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Best quality/price suit - Page 3

post #31 of 42
I think you need to go a suit that is both fashionable and decently priced such as HUGO BOSS.As much as I respect the opinions of others because great designers have been named I think that for NOW you will be better off not worring about whether a sit is canvased or the quality of the stiching is. Boss or Pal Zileri will get you far.
post #32 of 42
I have to disagree with much that has been written on this thread about custom versus RTW. I think people are trying to characterize a moving target. The longevity of better garments is not due to their construction, but their fabric. Most seams that loosen for example, can be easily repaired. Even linings can be sewn or replaced (I had to have a lining extensively repaired on a coat that is 30 years old for example). But fabric that develops a shine or becomes worn, cannot be fixed. I do not think there is any reason a custom garment will last longer than RTW, except perhaps because you treasure it more. On the other hand, I also disagree that custom is an "advanced topic" that one should only try after much experience with RTW. As many who have followed my adventures here and on Ask Andy, this was the same objection posed to my acquiring bespoke and everyone who posted, even in this demanding bunch, complimented my suit from Centofanti, my first. I just had to do a bit of research so that I had a vocabulary with which to make requests when I ordered. But my second order was effortless. I think the answer is, it depends. If you are a difficult fit and RTW never fits you even with alterations, then go for it. But RTW will almost always be cheaper for similar quality of fabric. The cheapest jacket bespoke will not cost less than 1500 dollars, except a Chan-like deal. The best jackets in the world from eBay sellars will cost less than 900 dollars. FOR ME, someone who is fussy about pants fit but whom some models fit well, RTW works fine, more for sportjackets than suits. But ordering bespoke from Centofanti, admittedly one of the best tailors in the USA by common accolation, has been an unbelievable pleasure. I can pick the most incredible fabrics and get garments one could NEVER find in a store at ANY price. We talk casually as if one can purchase ANYTHING RTW, when this is simply not true. Double-breasteds are fewer and fewer. Subtle patterns that have life are few and far between. If one wants ticket pockets or special features, you are even more out of luck. FOR ME, a COMBINATION is perfect, because both have their virtues. When I post pictures of my double-breasted herringbone from Centofanti based on the De Sica jacket whose picture was posted on London Lounge, you will see what I mean.
post #33 of 42
Quote:
I have to disagree with much that has been written on this thread about custom versus RTW. I think people are trying to characterize a moving target. The longevity of better garments is not due to their construction, but their fabric. Most seams that loosen for example, can be easily repaired. Even linings can be sewn or replaced (I had to have a lining extensively repaired on a coat that is 30 years old for example). But fabric that develops a shine or becomes worn, cannot be fixed. I do not think there is any reason a custom garment will last longer than RTW, except perhaps because you treasure it more. On the other hand, I also disagree that custom is an "advanced topic" that one should only try after much experience with RTW. As many who have followed my adventures here and on Ask Andy, this was the same objection posed to my acquiring bespoke and everyone who posted, even in this demanding bunch, complimented my suit from Centofanti, my first. I just had to do a bit of research so that I had a vocabulary with which to make requests when I ordered. But my second order was effortless. I think the answer is, it depends. If you are a difficult fit and RTW never fits you even with alterations, then go for it. But RTW will almost always be cheaper for similar quality of fabric. The cheapest jacket bespoke will not cost less than 1500 dollars, except a Chan-like deal. The best jackets in the world from eBay sellars will cost less than 900 dollars. FOR ME, someone who is fussy about pants fit but whom some models fit well, RTW works fine, more for sportjackets than suits. But ordering bespoke from Centofanti, admittedly one of the best tailors in the USA by common accolation, has been an unbelievable pleasure. I can pick the most incredible fabrics and get garments one could NEVER find in a store at ANY price. We talk casually as if one can purchase ANYTHING RTW, when this is simply not true. Double-breasteds are fewer and fewer. Subtle patterns that have life are few and far between. If one wants ticket pockets or special features, you are even more out of luck. FOR ME, a COMBINATION is perfect, because both have their virtues. When I post pictures of my double-breasted herringbone from Centofanti based on the De Sica jacket whose picture was posted on London Lounge, you will see what I mean.
Personally speaking, there's no way I would have been comfortable just walking into a tailor's shop and getting a custom suit--I need to know the ins and outs of exactly what I'm getting, why I getting what I am, and what makes what I'm getting so good. But that's just me. koji
post #34 of 42
Quote:
The longevity of better garments is not due to their construction, but their fabric. Most seams that loosen for example, can be easily repaired. Even linings can be sewn or replaced (I had to have a lining extensively repaired on a coat that is 30 years old for example). But fabric that develops a shine or becomes worn, cannot be fixed. I do not think there is any reason a custom garment will last longer than RTW, except perhaps because you treasure it more.
