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Recommend wines for my future cellar

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
As I've mentioned before, in the future I plan on building a wine cellar into my home. In the meantime I'd like to try more wines that would age well with storage in preparation for the time when I can store cases. Please, suggest a wine for me to drink.
post #2 of 26
Hopefully you already have a considerable collection of age worthy wines...built-in cellars (planned and built well) are expensive. That said, wine tastes and recommendations are truly personal as palettes and preferences vary by person. As you know, the wines you enjoy today are likely different from those you appreciated 2 years ago. My recommendations are to build on the collection of wines you like/have and attend tastings (age worthy wines, of course) or start/join a club as this will allow you sample many different wines without breaking the bank.
post #3 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by contactme_11 View Post
As I've mentioned before, in the future I plan on building a wine cellar into my home. In the meantime I'd like to try more wines that would age well with storage in preparation for the time when I can store cases. Please, suggest a wine for me to drink.

Screaming Eagle
Harlan Estate
Siduri
AP Vin
Loring
Peay
Mondavi
Caymus
Pride Mountain
Turley
Sea Smoke
Any true vintage port
Any first growth Bourdeaux
Any Grand Cru Burgundy
Any top flight Borolo, Brunello, or Amarone

That should keep you busy.
post #4 of 26
If youre in Europe i can give you some sugestions, if annywere else But what is your timeframe, building, storrage etc. Reds, whites etc. Sparkling, ports, sherys etc. What are your thougts on spending ... But Id start of by testing a few, before bying them by the case. I like Rhone, Barollo, Bandol, Valpolichela, Amarone, Ripasso, Gigondas (now im getting to spesific)
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm in the United States. I'm not sure what you mean by timeframe. My situation is I drink wine, my girlfriend's family drinks wine often, my family drinks wine often, almost all our friends are wine drinkers. We also entertain a lot. So I would like to find wines that I can store in large quantities for consumption within a few years, but that will age well if not drank within that period. Basicly I'd like variety so reds, whites, whatever
post #6 of 26
I gave you a good list for your parameters. The top several are individual California wineries. Go to their websites and join their waiting list for an allocation. Your location does not matter, wine is distributed world wide.

Or you could just buy a case of Yellowtail Shiraz and call it a day
post #7 of 26
a wine cellar would be such a cool thing to have. I think you should start attending tastings rather than asking people here. People here tend to recommend the best of everything, but you may not even have the palate to differentiate and could spend a lot more money than you really need to. Are you merely looking for personal satisfaction or are you trying to impress people with the vintage as well? Since there really isn't a cap to what you can spend on a project like this, it's best to determine your own inflection point beyond which spending more money doesn't get you much.
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
a wine cellar would be such a cool thing to have. I think you should start attending tastings rather than asking people here. People here tend to recommend the best of everything, but you may not even have the palate to differentiate and could spend a lot more money than you really need to. Are you merely looking for personal satisfaction or are you trying to impress people with the vintage as well? Since there really isn't a cap to what you can spend on a project like this, it's best to determine your own inflection point beyond which spending more money doesn't get you much.

GQ, I agree that he needs to get out and taste for himself what he likes. I also agree palates need to be developed, just like your nose does, to appreciate and differentiate certain things.

However, as to the spending more than you need to...

If you want age worthy wine, there is a certain minimum investment you have to make as 99.9% of wines are simply not made to age. There is a reason certain wines cost more than your average wine in that your per acre yields are lower (to concentrate) and the vines required for age worthy wine are a whole different story from your usual table wine.
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
GQ, I agree that he needs to get out and taste for himself what he likes. I also agree palates need to be developed, just like your nose does, to appreciate and differentiate certain things.

However, as to the spending more than you need to...

If you want age worthy wine, there is a certain minimum investment you have to make as 99.9% of wines are simply not made to age. There is a reason certain wines cost more than your average wine in that your per acre yields are lower (to concentrate) and the vines required for age worthy wine are a whole different story from your usual table wine.

the longest i've ever kept a bottle was a 2002 pouilly-fuissy that i drank early this year. i'm not anything near an expert but i do enjoy a good bottle. what's your cut-off poitn for table wine? you use the term with a negative connotation. i never buy the cheap stuff, but neither do i buy the super-expensive bottles because i haven't tasted enough wines to appreciate the difference. pouilly-fuisse is a favorite of mine though. i've never had a bad glass of it and it's reasonably priced at 27 a bottle. i need to try more wines myself though. i'd be interested to see what sort of make-up some of you would suggest for this guy's collection, in terms of aging possibilities and price per bottle.
post #10 of 26
GQ, on no, nothing wrong with a good table wine. I enjoy them almost daily. It is just that by definition, this wine is not age worthy. It lacks the tannins and structure needed to improve with aging.

As for cut off price for an age worthy wine, well it depends on many, many things. Varietal and origin have much to do with it. You can get a greaty age worthy syrah from a California maker, like say Peay, for about $33 USD. Their recently released La Bruma 2005 should probably sit five years before drinking and should keep improving until about 15 years out. However, you are not going to get a good first growth Bourdeaux for less than $250 USD or so, going up to thousands on the futures market.

Gotta run.
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
Are there any champanges that are meant to age?
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by contactme_11 View Post
Are there any champanges that are meant to age?

Vintage Krug, and the more full-bodied top cuvees of Bollinger, Pol Roger, Moet (DP), et al. can take some age. There's a legendary Krug from the 1920s that is reportedly still magnificent. A once-per-century wine, but it shows what is possible.

Of course, a lot of it depends on what you like. The Brits are notorious for liking Champagne when it's old enough to look like ale, and the French think they're crazy for doing so.
post #13 of 26
One word: d'Yquem.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post
One word: d'Yquem.

Agreed. Expand that to any good Sauternes though.
post #15 of 26
Indeed -- I like Rieussec, and Giurard also. And Doisy-Daen in Barsac. The only one I've had and didn't enjoy was a d'Arche. And OP -- lay up some 2001!
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