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Nicholas Templeman: A Bespoke Shoemaker - Page 15

post #211 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy57 View Post

And I do not think the shoes Nicholas is making for me, whatever they might be called, are at all country shoes.

Well, brown grain leather with a split toe and Norwegian model is as country as it gets. These were historically worn on the British countryside for much longer than in the city, where they crept in somewhere after the 1920s. At least this is what my reference books tell me. Now, it's debatable whether the golden "rules" apply today...but a dark, smooth leather oxford is much more city by all accounts. These are what most of the big city boys wear today. Anyhow, this pair looks wonderful.
post #212 of 371
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

Well, brown grain leather with a split toe and Norwegian model is as country as it gets. These were historically worn on the British countryside for much longer than in the city, where they crept in somewhere after the 1920s. At least this is what my reference books tell me. Now, it's debatable whether the golden "rules" apply today...but a dark, smooth leather oxford is much more city by all accounts. These are what most of the big city boys wear today. Anyhow, this pair looks wonderful.

What I mean is that it doesn't it doesn't feel like a hunt shoe, which is the spirit of the Weston Chasse/ Demi-Chasse. Maybe Andy specified something different, but the photo makes me think that the shoes are shaping up to be something like Nicholas' Norwegian sample -- which is certainly country inspired, but more refined and sophisticated than the JMW Demi-Chasse or JL Paris Norway. Or even the EG Dovers, which kind of ride the line between city and country.





StC has the 633 split toe, which can be made in a pebble grain. Not sure I would call that a real country shoe either, given the shaping.

Anyway, I agree with Andy that whatever it is, it looks great.
post #213 of 371
ˆYou are right, I forgot to add the bit about the last. There are several details that affect the formality of a shoe and, let's face it, most of the people we meet either won't care about very nice shoes or will simply think that we have very nice shoes. "The Rules" have mostly been forgotten or scrapped...but then again, we are on Styleforum and this is the 4th dimension.

Well, I can only carp, grouse and hope that no very nice Norwegian pair (whether black or brown or something else) ends up with the company of dark suits. There are many other shoes that complement the smart suit so much better.
post #214 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

ˆYou are right, I forgot to add the bit about the last. There are several details that affect the formality of a shoe and, let's face it, most of the people we meet either won't care about very nice shoes or will simply think that we have very nice shoes. "The Rules" have mostly been forgotten or scrapped...but then again, we are on Styleforum and this is the 4th dimension.

Well, I can only carp, grouse and hope that no very nice Norwegian pair (whether black or brown or something else) ends up with the company of dark suits. There are many other shoes that complement the smart suit so much better.

I think lake derbies with or without split toe, made on classic lasts, have been quite common business formal shoes in Italy since the 1960's
post #215 of 371

I love NST (JMW Demis/Dover among them).  They are some of the most versatile shoes I own.  They match with jeans and suits, but of course, I do not work in the City. Even my robust Alden shell nº 8 NST match my suits perfectly.  Only if you add norveges stitching and grain leather  you can take them to the countryside IMO.  And of course, I would never think to take those beautiful NST from Nicholas on a trip to the high lands.

post #216 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

Well, I can only carp, grouse and hope that no very nice Norwegian pair (whether black or brown or something else) ends up with the company of dark suits. There are many other shoes that complement the smart suit so much better.

 

My commission from Nicholas is not intended to be worn with dark suits. I see this pair as more summery, more on the lighter side.

 

When I think of country shoes, I think of Edward Green Cardiffs or Ullswaters (which I'm wearing today). And, really, there is only one city and I do not visit there very often. And when I do visit, I still don't frequent the city, but I hang out in Mayfair and Kensington, mostly. I think that probably counts as "country". :)

post #217 of 371
Kensington Gardens arguably counts as the country.
post #218 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

Kensington Gardens arguably counts as the country.


My thoughts exactly.

post #219 of 371


What's known in the trade as the "try on in welt".
post #220 of 371
Thread Starter 
My Temopleman NSTs are shaping up:


post #221 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

My Temopleman NSTs are shaping up:


Excellent. The apron stitch is showing that fine English trait of "stiff upper lip."
post #222 of 371
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by atia2 View Post

Excellent. The apron stitch is showing that fine English trait of "stiff upper lip."

Thanks. Nicholas tells me that once the uppers are properly lasted, the toe seam should pop out a bit more and the ridge on the apron should flatten out some, which is what I requested. I like how they look thus far though.

Here's something fun -- a pair of Templeman-made elasticized oxfords for Steven HItchcock. The toe medallion is in the shape of a fish, which I assume was something Steven requested because he's a fisherman.





post #223 of 371

is that where my goldfish went?

post #224 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

My Temopleman NSTs are shaping up:



can I ask if these so call skin stitch on the toe tip is done putting side by side two flat pieces of leather ? There is no fold as such, right? I have struggled to fully understand why some have thickness under it and some are completely flat.
Edited by marcodalondra - 3/6/16 at 6:34am
post #225 of 371
Cut edge to cut edge.

The bulkiness of seam depends on several factors - leather thickness, how compressible the leather is, thread thickness etc.
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