One caveat to that statement: one must define "better" to the exclusion of most if not all fused suits. I have some fused, machine made RTW suits made from very similar fabrics to my custom suits--e.g. super 110s from Reda and VBC. The RTW suits are a great illustration of the importance of canvased construction, and careful handwork in the most visible areas. Over time the RTW suits have sagged around the coat pockets (of course, unsealing them didn't help there, even though I don't put things in them), and there is puckering on the lapels and at some seams. The custom suits do not have these problems, nor would I expect to see them in a full-canvas RTW suit.
post #35 of 42
This is comparing apples with oranges. A fused RTW suit of course will be as durable as a canvassed bespoke one. But this is not a useful comparison.
post #36 of 42
Doc, I think you meant "won't be as durable." By the way, biggest difference between fused and canvassed IMO -- comfort... A canvas suit is light as a feather, while even the lightest fused suits tire out the body after a day of wearing.
post #37 of 42
Doc, I also meant to ask you, what in your opinion makes a durable fabric? Personally, I love the Vitale Barberis Super 130s (Revenge line) fabric that was used for my Chan suit, but it certainly is a more delicately handed fabric than, say, the Oxxford I have. But does that give any indication about "shine" potential?
post #38 of 42
Quote:
This is comparing apples with oranges. A fused RTW suit of course will be as durable as a canvassed bespoke one. But this is not a useful comparison.
I don't disagree at all. But not everyone reads "better" and understands it the same way.
post #39 of 42
Quote:
I think the answer is, it depends. If you are a difficult fit and RTW never fits you even with alterations, then go for it. But RTW will almost always be cheaper for similar quality of fabric. The cheapest jacket bespoke will not cost less than 1500 dollars, except a Chan-like deal. The best jackets in the world from eBay sellars will cost less than 900 dollars.
don't know who you're going to, but for my last two jackets I paid $300 (in LA) and $425 (in NYC) from two different bespoke tailors. Both turned out solid work that fits me far better than OTR. I'm very close to a perfect 42 long, but they just drape better, move better, feel better. I brought up the whole MTM / custom / bespoke thing precisely for the reason articulated above by a couple of our colleagues here, who point out that most men don't wear clothes that fit. They think a suit and tie is confining and uncomfortable, whereas I nearly always feel much better fully dressed than in a pair of jeans (I'm weird that way, I guess). For our protagonist's first Real Suit, I hope he goes at least the MTM route (or, okay, okay, gets a very good OTR and then spends a couple of bills on tailoring). Make sure it fits.
post #40 of 42
I find it hard to believe that a tailor could make a fully bespoke suit for $300 including the cost of fabric and make a living unless it was a total hack job. Perhaps for something fused, based off a pre-existing pattern... but otherwise, assuming the fabric costs, even $100, and assuming it takes 8 hours to make, etc..., and assuming it fits perfectly the first time w/o any realterations, and much time doing subsequent alterations, that's not a very good hourly rate for labor.
post #41 of 42
Yeah, those prices sound too low. I mean, most people will not find clothing from a good tailor that cheap. Remember, that won't cover just the material in most fine suits. Sorry about the typo, I of course meant that fused would not last as long as canvassed. Though to be clear, I do not know for sure because I have never had a fused garment for that long. My dad's clothes are all canvassed (I am pretty sure). The basic assertion that well-fitting clothes last longer than poorly-fitting clothes, I just do not believe it, unless we are talking about extremes. And in any event, RTW is not necessarily poorly-fitting, both because many people find a model that fits them well, and because alterations are possible. Remember, I am not dissing bespoke, which I think is great. But the greatest tailor in the world cannot make a lousy fabric look better or last longer. So far as what I consider to be long-wearing, given my limited experience (I recently built my wardrobe as many of you know), my impressions are derived from my father's wardrobe. My impression is that heavier fabrics last a very long time. By report, the finer fabrics lack longevity (note I am describing two separate unrelated dimensions, weight and fineness). I personally try to avoid anything finer than super 120's. I have no reason to consider finer fabrics. There are so many other factors that influence the softness of a fabric, I have no reason to be concerned about this number. I am also phobic of numbers. It reminds me of the thread-count wars, which I followed in the Sunday circulars for years.
post #42 of 42
Finer fabrics, and ones with softer hand, do tend to be the ones that go shiny fastest in my experience. And for whatever reason, blues seem to exhibit wear sooner than grays in comparable fabric. I've been told that by sales people and tailors, but didn't really believe it until I had two suits from essentially the same cloth in blue and gray (a VBC super 110s worsted), and the blue one definitely started to take on a shine faster. Two ways you can really save wear and tear: avoid sitting on leather chairs, and never wear nylon luggage or briefcases over your shoulder. Leather chairs will accelerate the "shiny seat" process on your trousers, and the friction of nylon against your clothes can do bad things. I have a good flannel suit with pilling on the hip and side of the leg, courtesy of my garment bag.
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