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Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope) - Page 628

post #9406 of 13859
I agree. My girl always comments that she doesn't want me to look prettier than her. Sometimes she just doesn't get my style.
post #9407 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by absolem View Post

There are decent Beats products, I don't hear a lot of people complaining about Beats breaking and a couple of their models beat similarly priced models on sound quality.

Build quality isn't just whether things fall apart, when you breath on them or not.
post #9408 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by il_colonnello View Post

My own assumption about the underlying reason for that is that women are still not comfortable with the idea of (straight) men putting as much thought, and effort, into how they dress, as women. Which might explain why they seem to be more critical of full-on goth ninja than, say, "rocker" or "athleisure" - because that style just looks more patently studied and intentional to them (even though in reality probably none of those looks is any more or less studied than the others).

Honestly women who are into fashion, especially blogger types opinion about what I wear carry less weigh than, what my dog thinks. If I want a genuine opinion on whether or not something looks good I will ask someone who knows me.
post #9409 of 13859

If you're not already good with women, God save you if you think your clothes are going to help at all.

post #9410 of 13859
Well it helps your self confidence somewhat
post #9411 of 13859
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by il_colonnello View Post

Clothes can be used as an expression of certain aspects of your personality, but I think what he means is that if your whole wardrobe burned down or got stolen and you were suddenly reduced to wearing nothing but non-descript jeans and T-shirts from Zara, you'd still be the same person - to your relations as well as to yourself.

Highly unlikely. Traumatic events tend to change people. So, no, you probably wouldn't be the same post-burning of clothing as pre.
post #9412 of 13859
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

This article and the ensuing discussion is funny but let's parse what you're supposed to get out of it (Fuumawisdom edition-tm):

  • Even women in fashion tend to apply relatively mainstream criterias about gender roles when it comes to dressing (or so they say). Cause they know the topic they'll have developped a style taxonomy and a list of precise exclusions.
  • Make no mistake, they see normal (badly dressed) dude and they're not into it either.
  • A certain surface coherence between how you present yourself (lifestyle) and how you dress is appreciated, no one likes a poseur even though authenticity is an absurd concept.
  • No one here gives a damn because we're clothing enthousiasts. With that being said people tend to react positively when you have passions and present them in a compelling way.
  • Girls I know have made a list of what I and other guys are not supposed to wear, even busy people tend to free time when it is to be spent bitching.
  • LAGuy dresses like an asian cowboy on a kid's scooter and his wive forgives him, he should def stop for some flowers today and maybe the day after.peepwall[1].gif
  • Nothing in that list makes much sense, you shouldn't trust people on the internutz

It's an adult scooter. Says so right in the box. Also, you see them all over San Francisco, and I even saw a bunch in Paris.

There is a thread on Purseforum that confirms pretty much what you said about women into fashion. I mean, not surprisingly, most people are pretty "hetero-normative". I.e. while you are flexing on basics, they are really flexing on you.

Cowboys are super masculine. So I win.
post #9413 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by wogbog View Post

any suggestions for a small satchel/purse for carrying my iphone/cardholder/ipod around in? summer means no coats and i dont like having things in my pants pockets. 200$ish price range and leather would be ideal

Fuck purses or manbags or whatever, just put stuff in your pockets.
post #9414 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post


It's an adult scooter. Says so right in the box. Also, you see them all over San Francisco, and I even saw a bunch in Paris.

There is a thread on Purseforum that confirms pretty much what you said about women into fashion. I mean, not surprisingly, most people are pretty "hetero-normative". I.e. while you are flexing on basics, they are really flexing on you.

Cowboys are super masculine. So I win.

These are not justifications.

 

BTW as a skater I'm obliged to rumble with you if we're rolling on the same side of the street.

post #9415 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by wogbog View Post

any suggestions for a small satchel/purse for carrying my iphone/cardholder/ipod around in? summer means no coats and i dont like having things in my pants pockets. 200$ish price range and leather would be ideal

I've been having this problem too, so I've been looking for strange shirts with enormous pockets. So I just bought this Document patch-pocket shirt:



Which is sort of awesome, but it's a little too heavy for summer daytime wear. And I've got a snowsmock, and I've been browsing the Kapital site cuz they have a dozen different cargo-pocket shirts. But I'm finding that really, just carrying a small bag like you're thinking may be more...reasonable. Or at least my girlfriend isn't gonna give me shit about yet another weird garment. Maybe my milsurp helmet bag is gonna get some use this summer, even though it's big as hell
post #9416 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

It's an adult scooter. Says so right in the box. Also, you see them all over San Francisco, and I even saw a bunch in Paris.

