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The official thrift/discount store bragging thread - Part II (Return to the Thunderdome) - Page 1772

post #26566 of 51252
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeachamLake View Post

Never posted in this thread before, but I enjoy reading it and doing some thrifting myself when I can. It's a little harder here in the UK - seems like most of the stuff is junk - but if you know where to look you can find some good stuff.

A selection of things I found over the past few months, all sold now: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Chester Barrie Hopsack Blazer (last year's collection apparently!)

AppleMark


AppleMark


Polo Cashmere Wool Herringbone Tweed. Looked never worn
AppleMark


AppleMark


G&H evening shirt
AppleMark


Crazy Ferragamo tie



Scabal 7 fold paisley tie...never seen these before. Didn't even know they did accessories 


Couple of Burberry trench coats, the Navy one was tagged as a production sample
AppleMark


AppleMark


AppleMark


Finally, not thrifted, but I saw this insane Tom Ford velvet jacket in TK Maxx the other day, and knew I had to try it on. Sadly it didn't fit and was a little too much, but it was worth it for the brilliantly disgusted face the guy manning the fitting rooms gave me when I walked in holding it. 




This is how you do a first post!
post #26567 of 51252
Would you guys buy an old EZ Tindari suit in your size with a few moth holes (small, on pants and relatively inconspicuous.)



And trying to figure out if this EZ is an orphan. Same donor, my size.
post #26568 of 51252
My dry spell continues on here in the UK. Tried some new places further afield to try and shake up my thrift game but ended up with one item ffs. Tempted to have a week off and let the stores rotate a bit.

*sigh*
post #26569 of 51252
In the field. Anybody want me to proxy?
post #26570 of 51252
Quote:
Originally Posted by GetBlatzed View Post

In the field. Anybody want me to proxy?

Awww man if only that was Dancin' Grannies 2 I would've asked you.
post #26571 of 51252
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeachamLake View Post

 

Finally, not thrifted, but I saw this insane Tom Ford velvet jacket in TK Maxx the other day, and knew I had to try it on. Sadly it didn't fit and was a little too much, but it was worth it for the brilliantly disgusted face the guy manning the fitting rooms gave me when I walked in holding it. 

 

 

That thing is awesome! Sit on it for a week or two, kop a discounted gift card, and go back. Hell, it's what I did :smarmy:

 

Gift card kept me right at the 10% rule.

Sorry, @ChetB , tallied up the thumbs from that last post and I had to do it :lol:

 

 

 

 

post #26572 of 51252
@Denton look at the bottom left corner of the size tag.EZ tags usually point out if it's a jacket or suit.
post #26573 of 51252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denton View Post

Would you guys buy an old EZ Tindari suit in your size with a few moth holes (small, on pants and relatively inconspicuous.) Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



And trying to figure out if this EZ is an orphan. Same donor, my size.

Looks like an orphan. I would Kopp on cheap. But would you really wear dated suits?
post #26574 of 51252
2nd vintage peacoat this week. This one is pre-1947 and in unbelievable shape.

post #26575 of 51252
Quote:
Originally Posted by hooker4186 View Post

Those are Alfred Sargent. Likely those were for Polo Ralph Lauren or less likely for J Crew.

Edit: since you're in the UK those could be for a UK shop of some sort or just straight Alfred Sargent even.
Those look to be alfred sargent x orvis.
post #26576 of 51252
I originally wrote/posted this in November of 2013. I thought it might be an appropriate time to quote myself as we have a bunch of new posters recently smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by HansderHund 
I've been following conversations and posts and there have been some great things posted. Well done all around. I've also noticed a number of new members posting, which is great. I put this together quickly to help get started.

Welcome! You probably have a few questions, so let’s look at the most popular:
  • Why is everyone here an asshole?
  • What is this worth?
  • Is this a thing?
  • What are the best stores in my area?
  • I’m just trying to improve my wardrobe and want simple answers!



Why is everyone here an asshole?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I don’t think anyone here is inherently an asshole. I’ve dealt with a number of people here and can honestly say that I don’t have problems with anyone. Some are a bit more abrasive than others. Some have opinions with which I disagree. Having said that, no one has yet to steal things, not return favors, etc.

This is the internet. This is also a place where people share a hobby and enjoy perfecting it. This is the perfect environment for people to develop strong opinions. It would be no different if you ventured into any other type of specialized forum and broke long-standing, albeit unwritten, rules.

