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Nicholas Templeman: A Bespoke Shoemaker - Page 16

post #226 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

Cut edge to cut edge.

The bulkiness of seam depends on several factors - leather thickness, how compressible the leather is, thread thickness etc.
Thanks, you made a surgical job there 😄
post #227 of 371
Beautiful work so far.

Is that considered "raised lake" or "split raised lake," according to the diagram posted earlier by dieworkwear?
post #228 of 371
That one is a split raised lake.
post #229 of 371
Nicholas:

On a split, raised lake, do they score the leather after they've stitched the seam, or before?

Also, if there is adjustment needed to the last after the welted fitting, how often is the welt removed and the upper entirely re-lasted on the adjusted last, vs. just adjusting the last and using it to stretch the upper on the existing welt? How hard is it to successfully re-last and inseam a previously lasted upper, given how little lasting margin is left after the welt and upper have been trimmed for the fitting?
post #230 of 371
Split the lake before sewing, mark the centre line on the leather and gently score with your knife. Doing it after is probably doable but would possibly release some tension on the threads, and seems like it would be a headache to do neatly.

Depends what you need to adjust - if you've got the width/outline wrong then any reblock will be a compromise as the insole won't stretch, the upper will just be forced off the edge of it.

If the width is good but you've just got the measures a little off then you can reasonably manipulate the upper leather, just like a tailor will do with a hot iron, stretching and shrinking the material to the correct size and shape. Shrinking is more of a compromise than stretching, and there's only so much you can do before the pattern gets thrown off.

Relasting and rewelting isn't too much of a problem - the shape is already in place so there's not so much actual lasting required and you don't need as much lasting allowance - provided you've not drastically increased the size of the last. You can stitch a runner around the edge to give you some more allowance, but they usually get in the way.

A bit of a hatchet method of adjustment is to gore the insole, you can get tons of extra width and avoid rewelting, just sew some insole into the gore and you'd never even notice the difference. Good to adjust old shoes that have been grown out of, probably not the most moral way of adjusting someone's brand new shoes though.

So yeah, it depends on how much adjustment you need, and where. Try and avoid it by getting the last right wherever possible.
post #231 of 371
Thread Starter 
For those who may be interested, Nicholas is coming to the US next month. His tour schedule:
Quote:
New York City
April 6th and 7th (Wednesday and Thursday)
The Benjamin Hotel at 125 E. 50th Street

Boston
April 8th and 9th (Friday and Saturday)
The Eliot Hotel at 370 Commonwealth Avenue

San Francisco
April 11th and 12th (Monday and Tuesday)
Westin St. Francis at Union Square

Note, he may be showing with Steed in NYC at The Kimberly Hotel, but he can also take appointments back in his room at The Benjamin. You can book appointments through his website.

http://www.nicholastempleman.com/travel.html

Even if you're unsure whether you'll order, it might be good to stop by to get your measurements taken. Fittings can sometimes be done remotely, but measurements have to be taken in person.
post #232 of 371
I was browsing Nicholas' website and saw a pair of shoes with buttons instead of laces. I've seen other bespoke shoemakers offer such styles and was wondering how practical they are in real life. I'd be worried that a button would pop off while trying to fasten my shoes. Anyone have experience with them?
post #233 of 371
If they fit properly and you have a button hook, there shouldn't be any problem.

They're not hugely practical, maybe not worth wearing them to the gym in case you haven't packed your button hook etc, but nothing to cause much concern.
post #234 of 371

Justin Fitzpatrick (Westlake boot) and Septieme Largeur (Arsene boot) both offer boots that button that are not bespoke, I hear that it is not the fastest or easiest method, but there are hooks which can be used to help fasten the buttons. There are videos on the Justin Fitzpatrick website of how to fasten the buttons by hand (which is not possible with all button boots) and with hook. I imagine shoes would be similar to boots.

 

Edit: beaten to the punch, but by the person who would know best

post #235 of 371
Ha!

A hook is pretty essential if you're going buttons, I think Abbeyhorn do some nice ones. A lady customer many years ago where I once worked received her pair knee high button boots, and she was delighted with them. A few months later, however, she returned - rather upset that half the buttons had been plucked off and her poor nails had been savagely chipped away following what must have been far too many hours of frustrated buttoning.

I'll never forget the look on her face that day, when she set eyes upon a button hook for the first time.

post #236 of 371
^^ Very interesting, thanks for the replies. Had no idea there was something called a button hook. I suppose it is as indispensable as a shoe horn when you wear such shoes!

Hope I didn't derail the thread, though the story about your lady client was hilarious!
post #237 of 371
Back in the days when balmoral boots were the go-to choice of gentlemanly footwear, buttoned models were still popular. Then the first great war came and broke the old dress culture, also making oxfords the first choice in the 1920s. After this, button models died out quickly...but there have always been a few bold dudes or makers that have offered them. I like their look, but I can understand why they've disappeared as well. Not really handy, these.
post #238 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

If they fit properly and you have a button hook, there shouldn't be any problem.
They're not hugely practical, maybe not worth wearing them to the gym in case you haven't packed your button hook etc, but nothing to cause much concern.


Cleverley in London will make a bespoke version for the scatter-brained or lazy, where the buttons are (presumably) non-functional and the boot is opened and closed with a zip. (I believe, David Beckham owns a pair of those.)





post #239 of 371
Thread Starter 
One more for the thread. Photo isn't that clear, but these are Vox's Templeman-made oxfords

post #240 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

Cleverley in London will make a bespoke version for the scatter-brained or lazy, where the buttons are (presumably) non-functional and the boot is opened and closed with a zip. (I believe, David Beckham owns a pair of those.)






Not a fan of that zipper. Wonder if one can hide elastic under those buttons to make them slip ons......
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