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The art of properly wearing a tuxedo - Page 2

post #16 of 20
Leo Jay-- The poster wrote, "If you're a man, it doesn't matter . . . what you're wearing." I would call that "disputing paying attention to style." What am I missing?
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Leo Jay-- The poster wrote, "If you're a man, it doesn't matter . . . what you're wearing."   I would call that "disputing paying attention to style." What am I missing?
Again, I think that was in reference to concern about OTHER people's approval...
post #18 of 20
In my opinion, there are three requirements for black tie: 1. The jacket should be peak lapeled or shawl lapeled (no notch lapels); 2. The bow tie should be black and hand tied; and 3. The shoes should have no broguing. Everything else falls into the category of personal style.  Always keep in mind, however, that the primary purpose of a tuxedo is not to call attention to you, but to provide a neutral backdrop to showcase what your female companion is wearing.  (Perhaps that is what PHV was getting at.)  So long as you make your wife look good, that's all that matters.
post #19 of 20
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Quote:
(Will @ 28 Sep. 2004, 09:31) John, One wears either braces/suspenders or self-supporting trousers. The other choice is either waistcoat, sash, or cummerbund with a single breasted dinner jacket. Will
I hate to disagree with Will, but I must... his first statement is correct - one wears either self supporting trousers or braces - never a belt. The other is not a choice - one either wears a cummerbund or vest with a single breasted dinner jacket or one wears a double breasted  dinner jacket which remains buttoned at all times. No well dressed man ever shows the waistband of his trousers when wearing a dinner suit - period. There is no either/or - one's trousers must stay up and one's waist must be covered, there are no exceptions.
Actually, one should always wear one's dinner jacket buttoned, regardless of whether single or double-breasted. And this is coming from one of those preppy, Ivy League types, who has attended more black-tie events since prep, Harvard, et al. than he cares to remember.,
post #20 of 20
Quote:
In my opinion, there are three requirements for black tie: 1. The jacket should be peak lapeled or shawl lapeled (no notch lapels); 2. The bow tie should be black and hand tied; and 3. The shoes should have no broguing. Everything else falls into the category of personal style.  Always keep in mind, however, that the primary purpose of a tuxedo is not to call attention to you, but to provide a neutral backdrop to showcase what your female companion is wearing.  (Perhaps that is what PHV was getting at.)  So long as you make your wife look good, that's all that matters.
Why not. These three rules seem particularly well-suited to the occasion. I agree.
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