What is this worth? Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
It’s worth what someone will pay you. That’s not sarcastic, that’s the truth. This thread isn’t about estimating the value of your finds. For starters, it depends on quite a few factors: age, style, condition, size, etc. It’s not easy to do considering all of the variables and people here generally don’t like to do it, especially for newer members. In order to employ the double standard, you'll often see long-standing members assign values to finds. Sometimes this is ignored, sometimes people are vocal about it.

If you’d like a general idea, use ebay completed search results and see how many are actually selling. Of those that sell, are they similar to yours? How about the sizing? Of that limited group, what’s the price range? $/€/£ 10-50? If that’s the case, assume your find is somewhere in the middle.

If you have more detailed questions about value and selling, take a look at this thread: Buying & Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems and Questions.

Is this a thing? Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Before you ask this question, search the thread. If you’re logged in to StyleForum, there is a link at the top that says “search this thread.” Click it and a search box opens. Your search should reveal a number of results and you can see each post. It’s more than likely that in the 85,000+ posts within this thread, your “thing” has been discussed.

If you are saying to yourself “I don’t have time to look everything up!,” then why do you think anyone else should do that work for you? Is our time any less valuable than yours?

Beyond searching the thread directly, you have other options. Google images will help narrow things down, completed ebay searches will give you an idea of desirability. Once most of the common haunts have been exhausted, bring your question back to the thread.

What are the best stores in my area? Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
To many, if not most, this question is akin to asking what color underwear someone’s wife is wearing. It’s pretty much off-limits, even if most stores are readily accessible online. The exception to this, I’ve found, is that people are more than happy to help via PMs. I’ve visited a number of different areas and once I mentioned it, people with whom I’d never had contact were sending me messages offering their spots, best times, offering to meet, etc.

I’m just trying to improve my wardrobe and want simple answers!
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Well, simple answers are often elusive. The best answer to this, again, is doing a bit of research. StyleForum is full of beginner material. Beyond that, there are any number of menswear blogs and tumblrs that offer visual ideas. In fact, there are threads that list these.

Your lifestyle, preferences, size, and budget are all unknowns. Without this information, any suggestions are just blind guesses.

Here are some general guidelines for CM:

1. Light blue shirts and grey trousers are safe.
2. Avoid black suits. They aren’t staple.
3. Make sure everything fits. Pants can be hemmed easily.
4. A jacket with pinstripes should have pants 99% of the time.
5. If you’re wearing a tie, you should probably wear a suit/odd jacket.
6. Especially if you’re new to “dressing up,” don’t try to add anything that “pops” and don’t try to “set yourself apart.”
7. If you have to dress up: grey/charcoal suit, light blue shirt, black shoes, navy tie. Make sure it all fits.
post #26577 of 51252
Quote:
Originally Posted by eazye View Post

And let's not forget that this is an elitist thread. Not in the sense of people's attitudes, but of the content that gets posted here. It's the best of the best, the cream of the crop, whether that be outdoor gear, classic menswear or streetwear and denim. Yea, you are free to post your shitty shoes and licensed Dior if that's what you're into, but don't be mad when you get called out on it, especially after people tried to point you in the right direction and in a nice manner I might add. Nobody want's to see that shit. Why? Because we've seen and passed on it 1000's of times in thrift stores.

 

Keep in mind too that great finds are all relative.  If I found Kiton (and I still haven't!) I would brag about that shit like I had found Gianni Versace's original handwritten art for his designs (or some other equally crazy rare find that would be exceedingly rare). But, others on this thread post Kiton on a regular basis. I have never found any.  I would want to shout it from the rooftops when I did. Some finds are more interesting because they are so cool or rare even though they aren't worth crap.   Other finds are incredible for the simple reason that they are rare and worth a shit ton of money (like Vicuna).   But, you have to remember it is about perspective and its all relative.  @capnwes is one of our star posters on here and he finds some amazing things.  But, he also includes pictures of Jos A. Bank ties among his finds.  Do you know why?  Because along with the rare grail items, he also finds things that are nice, well made, and he makes a living selling them.  So, @MIkesChevelle remember it is about bragging.  While some of us (including myself) post some finds that some posters wouldn't look at twice, remember its about perspective and learning, and style, and for many its about making money on these finds (although we have a specific thread about the issues of flipping these things).  

 

By the way, @Orgetorix's suggestion to check his signature and read his blog is excellent advice.  I still look at it occasionally and I promise you, no matter how long you do this or how much you learn, there is somebody on here that knows more about a specific subject than you do.  

post #26578 of 51252
Speaking of grails...



