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Chinese translation needed

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
This is a text inlaid in mother-of-pearl in the stock on a flintlock fowling-piece that I have my clammy hands on at the moment...the value is more or less a given, unless the inscription is particularly interesting...any takers? TIA, LS
post #2 of 14
but heres a general idea (in mandarin): First photo: Two lines here, the first being the right-most side (being read from Top to Bottom): qi yi ke xiang Honor/Loyalty to be emulated (hard to translate the first bit directly. Basically a concept of an honorable quality combining honor and loyalty in friends or your gang/army/group/triad) Second line Left-most side (read from Top to Bottom): qi wei ke wei Aura of Force to be feared (again hard to translate the meaning - we use this word "wei" to describe someone who exudes an aura and feeling of power, grandness)
post #3 of 14
2nd photo (from right most line to left most line, read from top to bottom) Brings lightning out of the ordinary, making everyone cover their ears Thundering into the scene, with everyone knowing his name 2nd photo paints a small picture of majestic/grand this person is (a very flattering picture) - describing the commotion, force and ruckus when he arrives/passes and that everyone knew him
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Toiletduck! I will, of course, present the translation as my own. It's a European-made gun of not bad quality, and apparently decorated with the MOP inlay in China, and then given as a sort of honorary gift. I'll post pics of it when they're taken. Brings lightning out of the ordinary, making everyone cover their ears Thundering into the scene, with everyone knowing his name I'm considering this as my new signature.
post #5 of 14
You have a fun job, don't you LS?
post #6 of 14
It looks like some sort of rosewood?
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby View Post
You have a fun job, don't you LS?
Fun, but overly busy sometimes. I've had three sixty-hour workweeks in a row now. Compared to the Wall St types it may not be much, but for an art historian with a lazy disposition it's a full plate.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
It looks like some sort of rosewood?
I don't have it handy here, but I think you're right.
post #8 of 14
"The blue-haired lady will make a good sacrifice."
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
"The blue-haired lady will make a good sacrifice."
Pics:
post #10 of 14
Dear lad, what fine piece you have there! Coul you provide a closer shot of the checkering? Is the left side lock plate wood or is that engraved metal? Who is the gunmaker? Inquiring minds want to know!
post #11 of 14
The entire wooden piece looks like it was carved in China as the style is typical of the Chinese taste for Western ornament. It appears a late 19th century piece? A very lovely piece of work.
post #12 of 14
LS - no problem Wow. that is a beautiful piece of work, perhaps in a few years I shall start looking at purchasing expensive artwork (once I can afford heheh)
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flylot74 View Post
Dear lad, what fine piece you have there! Coul you provide a closer shot of the checkering? Is the left side lock plate wood or is that engraved metal? Who is the gunmaker? Inquiring minds want to know!
I'll see if the photographer can be pestered into taking a few more... It's a late 18th/early 19th century fowling-piece - smooth-bored, very long, narrow barrel, short fore-end on the stock. Oddly, there's a primitive diopter-type back sight, which contradicts the use as a fowling gun, which would, of course, be shot in the same manner as a modern shotgun. It might have been intended for hunting water-birds, say duck or wading birds, which can be shot sitting, and can actually be aimed at. The side plate is just a screw throught the left side of the stock, as is often the case with late flintlocks and early percussions. There are no markings whatsoever, but the quality of the hardware is fairly high.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
The entire wooden piece looks like it was carved in China as the style is typical of the Chinese taste for Western ornament. It appears a late 19th century piece? A very lovely piece of work.
I think your theory is right - the wood does look like rosewood, and the inlaid and carved decoration is without doubt Chinese. The buttplate and trigger-guard/grip is bronze, which makes me think it was made in China as well. I'd say the age is around 1800, judging from the type of lock, barrel and other European hardware.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toiletduck View Post
LS - no problem Wow. that is a beautiful piece of work, perhaps in a few years I shall start looking at purchasing expensive artwork (once I can afford heheh)
These guns are surprisingly cheap - say $1.000 to 2.000. (Few people collect these types.) A Chinese buyer might be willing to pay a bit more for the Chinese aspect, of course.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Strike View Post
I'll see if the photographer can be pestered into taking a few more...

It's a late 18th/early 19th century fowling-piece - smooth-bored, very long, narrow barrel, short fore-end on the stock. Oddly, there's a primitive diopter-type back sight, which contradicts the use as a fowling gun, which would, of course, be shot in the same manner as a modern shotgun. It might have been intended for hunting water-birds, say duck or wading birds, which can be shot sitting, and can actually be aimed at.

The side plate is just a screw throught the left side of the stock, as is often the case with late flintlocks and early percussions. There are no markings whatsoever, but the quality of the hardware is fairly high.



I think your theory is right - the wood does look like rosewood, and the inlaid and carved decoration is without doubt Chinese. The buttplate and trigger-guard/grip is bronze, which makes me think it was made in China as well. I'd say the age is around 1800, judging from the type of lock, barrel and other European hardware.



These guns are surprisingly cheap - say $1.000 to 2.000. (Few people collect these types.) A Chinese buyer might be willing to pay a bit more for the Chinese aspect, of course.

Wow, how do you attain this type of knowledge.
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