from Kiton that were not perfectly made. The same goes for Marinella. In other cases quality may vary. Cappelli is an example of this. Usually very good, but sometimes not."

You are so correct that quality control is very important. I really don't know what causes Cappelli to have mixed results. If I ever met him I would suggest getting rid of any outside tie makers and staying with his in house staff. But with two small children and two large dogs and a growing business I don't see myself traveling soon.

"What would be a signature Hober tie?"

I believe in trusting your first thoughts and then confirming with swatches.

I was told a story by a diplomat yesterday that you might enjoy:

He was at a party for a Thai ambassador in Europe and as he shook his hands the ambassador smiled when looking at his tie - it was a Thai mudmee silk that we had made for him last year which included the blue of the queen of Thailand.

Mudmee silk is made by hand dyeing silk before weaving in a complex process then the silk is hand woven.
post #986 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hober View Post


Diplomatic Ties,

There are always regional trends around the world so I interested to hear that Drakes has been an influence in Sweden - thank you for letting me know. I know that without reading SF I would perhaps not know who Drakes are as they are not well known in America. But I do know that they have some great classic designs.

Beautiful knots is a personal thought and I respect your point of view.

"...they have special fabrics made for just them."

Making special fabrics is very normal and is a big part of the famous brands claim to fame - so I am sure it is true. As for the fabric making the knot it is like a recipe the silk and interlining are mixed with construction so not just the fabric.

"My appreciation for Kiton has a lot to do with consistency. So far I haven't found any ties from Kiton that were not perfectly made. The same goes for Marinella. In other cases quality may vary. Cappelli is an example of this. Usually very good, but sometimes not."

You are so correct that quality control is very important. I really don't know what causes Cappelli to have mixed results. If I ever met him I would suggest getting rid of any outside tie makers and staying with his in house staff. But with two small children and two large dogs and a growing business I don't see myself traveling soon.

"What would be a signature Hober tie?"

I believe in trusting your first thoughts and then confirming with swatches.

I was told a story by a diplomat yesterday that you might enjoy:

He was at a party for a Thai ambassador in Europe and as he shook his hands the ambassador smiled when looking at his tie - it was a Thai mudmee silk that we had made for him last year which included the blue of the queen of Thailand.

Mudmee silk is made by hand dyeing silk before weaving in a complex process then the silk is hand woven.

 

Interesting, I was actually just looking at your Mudmee ties on your website. I was based in Singapore some years ago and visited Thailand on a fairly regular basis. I'm just wondering if the sheen of the Mudmee comes over too strongly in a tie. Swatches is probably the answer then.

post #987 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiplomaticTies View Post

Interesting, I was actually just looking at your Mudmee ties on your website. I was based in Singapore some years ago and visited Thailand on a fairly regular basis. I'm just wondering if the sheen of the Mudmee comes over too strongly in a tie. Swatches is probably the answer then.

Thai shot silk is often very bright but mudmee is not so bright sometimes very dark.

Swatches is always a good idea.
post #988 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post
 

I live by a 20 tie rule for cold seasons and warm seasons. Mostly just to challenge myself (I'm actually at 24 or so for F/W). Many people think I have too many ties! 

 

 

 

If I had to mention a pet peeve: on the pattern at the tip, I would expect perfect symmetry where the fold is at the pattern. Some makers pay no attention to this, and I hope deliberately (e.g. Drake's where the blade is folded wherever the pattern happens to be).

 

Some do, which I like, because it means that there was an extra step in the process where the sewer folded the tip to match the pattern on both sides. The effect above is subtle, but then, I might have paid $300 for it and demanded "perfection" (photo from Neiman Marcus).

 

Cf. this bespoke Cappelli on the right. The Kiton is just slightly off. Hard to do, I know, but that's part of what we appreciate in a well-crafted tie. Of course, other parts of the tie matter, and even more so. This is just one things that I look for when examining a tie.

 

 

Funny you should mention this.  I'm hardly OCD (one look at my desk or the inside of my vehicle would confirm this) but the symmetry described above is important enough to me to pass on an otherwise great tie if it doesn't have it.  Whether by chance or not, every Hober tie I've received with a pattern is perfectly symmetrical along the long axis, i.e. the bottom most dot or "flower" or whatever is centered directly above the tip of the front blade, just like the #1 bowling pin.  Further, not only is it centered, no portion of it disappears below the point.  It is a little thing but I appreciate it.  As noted, someone took a little extra time to line it up.

post #989 of 1082

^ definitely not by chance, knowing David from his comments alone in this thread. Yeah, it's a little thing to appreciate. I didn't ask for it in the tie, but someone care enough to do it.

post #990 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post
 

^ definitely not by chance, knowing David from his comments alone in this thread. Yeah, it's a little thing to appreciate. I didn't ask for it in the tie, but someone care enough to do it.

 

For me the broader point is that if there's sloppiness in what you can see there might be something even worse in what you can’t—it raises doubts, in short.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

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