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Neckties: A Discussion Thread - Page 68

post #1006 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hober View Post

As my literary friend Sprout2 mentioned

 

See, I told you guys I only read the porno mags for the articles!

post #1007 of 1082

Epilogue: the Barba tie is truly excellent and exceeded my (rather meager) expectations.

post #1008 of 1082

Pattern finishing. Madder from Cappelli

 


Of course, you can like it asymmetrically finished (as Drake's does more often than not), but one can appreciate that someone had to make an effort to pull carefully the medallions along the edge as above.

post #1009 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hober View Post

Tweedy Prof,

"...but I have developed a good rapport..."

It takes some energy to communicate across long distances in a second language - so you have created your good experience with Patrizio's ties. Congratulations.

I understand your feelings about fabrics. This morning I was looking at some 10 year old swatches that were beautifully woven but had satin stripes on reppe silk - too bright for most of our customers. I still loved the fabrics - and may adjust the colors and have the designs woven.

As my literary friend Sprout2 mentioned you can find some beautiful weaves in Italy. But what is even more magical about Italy is the way they expertly finish their fabrics.

Hi David,
Your input to this thread is really something I enjoy and learn a lot from.
Just curious, since you'd mentioned finishing.
What are the steps involved in the finishing process, and what makes a particular fabric desirable to you (in terms of finishing), as a tie maker?
post #1010 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThunderMarch View Post

Hi David,
Your input to this thread is really something I enjoy and learn a lot from.
Just curious, since you'd mentioned finishing.
What are the steps involved in the finishing process, and what makes a particular fabric desirable to you (in terms of finishing), as a tie maker?

ThunderMarch,

Thank you for your kind words.

Finishing is an art and the Italian fabric makers perform magic.

As an example heat and pressure and humidity and chemicals can all play a part in fabric finishing.

Think of fabric finishing as a recipe using the above ingredients and more.

For our ties a large percent of the time I ask for a soft finish which might involve a simple application of heat and pressure after weaving. We also use a dry crisp finish for some silks.

I remember around 12 years ago a customer ordered a beautiful handwoven and hand dyed Thai silk tie from us (we did the weaving and dyeing etc ourselves) and he wasn't happy with the texture which included slubs. For quite a while after that we wove our Thai silk to have a smoother finish which required quite a few changes in how we made the silk. Interestingly now it seems like there is more of an interest in silk with slubs and a rough texture.

We planted several hundred mulberry trees on our farm recently with a goal of producing a new style of Thai silk which will have a finish that is both rough and has slubs but also is smooth and that will drape well. So in this case the finish of the silk starts with the type of mulberry tree that we will use. We are using a variety from Phetchabun province instead of local Chiang Mai trees as the leaves are different.

Next, we will pick silkworm eggs that match what I have in mind for the finished silk. Then we feed the mulberry leaves to the silk worms. Who make silk cocoons. With many more steps some of which will be experiments. As you can see the final silk finish can be complex.

We can work with any type of finishing so to answer your question we balance what I like - with what our customers like. I have found that for our customers texture is very important as they already tend to have the basics covered.

I also find very desirable - fabric made by weavers and dyers that use modern equipment that allows for reusing and recycling dyes.
post #1011 of 1082
awsm, right there ^, awsm nod[1].gif
post #1012 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hober View Post

ThunderMarch,

Thank you for your kind words.

Finishing is an art and the Italian fabric makers perform magic.

As an example heat and pressure and humidity and chemicals can all play a part in fabric finishing.

Think of fabric finishing as a recipe using the above ingredients and more.

For our ties a large percent of the time I ask for a soft finish which might involve a simple application of heat and pressure after weaving. We also use a dry crisp finish for some silks.

I remember around 12 years ago a customer ordered a beautiful handwoven and hand dyed Thai silk tie from us (we did the weaving and dyeing etc ourselves) and he wasn't happy with the texture which included slubs. For quite a while after that we wove our Thai silk to have a smoother finish which required quite a few changes in how we made the silk. Interestingly now it seems like there is more of an interest in silk with slubs and a rough texture.

We planted several hundred mulberry trees on our farm recently with a goal of producing a new style of Thai silk which will have a finish that is both rough and has slubs but also is smooth and that will drape well. So in this case the finish of the silk starts with the type of mulberry tree that we will use. We are using a variety from Phetchabun province instead of local Chiang Mai trees as the leaves are different.

Next, we will pick silkworm eggs that match what I have in mind for the finished silk. Then we feed the mulberry leaves to the silk worms. Who make silk cocoons. With many more steps some of which will be experiments. As you can see the final silk finish can be complex.

