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Nicholas Templeman: A Bespoke Shoemaker - Page 12

post #166 of 371

^ awestruck by those.

post #167 of 371
I wish this site allowed me to give infinite thumbs.
post #168 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post


You are a very very talented guy! Wow!
post #169 of 371
Thread Starter 
Possibly of interest to future Templeman customers? Nicholas was nice enough to make some sample aprons for me when I couldn't decide on what to get for a pair of NSTs. I shot some photos to solicit some opinions from friends, but then decided to post them in here in case anyone in the future found them helpful.

Included is a "pie crust"/ split-and-lift apron, as you would find on Edward Green. Then there's Nicholas' braided apron -- one where the braid is on both sides, and another where there's a braid only on one side (for a more understated look)




Edited by dieworkwear - 2/13/16 at 2:38pm
post #170 of 371
Thanks for putting those up. And an inverted pie crust, no less!
post #171 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post
 

Forgot to plop these in here too, didn't I.

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

   geesh that's some great work

post #172 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Included is a "pie crust"/ split-and-lift apron, as you would find on Edward Green. Then there's Nicholas' braided apron -- one where the braid is on both sides, and another where there's a braid only on one side (for a more understated look)
 

Which did you end up going with?

post #173 of 371
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

Which did you end up going with?

Actually still to be determined, but I promised Nicholas I would settle on a style by Wednesday. I'm leaning towards a simpler design though, so no braiding.

Here's something that might also be helpful to future customers -- a drawing Nicholas sent to me of various hand stitching techniques for aprons. More options here than what's pictured above. I'm between the raised lake on the upper left hand corner and the "pie crust"/ split and lift apron, like you'd see on Edward Greens.

post #174 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Here's something that might also be helpful to future customers -- a drawing Nicholas sent to me of various hand stitching techniques for aprons.


The underside of the 'flat seam' ('this side for split toe') is also known in the forum here as 'Frankenstitch'.
post #175 of 371

Is the Pie Crust the most difficult to execute out of the 3 techniques?.   I really like it.

 

Excellent info and pics.  Thanks you both.


Edited by Zapasman - 2/15/16 at 12:31am
post #176 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


Actually still to be determined, but I promised Nicholas I would settle on a style by Wednesday. I'm leaning towards a simpler design though, so no braiding.

Here's something that might also be helpful to future customers -- a drawing Nicholas sent to me of various hand stitching techniques for aprons. More options here than what's pictured above. I'm between the raised lake on the upper left hand corner and the "pie crust"/ split and lift apron, like you'd see on Edward Greens.
 

 

Spoilering because not from Templeman - (Click to show)
Got something like this for my black plaintoes - from Meccariello -  he said it was related to the pie crust/'infra carne' in italian but slightly different (I don't know how)
 

 

His wife doing the sewing


Edited by venividivicibj - 2/14/16 at 10:28pm
post #177 of 371

^That one  seems to be ornamentally stitched like figure nº1 (no stabbed).

 

Nicholas, what is the difference between figures 2 (split raised lake) and 5 (raised lake different leathers)?.  Do you use the toe skin stitched/round close technique as well?.

 

Excellent work, thanks.

post #178 of 371
That Meccariello stitch is essentially a flat seam/skin stitch without the seam - only going halfway through the leather, and puckering up slightly when the threads are tightened, but not as puckered as a raised lake a la fig.a. Highly Technical Diagram incoming:



The split raised lake is where the whole vamp is one piece, lake and sides, and you gently score your knife around the centre of the raised area for decoration. No different to the one next to it, technically. The one from two different leathers is used for things like the pie crust; for styles that necessitate a seperate lake (longer tongues for boots or wholecut derbies); or if you want to get all fancy with contrasting leathers.

Pie crust and flat seam are the fiddliest I guess, anything where you have to get the awl to come out the middle of a cut edge of 1.2mm leather repeatedly is going to be a bit scary. Different approaches are required for each, you can use a saddlers clam for a raised lake if you like, but for a flat seam you need a curved surface and a variety of straps and clamping devices to help you get the angle right. Some people use a milk bottle glued to a plate to hold the leather on, some others prefer a different shape like a glenfiddich bottle or something. Depends what whisky you like essentially.
post #179 of 371
Thanks again, very instructive.
post #180 of 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

 Highly Technical Diagram incoming:
 

:fu:

 

:lol:

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