Also, these just happened to be on the men's shoe rack.

post #26579 of 51252
Here is another quote that is of interest. This one is from April of 2014.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erichmax 
What's wrong with Christian Dior?
Quote:
Originally Posted by HansderHund 

This will require a bit of reading, which I'm not terribly sure you enjoy.

I thought everyone else may be interested in it anyway.

As the French couturiers created boutique collections, they discovered that the easiest way to offset their mounting losses on couture was to sign up licensees, which provided a reliable money machine and a lifeline for their businesses. The father of fashion licensing was Christian Dior, who in 1948 signed up with Prestige, a New York hosiery company, which produced his Christian Dior nylon stockings. Dior rejected an initial offer of a flat $10,000 licensing fee and held out for a revenue stream - a sliding royalty based on a percentage of sales - which became the industry standard for such contracts in the future.

In fashion licensing, a designer collects a royalty payment - between about 3 percent and 8 percent of wholesale volume - from an outside manufacturer who produces and markets the merchandise. Licensing enabled designers to put their trademarks on handbags, jewelry, shoes, and bed sheets - as well as clothes - quickly and relatively painlessly. Millions of American women who would never see the inside of an exclusive Paris atelier nevertheless shared the allure of filling their closets with affordable designer merchandise that was blessed with a couture pedigree.

Long after Dior’s death in 1957, the house of Dior continued to milk its vaunted trademark, with more than two hundred licensees by the late 1980s, when royalties ran deep. “From 1983 to 1989 we had licenses that were getting 20 to 25 percent increases every year and we didn’t understand why,” said Marie Fornier, who worked at Dior at the time. “The system was so great; Asia was just opening and there wasn’t a lot of competition outside the traditional designer brands. So it was, why not more? We even licensed Dior slippers with Aris Isotoner.”

But “more” resulted in schlock instead of chic. Marc Bohan, Dior’s couturier for nearly thirty years, became more and more disgusted as the Dior label ceased to reflect all that was elegant and chic. Once in the late 1980s when Bohan was aghast upon seeing “all that horrible luggage with the Dior name on it!”

While Arnault could take pride in Dior’s popular fragrances such as Diorissimo and its chic Baby Dior infant’s wear, the Dior trademark nevertheless suffered from “inconsistency,” admitted Colombe Nicholas, who ran Dior’s U.S. division in the 1980s and signed up many of its licensees at the behest of Paris headquarters. Quality control became exceedingly difficult to maintain because the licensees were more interested in making money that genuflecting to the House of Dior.

For example, the licenses refused to make merchandise that complemented the fashions designed by Marc Bohan. According to Nicholas, Bohan’s “ready-to-wear [collections for Dior] never sold well in the U.S. because the clothes were all wrong - too expensive, too formal, too French-looking, and not lifestyle-driven. Marc would set styles; he would say, for example, that green was the color of the season and a half of the licensees would say ‘you can’t give away a green coat in America.’ So, they tended to ignore him, rightly or wrongly.”

But the licensees were driven to safeguard their profits by any means necessary. They were already on the hook to pay Dior guaranteed minimum royalty payments, regardless of sales or profit levels. So it was in their best interest to jack up sales - to cut corners on quality, to make a handbag in a vinyl-trimmed canvas, for example, so that the handbags could retail for a lower price, making them easier to unload to department stores. Most high-fashion designers barred their licensees from shipping their merchandise to discounters like Loehmann’s. But if nobody was watching - and the French fashion houses were lax when it came to monitoring - the licensees would surreptitiously ship merchandise to any stores they pleased.

In fashion licensing, Nicholas said, “It is very difficult to balance image and to make money. The challenge is standing up to the licensees, telling them that whatever limitations in price, there should be a certain quality level. But when you are sitting across from a licensee with whom you do $100 million of business, it is a difficult position to be in. They tell you, “ ‘You don’t know what you’re talking about.’”

The licensing boom saturated the world with designer merchandise that hardly lived up to its prestigious labels - polyester scarves and handbags stamped with brassy logos. Hurting the French mystique even further was the flood of illegal counterfeit T-shirts and handbags hawked on the streets of big cities like New York. By the late 1980s, American shoppers in particular had had their fill and were no longer fascinated by most French designer labels.
post #26580 of 51252
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhyme View Post

@Denton look at the bottom left corner of the size tag.EZ tags usually point out if it's a jacket or suit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelntrigger View Post

[/Spoiler]
Looks like an orphan. I would Kopp on cheap. But would you really wear dated suits?

Word. IIRC Zegna tags always have a drop listed even if no pants?

I liked the navy windowpane, looked pretty contemporary but as a suit.

Passed on both. Tough finding six EZs in my size and passing on all.
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