Want to see you race around on the SuitSupply scooter

http://us.suitsupply.com/en_US/campaign?c=racecase
post #9417 of 13859

Are there ISO or other sustainability certifications for fashion/design companies?  Reading on my lunch hour and came across the following paragraph.  It's in the context of Chinese economic consumption patterns but it's pretty sobering for the subset that frequents this board.  Makes me wonder if there's not a market niche for artisanal desingers that incorporate sustainability into all aspects of their business.

 

"The price collapse spurred the biggest boom in global consumption in history and this in turn accelerated global resource plunder on an unprecedented scale. The sudden availability of such a huge pool of ultra-cheap workers also spurred a minor industrial revolution enabling producers to annihilate most of the remaining categories of durable goods and replace them with cheaper, disposable replacements. With the disposables revolution, local tailors and alteration shops, shoe repair shops, appliance repair shops, TV repairmen and the like all but vanished in the West as it became cheaper to toss it and replace it than repair it. Take clothes: “Fast Fashion” (aka “Trashion Fashion”) from H&M, Target, Zara’s and others, now 5 Elizabeth Economy and Michael Levi, By All Means Necessary, Oxford 2014, chapters 3 & 4. 6 Craig Simons, The Devouring Dragon, New York, 2013, p. 9 and chapters 7&8. 7 Joseph Kahn and Mark Landler, “China grabs west’s smoke-spewing factories,” New York Times, 21 December 2007. William J. Kelly and Chip Jacobs, The People’s Republic of Chemicals (Los Angeles: Vireo 2014). 8 Alexandra Harney, The China Price, New York, 2008, pp. 8-9. real-world economics review, issue no. 71 subscribe for free 24 rules the women’s apparel market with clothes so cheap it’s often not worth the cost of drycleaning them. As Elizabeth Kline relates in her recent book Overdressed: the Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion “seasonal shopping patterns have given way to continuous consumption.” Zara delivers new lines twice a week to its stores. H&M and Forever 21 stock new styles every day. In Kline’s words: “Buying so much clothing and treating it as if it is disposable, is putting a huge added weight on the environment and is simply unsustainable.” To say the least. The U.S. cotton crop requires the application of 22 billion pounds of toxic pesticides every year. Most fiber is dyed or bleached, treated in toxic chemical baths to make it brighter, softer, more fade resistant, water proof, or less prone to wrinkles. Upholstery fabrics and children’s pyjamas are treated with ghastly chemicals to make them stain resistant or fireproof. These toxic baths consume immense quantities of chemicals and water and it goes without saying that in China, the chemicals are routinely just dumped in rivers and lakes, untreated, just like that silicon tetrachloride poured out on Li Guangxuan’s cornfield. Then after all the chemical treatments, the fabrics have to be dried under heat lamps. These processes consume enormous quantities of energy. The textile industry is one of the largest sources of GHG emissions in the world, and it’s growing exponentially. In 1950, when there were about 2.5 billion people on earth, they consumed around 10 million tons of fabric for all uses. Today, we are 7 billion, but we consume more than 70 million tons of fabric annually, nearly 3 times as much per person as we consumed in the fifties. Producing 70 million tons of fabric consumes astounding quantities of resources including more than 145 million tons of coal and between 1.5 and 2 trillion gallons of fresh water, every year. Synthetic fibers like polyester and such (now 60 percent of the market) are the worst: They consume between 10 and 25 times as much energy to produce as natural fibers. In short, “fast fashion” is speeding the disposal of planet Earth."

post #9418 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by il_colonnello View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by RegisDB9 View Post

I really want to go full trousers and no more denim (not that I have many anyways). The feel of virgin wool.....cant beat it

No doubt, totally with you on that. Unfortunately for some purposes it just isn't practical not to able to wash your trousers yourself.

