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Engineered Garments FW 15 - Page 63

post #931 of 1015
Without giving too much away, prices are in line with this fall, some classics even a bit less expensive. Per usual, this comes down to the price of fabric.

I dont see EG price gouging in any sense of the term. more intricate pieces can get expensive, but a fan can find a piece for 200 or for 1200 if they're looking to spend it.

Seeing new stuff is always excellent but I'm still containing excitement for SS16.
post #932 of 1015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mortenmouton View Post

What bothers me is that the last few EG garments I've had, all have threads dangling outside. The finishing of the threading is poor workmanship. Sometimes the clothes are covered in other stray coloured sewing threads. The cinch belts of one pair of USN pants just had so many loose threads, I wasn't sure if I should cut them off or witness the trousers unravelling by the time I got to work.

 

That is not poor workmanship. That is run-off from chain stitching. It is intentional. I can understand not liking the look of it. That's totally understandable. However, it's probably meant to display the quality of the workmanship, not signal a lack of it. If it bothers you, just trim it off. Your trousers won't unravel.

post #933 of 1015
I see ... does that explain why random non chain-stitched threads should be exposed on brand new EG garments sprouting from the crotch area?!

If Canali and Barena can demonstrate good tailoring without showing the entrails of stitching, that is because they make clothes fastidiously by hand using exceptional fabrics and paying attention to the finish. I'm not convinced that leaving threads dangling from garments to demonstrate quality is any better class than leaving a Hugo Boss sleeve label on a suit to show off.

The hit and miss quality of threading finish, and the eccentric size predictions and the increasing array of polyamide plastic content in their clothing are really difficult to like. I must like them a lot because I still buy them a lot. Maybe now I will be more selective..
post #934 of 1015
I hope you can find what you're looking for in future garments Mortenmouton!
post #935 of 1015

yes, watch out for that sneaky polyamide plastic content!

post #936 of 1015
I think so.

Here's one I was so sorely tempted by (after all, every EG afficienado needs more than one Bedford):



Available in the mysterious "wood blend".

Wool blended with.....cashmere? Virgin wool? Tweed? Jacob's wool? Silk? Plastic crap?!

The sheer frustration of perfecting the interpretation of the classic casual work jacket, interpreted from authentic historical templates and patterns, reproduced painstakinly in near perfection .....in compromised modern fabrics.

Looks like I'll be sitting out another season....


This one I'm really liking: EG in 95% cashmere, 5% cotton AW15 reproduced in Fairisle. On sale too:

post #937 of 1015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mortenmouton View Post

I think so.

Here's one I was so sorely tempted by (after all, every EG afficienado needs more than one Bedford):
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


Available in the mysterious "wood blend".

Wool blended with.....cashmere? Virgin wool? Tweed? Jacob's wool? Silk? Plastic crap?!

The sheer frustration of perfecting the interpretation of the classic casual work jacket, interpreted from authentic historical templates and patterns, reproduced painstakinly in near perfection .....in compromised modern fabrics.

Looks like I'll be sitting out another season....
 

 

Which Bedford is that?

post #938 of 1015
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Still available for sale at an incredible price. 100% real wool shell. 100% cotton inner lining.
Phenomenal detail; neat double vented so that the backside doesn't look like it is growing a single vent from in between. True working 4 button cuffs for fine control of how much shirt cuff to show. Slanted single chest pocket for an assymetric contemporary look less square than most city types. Even the shawl collar stands up for a modern peaky blinders look.

Just look at the intricate collar stitching:

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The understated black buttons complement the linear detailing of the grey bedford cord.

Surprised that such a highly thought out version of their Bedford jacket didn't sell out. Many EG fanboys don't appreciate EG garments and prefer their slow slippery slide into polyamides?
post #939 of 1015

You should get in touch with Nepenthes and tell them which fabrics to use for their clothes.

post #940 of 1015
Loose threading is a bit like a 'Where's Wally'.

Find it in this ijmage from their SS16 painter pants. It's not a big deal....but it is really irritating for a label that prides itself in good engineering. A few years ago, I never ever saw this kind of shoddy finishing of threads on their garments. Now, even their dealer images show them plain and loud, reflecting the lack of detailed attention to the actual finish of the garment:

post #941 of 1015
I think a lot of people get thrown off by the term "engineered". EG isn't a performance apparel company that does extensive research on materials and fatigue life on their products. If that were so, wool and cashmere and many of those thinner and more delegate fabrics woul never even be considered usable. I think the engineering in this sense is more that they are taking features from different historical garments (via the extensive vintage expertise of Daiki) and combining them into garments that are quite unique in their own right that haven't been made before. Take the fatigue pants for instance. The mainline is much different than the workaday line, with itsbleft pocket zipper, tapered legs, and drawstrings (they still have those?), in the wide spectrum of fabrics that have no business in military pants.

Fit-wise, EG is all about the boxy fit. It isn't some sleek, fitted garment that accentuates the male form, but rather more of the shapeless, but interesting layering and more A shape silhouette, although the pants seem to be moving in the slimmer direction (unfortunately).
post #942 of 1015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sieglinde View Post

You should get in touch with Nepenthes and tell them which fabrics to use for their clothes.

