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Bow ties - Page 2

post #16 of 24
I think one generally defines "affectation" as "something I'm not willing to wear." However, wearing bow ties in no way equates with carrying a cane or wearing a top hat. I would simply point to the fact that there are several companies that readily offer bow ties, including "mainstream" brands: Brook Bros., Talbott, Land's End, Ben Silver, Hanauer, Beau Ties, Bow Tie Club, Carrot & Gibbs. You may not like bow ties (clearly you do not), and you may think them fuddy-duddyish, which is fine. I'm sure you would consider much in my life that way (my politics would probably scare you to death). But they are part of traditional attire that have their place for this with the willingness to wear them. AlanC, M.A. (sorry, no PhD )
post #17 of 24
There's no reason to be so defensive. But, it seems hypocritical to defend bow ties while implying that top hots or canes are somehow a 'affectation.' I'm sure the dandys who carry a cane could also use similar logic, and point out 'mainstream' brands that also sell such items. Its funny that you included a company such as Bow Tie Club in such a list. It would be as if a defender of canes mentioned how Cane co. sells canes. Thus, canes are acceptable. I'm not arguing that bow ties were once part of traditional attire. But, then again, so were ascots, canes, and top hats. It just seems unnecessary how you denegrate a cane, but somehow insist that bow ties are somehow different. If I see someone who carries a cane, more likely than not, he's also wearing a bow tie.
post #18 of 24
I agree that a bow-tie can be a cry for attention, but so can a loud tie . . . and that fails to raise most eyebrows. I just happen to like the way bow-ties look. Also, I'm about to send a package of slightly soiled long ties to Tie-Crafters for cleaning. I hate having to do this, and it's not as if I'm a slob . . . but soup happens. (sorry)
post #19 of 24
Quote:
There's no reason to be so defensive. But, it seems hypocritical to defend bow ties while implying that top hots or canes are somehow a 'affectation.' I'm sure the dandys who carry a cane could also use similar logic, and point out 'mainstream' brands that also sell such items. Its funny that you included a company such as Bow Tie Club in such a list. It would be as if a defender of canes mentioned how Cane co. sells canes. Thus, canes are acceptable. I'm not arguing that bow ties were once part of traditional attire. But, then again, so were ascots, canes, and top hats. It just seems unnecessary how you denegrate a cane, but somehow insist that bow ties are somehow different. If I see someone who carries a cane, more likely than not, he's also wearing a bow tie.
I don't (and didn't) denigrate the carrying of canes or wearing of top hats (just see my avatar). I'm just saying they are not in the same level of general use as bow ties. The point of my list was the vibrant bow tie market. Clearly there are companies that sell canes and top hats. I somehow doubt there is quite as big a market for them. The companies I list are not money losing hobbies for their owners, but clearly they find it profitable to make and sell bow ties. People must be buying them. I find it not a great leap to think they might actually be wearing them. Bow Tie Club is not a secret society, but simply a web based business selling bow ties, which taken with the others, points to that vibrant market. Fuddy-duddy twits or not, there seem to be a lot of them. I am defending the bow tie, although I deny being defensive. This thread was started (not by me) to "Recover the bow tie", an idea that met with subsequent hostility ("twits" anyone?) from some quarters for some reason. As an unabashed bow tie wearer I rise to its defense. I continue to find the hostility the bow ties engenders among certain people here odd. I generally attribute it to a desire to appear as sophisticates. Bow ties are at least as acceptable as braces.
post #20 of 24
AlanC, let me assure you that I meant no personal offense, nor do I have any hostility, as such, towards those who wear bowties. If I have implied as much, I apologize. I was simply stating my personal opinion on the bow tie, albeit admittedly with a bit of wisecrackery. Whether or not I am trying to appear as a sophisticate, however, is my own business
post #21 of 24
Quote:
This thread was started (not by me) to "Recover the bow tie", an idea that met with subsequent hostility ("twits" anyone?) from some quarters for some reason. As an unabashed bow tie wearer I rise to its defense. I continue to find the hostility the bow ties engenders among certain people here odd. I generally attribute it to a desire to appear as sophisticates.
Its strange that you take great offense at those who criticize the bow tie, especially those who crossed the line by using the term 'twits.' Yet, in the same breath, you use an ad homenim attack on us by calling us 'fashionistas' who 'desire to appear as sophisticates.' Unless your MA was in psychology, perhaps you shouldn't attempt to psychoanalyze the members of this forum who simply disagree with your aesthetics.
post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 
Interesting series of comments. I am surprised at the hostility the thread has garnered. I started it simply curious how people who consider themselves fashionable or stylish would view the bow tie. I obviously wear them and I gave a few reasons in the initial post. In my opinion, having people assume I'm a twit because of my tie is fine with me. I'm sure many people on this posting board are assumed to be twits because they'd read a board about men's style and fashion. Who cares? Isn't the true essence of style and fashion presenting yourself confidently? Aren't the truely well-dressed among us not necessarily wearing the nicest clothes or the style of the moment? It isn't the piece but rather how you wear it that counts. Could I pull off a toga at work? No. There are boundaries and I think it's clear the bow tie is well within the realm of acceptable clothing especially with the fine fabrics, prints and patterns that are easily found. Maybe your taste runs one way or another and while it is true that people are more than willing to jump to conclusions at the slightest pretense; however, I find it endlessly amusing to embrace those pretenses and refute them by being myself. Am I a bit of a geek? Yes. Do I enjoy reading books? Yes. Do I vote Republican? No. Do I row crew and play football? Yes. Have I been in and won a bar fight? Yes. Whatever your assumptions about the bow tie wearer, like all stereotypes, it's flawed and you're only cheating yourself by engaging in such behavior. Is it natural to do so? Of course. However, after reading these posts, if as an added side benefit, I'm showing you and others that jumping to conclusions about people for superficial reasons is a mistake - I'll order another 6 bow ties today. Thanks.
post #23 of 24
I am a criminal trial attorney in an urban area. I wear a bow tie about once a week just for a change. Primarily they are from Charvet and T&A purchased every now and then over a 20 year period. I long ago stopped worrying about what someone thinks. I do know if juries or judges care, it doesn't trickle down to their rulings or verdicts.
post #24 of 24
Quote:
I long ago stopped worrying about what someone thinks.  
That's fine if you don't mind what others think of you. But, to me, this attitude seems reckless becuase you are also responsible for your client as well. Look at some of the strong reactions some people are having about a bow tie. Some people don't trust somebody who wears one. What if a person like this gets on a jury deciding your client's fate?
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