We can work with any type of finishing so to answer your question we balance what I like - with what our customers like. I have found that for our customers texture is very important as they already tend to have the basics covered.

I also find very desirable - fabric made by weavers and dyers that use modern equipment that allows for reusing and recycling dyes.

Thanks for taking the time to answer in such detail David.
I had no idea so much was involved in making silk exactly the way you want it.
Just fascinating. Fascinating.
post #1013 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThunderMarch View Post


Thanks for taking the time to answer in such detail David.
I had no idea so much was involved in making silk exactly the way you want it.
Just fascinating. Fascinating.

Agreed, thank you David!

post #1014 of 1082

@TweedyProf some ties here I think you would like

http://jeeves.store/ties/

post #1015 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThunderMarch View Post

Thanks for taking the time to answer in such detail David.
I had no idea so much was involved in making silk exactly the way you want it.
Just fascinating. Fascinating.


Markboots and ThunderMarch,

It is my pleasure to answer questions - my comments are actually brief summaries - when time allows I plan to make much more detailed comments.
post #1016 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post
 

@TweedyProf some ties here I think you would like

http://jeeves.store/ties/


Thanks @sprout2 Interesting stuff. I like the regimentals, one of which is similar to a Drake's from last season (navy/beige). That said...

 

I'm actually a bit gun shy about new makers. At this point, it's Cappelli and Drake's for me as my first options, the first for construction/fabrics and the second, when they have a distinctive fabric that I can nab at a reasonable price. Vanda is my other option, and I intend to get a Hober tie in the near future. I'm just looking for fabrics that will fill the ever smaller gaps in my tie collection (which is near 50 ties, split across cold (25) and warm seasons (20 or so)). I can't see needing more so it's one-in-one-out these days (still, I'm thinking of increasing my limit to 25 or 30 ties...slippery slope anyone?). Right now, I'm on the hunt for some madders with medallions. I'll post some ideas later.

 

Other makers that I have and like

 

1. Exquisite Trimmings some of whose house ties come from the same maker as Viola Milano but at a fraction of the price

2. Borrelli (I had two, sold them tho), very nice.

 

With David and Patrizio's bespoke options priced at 80-100 dollars, though, it's hard to see why one might go elsewhere, save for distinctive fabrics...

 

For those who don't know about the 10/5 thread, that was part of my goal: what if you had to distill your tie collection down to 10 ties for a season, what would the 10 be? Check it out. The F/W thread is open to all to contribute (see OP).

 

@Sam Hober David, I'll add my thanks for your lifting the content in this thread.

post #1017 of 1082
I'm looking for a fine weave grenadine in the 75$ range similar to

http://www.exquisitetrimmings.com/products/Accessories/Ties/Grenadine-Ties-HandRolled-Fine-Weave.html

or

https://www.violamilano.com/product/burgundy-garza-fina

Massdrop currently has a knottery grenadine in a larger weave for 60$ but looking for something a bit tighter for my first grenadine.

Thanks!
post #1018 of 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBlackDonDraper View Post

I'm looking for a fine weave grenadine in the 75$ range [...]

 

Sam Hober offers finas for 85 USD:

 

https://www.samhober.com/grenadine-fina-solid-ties/

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #1019 of 1082

I own probably around 50-100 ties, ranging from Turnbull & Asser and other Jermyn Street makers to obscure Italian vintages and French names like Feraud and Lanvin (no Charvet - not a fan of their patterns). 

 

I bought a Hober for my wedding and it is my favourite of the lot. I couldn't find the houndstooth I wanted so I commissioned the thing, and both the tie and the service were exceptional. It's the little things like getting a dimple the way you want it almost every time, or just the weight and crunch of the thing under your fingers, the way the silk catches the light.

 

The only reason I haven't bought any more is that I now only wear ties a few times a year (at this point, only to weddings, conferences and funerals), so I haven't bought any more ties period. I have a wishlist ready to go straight to David the day this frequency increases again. He has virtually everything I want next in stock. He has my loyalty off just one order...

 

So, one more data point, one more enabler towards the Hober path.

post #1020 of 1082

My experience with grendadine fina:

 

Having ordered bespoke from 2 makers (Cappelli and Hober - and both are great), my recommendation to others is to order 1 inch shorter than you usually order.  Both seem to stretch / wear longer, really even at the first tying of the tie, it is not like it happens over time.  Not sure on the dynamics of why, doesn't really matter to me.  Not a big deal, just one of those little learnings to pass on to others.

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