I'm in Yurop. Nepenthes will tell me to get lost biggrin.gif

I've been buying EG for years, but I'm losing the will lately (and noticing that I've only started posting to whinge, which um, isn't very nice of me but I'm so grumpy about my favourite brand, or one of my favourite brand, going downhill.

Decades ago, a small independent shop in the UK called Reiss set up only one store, then 2 stores, and then 3 stores, all in London. Their clothes were incredible quality - around £50 a shirt back in 1990 (works out around EG prices today). Then they became better known, expanded across the whole of the UK, then international. Now, none of their clothes are made locally. The quality is standard shopping mall fare and their designs are all samey and Macdonalds fare. My record with them was one shirt lasting one week, before the threading at the gusset came undone beof

I'd hate EG to go this way. But they already have massive international representation so they aren't that 'cute little iconic niche clothier they were when Suzuki first started off building EG. At the moment, I'm having to pay close attention to what I buy from EG, instead of closing my eyes and knowing that I can be assured of the quality without inspecting, seeing and checking it out. For any lesser brand, that isn't unexpected.
post #943 of 1015

Not the biggest fan of the brand in its current form, especially with the overproduced lookbook shots and gaudy styling, but I will say that there is no real difference in quality between the present stuff and older stuff. I'm saying this as someone who owns mostly stuff from FW07-FW12 and has handled a ton of pieces from the more recent seasons.

 

I'm sure you can find an errant piece here and there, but exceptions that prove the rule, etc.

post #944 of 1015
Quote:
Originally Posted by timpoblete View Post

I think a lot of people get thrown off by the term "engineered". EG isn't a performance apparel company that does extensive research on materials and fatigue life on their products. If that were so, wool and cashmere and many of those thinner and more delegate fabrics woul never even be considered usable. I think the engineering in this sense is more that they are taking features from different historical garments (via the extensive vintage expertise of Daiki) and combining them into garments that are quite unique in their own right that haven't been made before. Take the fatigue pants for instance. The mainline is much different than the workaday line, with itsbleft pocket zipper, tapered legs, and drawstrings (they still have those?), in the wide spectrum of fabrics that have no business in military pants.

Fit-wise, EG is all about the boxy fit. It isn't some sleek, fitted garment that accentuates the male form, but rather more of the shapeless, but interesting layering and more A shape silhouette, although the pants seem to be moving in the slimmer direction (unfortunately).

Tim -

I always understood EG to be engineered in design (like the Bedford Clement jacket with its subtle detailing. Nigel Cabourn pays a lot more attention to the fabrics and historical designs as a joint philosophy: he uses Ventile (100% original water repellent cotton); Harris Tweeds, Fox Brothers flannels). Sandro Zara of Barena uses traditional Italian fabrics, including Bottoli wool, and others similiar to Loro Piana fabrics to construct unstructured jackets. They do use PA (polyamides up to around 20%) for the reasons you indicate: wearability and work fatigue. When PA content starts to hit 40%, it's a loose argument, paying $1000 for a garment made of 40% PA, over an identical garment made in Asia with 40% PA costing 1/10th by a fashion designer like Farah, Fred Perry or Massimo Osti's MA Strum collection (hugely marked up in price though!)

The fit of each designer is usually intentional; however I've never ever heard a designer willfully leave threads out. Comparing the 1920's cotton twill of EG's pants, I'm rather impressed by the material. The fit, perhaps is second to Orslow's well executed fatigue pants, however that may be person specific. Similarly Nigel Cabourns army pants are made of an interesting material for his Lybro collection (not made in England). The finish and threading of all 3 pants including EG is excellent. But I had to trawl through a shelf full of them, weeding out the pairs with threads sticking out.

Talking of fitted garments....the 'ankle crop' fashion is a really bizarre one where fashion designers are encouraging men to wear short pants that just fail to cover the ankles. It's like...wearing a provocative hijab just exposing a little more chin.
post #945 of 1015

I feel like you are misunderstanding Engineered Garments.  It's not performance clothing.  There is a place for that, but Engineered Garments is not it.  "Made in U.S.A." has certain connotations, but "perfection" is not one of those.  In fact, in terms of manufacturing technology, the US has long lagged behind, for example, China.  However, it's this that attracts Daiki.  I read this years ago, but it bears repeating:

 

Daiki Suzuki: "[American-made] clothes have a natural, post modernist & deconstructive quality about them. If a button falls off you sew another one on but it probably won't match and this makes it uniquely yours. When you find a garment that you love to wear it survives with you in its own way and becomes a second skin. It is these clothes which I want to make, clothes that you love wearing and become yours through the experience you have with them."

 

I you are looking for perfectly constructed garments, with every stitch in place, go get something from Ralph Lauren that is made in China to pretty impeccable standards (and there is nothing wrong with that.  I personally really like some of Ralph Lauren's lines), because that has never been what Engineered Garments is about.

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