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The Official VINTAGE T SHIRT KNOWLEDGE THREAD. - Page 10

post #136 of 162

Hi everybody! I've been lurking for a while and finally decided to make an account to present yesterday's find, a Coca Cola t-shirt from the London olympics. 3€ and it looks unworn.

 

I'm not even sure it qualifies as vintage, but I tried to look for stuff with some kind of a historical significance. (Well, historical interest is probably more appropriate.)

 

What do you reckon, worth it?

 

 

post #137 of 162
Nothing special here unfortunately. Shirt is from 2012 so not likely to be very rare and certainly not vintage. Welcome to the forum though! cheers.gif
post #138 of 162
Haven't posted in a few years but found this thread while I was trying to learn/document vintage shirts to help me identify a vintage shirt easier. Most this stuff was taken from defunkd vintage site andcompiled together.

1970's:
70sbrands.jpg
Identifying a vintage shirt from the 1970s is quite simple. For the most part, companies that were producing shirts for screen printing hadn’t started branding themselves yet. Many of these labels will appear fairly generic and not have any obvious link to a specific company. A lot of the time the tag will be completely blank or frayed as a result of wear, wash, and age. It wasn’t until the late ‘70s that the big t-shirt players and stronger branding images started to emerge.

Generic tag often indicates 1970's tag:


1980s:
80sbrands.jpg
Popular brands emerged in this decade. Some focused on producing a variety of colors, while others specialized in making different styles of shirts, including ringers and jerseys. Brands such as Screen Stars, Hanes and Sportswear were some of the most widely manufactured t-shirts. Each of these vintage brands went through different phases of label designs which can easily be linked to a particular period.
Some brands were produced in Pakistan, others began following Champion and manufactured tees for sports-related purposes. Labels such as Logo7, Artex, and Trench made many of the best t-shirts, jerseys and sweatshirts featuring popular athletic names, teams and styles in the 1980s.

1990's:
90sbrands.jpg
While many new big-name players emerged in the ‘90s, just as many faded away. Some companies merged together – for example, Screen Stars became Fruit of the Loom. Music and concert merchandising became even bigger business and had dedicated licensing brands like Brockum, Giant, and Gem. These companies didn’t actually manufacture t-shirts so they had their labels sewn in to other blanks produced by FOTL and Hanes.
post #139 of 162
Russell Athletic (1902-present)
Also known as Southern Manufacturing were one of the biggest manufacturers of sports jerseys in the US from the 1930s to the 1960s. They changed their name to Russell Athletic in 1960, so you can date tags that way.
Tags that say "Russell Southern" are pre-1960.
russell.gif

1950s:


Pre 1960s:


1960's:


1970's (gold tag):


1980's (gold tag):


Jerzees (1983-90's?)
Created in 1983 by Russel Athletic for sportswear.

1980's tag:


Late 80's-early 90's tag:


1992 tag:
post #140 of 162
Nike (late 70's-present):


Pinwheel (1978-1980):


Orange Sportswear (1980-1983):


Blue (1984-1988):


Not for resale 80's tag:


Grey (1989-1993):
post #141 of 162
Screen Stars (1980-present):
(Made in USA, Canada, Ireland, Mexico)


Super screen stars tag (late 70's? Early 80's) note the Tom under "s":

Blue 1980's:


1981 tag:


1980's blue tag:


Red markings on label: poly blend. Notice the TM under "STARS" indicating pre 1983. an R would indicate after 1983 (1980-1983):


Green markings on label: poly blend (80's):


Blue markings on label: 100% cotton (80's):


Screen Stars Best (introduced in 86?/87-90's, thicker and bigger shirt):


1994 tag:


1995 tag:


Late 90's tag:
http://s243.photobucket.com/user/givescaca/media/bric-a-brac/P1090365.jpg.html
Edited by thelion1856 - 7/17/16 at 9:30pm
post #142 of 162
I woul love to see this thread continue? I have had some good luck flipping tees. I would love some thoughts on vintage wrestling tees. I have found quite a few
post #143 of 162
How long do you tend to sit on a vintage t, and how much do they typically go for?
post #144 of 162
My last couple went during a normal 10 day auction time. It was a 2003 Rolling Stones tee. Only went for 15, but cost me a quarter.
post #145 of 162

I've really gotten some of my best flips from Tees, and I've only been into them for a year or so.  I generally just go by the hems, looking for the single-row style that indicates vintage, then choosing based on subject matter.  At first I picked up anything vintage, but that's led to a handful of shirts that I've sat on for months, nearly a year.  I'll probably just redonate those.  

 

However, some shirts sell within days or hours of listing.  They're typically Running/5k shirts, but there's a lot of random ones that go fast too.  

 

What bugs me though, are the shirts I'd expect to go fast that stick around forever.  I've got a Coca-cola/Special Olympics shirt I expected to do decent, but I guess not.  I figured with the Olympics this year those would do well.  Motorsports stuff is hit or miss too.  

 

Re: Price, I usually can get $10-15 for each, and $20 for good ones.  Not stellar, but that's a hell of a ROI on $1.

post #146 of 162
So that's my problem. Most of the vintage T's I find are $5-7/ea. I was wondering where the profit margin was. $0.25 would be sweet!

@Sleeves345, mind posting a pic of the type of hem you're talking about?
post #147 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClosetEvolution View Post

So that's my problem. Most of the vintage T's I find are $5-7/ea. I was wondering where the profit margin was. $0.25 would be sweet!

@Sleeves345, mind posting a pic of the type of hem you're talking about?

Salvation army near me has shirts for $1. I don't bother at GW, as they want too much.

Here's a quick phone pic:

Hard to see what I'm talking about, but the hem is a single row of small vertical stitches, like IIIIIIIIIII.
Modern stickers are two rows of horizontal stitches like =========. I might have better pics at home, I'll check later.

Careful though, Hollister and American apparel use the old style seam still.
post #148 of 162
Thanks for the tip! I'll have to start looking into that more.
post #149 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleeves345 View Post

Careful though, Hollister and American apparel use the old style seam still.

AE Outfitters as well. 

post #150 of 162

There, that's a clearer image. The stitches are often smaller than that, but this shows the pattern I mean.

 :cheers: 

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