The thought of having to dry clean is exactly what stopped me before. Then I thought wait I am spending all this time and money to pick out trousers I like why the fuck do they sit in my closet unused for fear of having to clean them? What the fuck have I been thinking haha
post #9419 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gruff View Post

Are there ISO or other sustainability certifications for fashion/design companies?  Reading on my lunch hour and came across the following paragraph.  It's in the context of Chinese economic consumption patterns but it's pretty sobering for the subset that frequents this board.  Makes me wonder if there's not a market niche for artisanal desingers that incorporate sustainability into all aspects of their business.

"The price collapse spurred the biggest boom in global consumption in history and this in turn accelerated global resource plunder on an unprecedented scale. The sudden availability of such a huge pool of ultra-cheap workers also spurred a minor industrial revolution enabling producers to annihilate most of the remaining categories of durable goods and replace them with cheaper, disposable replacements. With the disposables revolution, local tailors and alteration shops, shoe repair shops, appliance repair shops, TV repairmen and the like all but vanished in the West as it became cheaper to toss it and replace it than repair it. Take clothes: “Fast Fashion” (aka “Trashion Fashion”) from H&M, Target, Zara’s and others, now 5 Elizabeth Economy and Michael Levi, By All Means Necessary, Oxford 2014, chapters 3 & 4. 6 Craig Simons, The Devouring Dragon, New York, 2013, p. 9 and chapters 7&8. 7 Joseph Kahn and Mark Landler, “China grabs west’s smoke-spewing factories,” New York Times, 21 December 2007. William J. Kelly and Chip Jacobs, The People’s Republic of Chemicals (Los Angeles: Vireo 2014). 8 Alexandra Harney, The China Price, New York, 2008, pp. 8-9. real-world economics review, issue no. 71 subscribe for free 24 rules the women’s apparel market with clothes so cheap it’s often not worth the cost of drycleaning them. As Elizabeth Kline relates in her recent book Overdressed: the Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion “seasonal shopping patterns have given way to continuous consumption.” Zara delivers new lines twice a week to its stores. H&M and Forever 21 stock new styles every day. In Kline’s words: “Buying so much clothing and treating it as if it is disposable, is putting a huge added weight on the environment and is simply unsustainable.” To say the least. The U.S. cotton crop requires the application of 22 billion pounds of toxic pesticides every year. Most fiber is dyed or bleached, treated in toxic chemical baths to make it brighter, softer, more fade resistant, water proof, or less prone to wrinkles. Upholstery fabrics and children’s pyjamas are treated with ghastly chemicals to make them stain resistant or fireproof. These toxic baths consume immense quantities of chemicals and water and it goes without saying that in China, the chemicals are routinely just dumped in rivers and lakes, untreated, just like that silicon tetrachloride poured out on Li Guangxuan’s cornfield. Then after all the chemical treatments, the fabrics have to be dried under heat lamps. These processes consume enormous quantities of energy. The textile industry is one of the largest sources of GHG emissions in the world, and it’s growing exponentially. In 1950, when there were about 2.5 billion people on earth, they consumed around 10 million tons of fabric for all uses. Today, we are 7 billion, but we consume more than 70 million tons of fabric annually, nearly 3 times as much per person as we consumed in the fifties. Producing 70 million tons of fabric consumes astounding quantities of resources including more than 145 million tons of coal and between 1.5 and 2 trillion gallons of fresh water, every year. Synthetic fibers like polyester and such (now 60 percent of the market) are the worst: They consume between 10 and 25 times as much energy to produce as natural fibers. In short, “fast fashion” is speeding the disposal of planet Earth."

I vote to disband the forum.
post #9420 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by RegisDB9 View Post

The thought of having to dry clean is exactly what stopped me before. Then I thought wait I am spending all this time and money to pick out trousers I like why the fuck do they sit in my closet unused for fear of having to clean them? What the fuck have I been thinking haha

I don't think I've worn jeans in three weeks (only wool trousers) and tend to roll on the floor/get dirty and it isn't much of a problem.
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