or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope) - Page 591

post #8851 of 13795
Email styleforum.net[at]gmail so he can forward it to the minions. It happened to me again yesterday smile.gif
post #8852 of 13795
Happens to me every day.
post #8853 of 13795
The baggy early-to-mid-90s silhouette.


Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

The "I raided my obese grandfather's wardrobe and jazzed it up with a graphic T" look.
post #8854 of 13795
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hooker4186 View Post

Fok, just got one of those stupid mobile popups:



Had to click OK, took me here:
https://s3.amazonaws. com/mybenefit/fb/mobile/us/k001/a200.html?sid=STYLEFORUM.NET#b
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bussit View Post

Email styleforum.net[at]gmail so he can forward it to the minions. It happened to me again yesterday smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by zissou View Post

Happens to me every day.

Yeah, completely unacceptable.  If this persists, I'll call them and yell at them on the phone.

post #8855 of 13795
I have never seen a pop up ad on here, you guys must watch too much porn on your phones.
post #8856 of 13795
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

I have never seen a pop up ad on here, you guys must watch too much porn on your phones.

mM neither. and this is another (real) possibility, and not just from porn.  Nevertheless, it's been reported and I'm following up tomorrow.

post #8857 of 13795
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

The big long coat and volume trend must've reached its peak here in Sweden at this point.
It feels like every other female in 18-30 y.o. category has caught on, at least in the cities.

Standard fit:
- Oversize coat that reaches mid calf. Probably has a belt that is untied.
- Wide pants, either cropped or full break, preferably in black.
- Fun sneakers, most likely a pair of NB. Alternatively big white basketball kicks, like AF1's.

I don't dislike it.
It's just bizzare that is has become so popular since its such a distinctive look and silhouette that would have been considered just weird no less than 5 years ago, when the uniform across the board was tight black jeans, tight black bomber, boots. Especially the long oversize coat would have stuck out and to my memory the only people who wore AF1's were sneakerheads at that time. Guys have not really caught on here, and I doubt they will to the same extent as females.

It all just feels so short sighted and it will be interesting to see how long it takes until its out of fashion again.

i wanted to follow up on this and expand a bit on my post from last night.

it sounds like this look may be more prevalent in sweden than in nyc, but you definitely see it here a lot, too.

i empathize with being annoyed or bored by various fashion trends, especially when (1) your eye gets tired of seeing the same thing on lots of people, (2) it seems like a sizable chunk of those people have just copied whatever the "hot look" is, such that there is no interesting relationship between the person's interests/tastes/personality and what they've chosen to wear, beyond a desire to gain some kind of social capital.

like, i seeeeriously empathize. i tend to avoid walking around the fashionable districts here because i find the posturing and attention-seeking game pretty repulsive.

however, if we assume that (1) and (2) are constants, in the sense that they will be true of any fashion trend, then i think the oversized coat/baggy pants/chunky shoes is about as unobjectionable as it gets. unlike many other trends, it encourages people to play with shapes in interesting and often pleasing ways, and to wear clothing that is flowy and comfortable. so it's miles ahead of things like the recent north face fleece/uggs combo on american college girls, or the button-down shirt/skinny jean/clarks db combo on style-interested-but-please-tell-me-how-to-do-it guys.
post #8858 of 13795
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface View Post

i wanted to follow up on this and expand a bit on my post from last night. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
it sounds like this look may be more prevalent in sweden than in nyc, but you definitely see it here a lot, too.

i empathize with being annoyed or bored by various fashion trends, especially when (1) your eye gets tired of seeing the same thing on lots of people, (2) it seems like a sizable chunk of those people have just copied whatever the "hot look" is, such that there is no interesting relationship between the person's interests/tastes/personality and what they've chosen to wear, beyond a desire to gain some kind of social capital.

like, i seeeeriously empathize. i tend to avoid walking around the fashionable districts here because i find the posturing and attention-seeking game pretty repulsive.

however, if we assume that (1) and (2) are constants, in the sense that they will be true of any fashion trend, then i think the oversized coat/baggy pants/chunky shoes is about as unobjectionable as it gets. unlike many other trends, it encourages people to play with shapes in interesting and often pleasing ways, and to wear clothing that is flowy and comfortable. so it's miles ahead of things like the recent north face fleece/uggs combo on american college girls, or the button-down shirt/skinny jean/clarks db combo on style-interested-but-please-tell-me-how-to-do-it guy
s.

Mary Choi had an article a while ago back at Racked.com. It was ostensibly about the female equivalent of fuccbois (so, MA-1 bomber with overly-long sleeved sweaters and white Air Force 1s cause "you're bae AF"), but it was really about how people dress according to algorithms these days. Not sure if it's really more true of this era than any other, but her point was that people don't take fashion risks as much anymore -- they just want to look "correct" according to whatever subculture they identify with.

An excerpt:
Quote:
I have a vintage Byblos jacket that goes with nothing. It's black, cashmere, and double-breasted, with outsized shoulders and a tiny waist that ends several inches above my own. When I Marie Kondo'd my closet, I kept the Byblos because it passed the test: It sparked joy. It also represents a sartorial conundrum, a baffler that rarely exists for me anymore. I've learned it looks way too BDSM secretary with a pencil skirt. Tailored trousers edge it into zoot suit territory. It could work with a neon coral palazzo pant with vents up the front that reach mid-thigh, but I genuinely don't know if such a garment exists. I may have to get it made.

Fuccboiism is the opposite of the Byblos jacket. The Byblos jacket is the ASCII shrug of outwear. On the other end of the spectrum is this dressing to an algorithm, ascribing only to fashion tropes. I've long scoffed at the notion that the internet has the capacity to ruin anything: attention spans, music, meaningful relationships, manners. It seemed too hoary and click-bait alarmist for that to be true. But — and maybe this is proof that I've edged into my Eileen Fisher years — I'm starting to think it has ruined style. It might have even preemptively ruined Eileen Fisher for me, because at my age it's slightly premature and I'm already tired of that being a thing.

Don't get me wrong. I enjoy a microtrend as much as anyone: urban woodsman, health-goth, normcore, athleisure, vaporwave, soft-grunge. I love fashion taxonomy. I adore the ontological aspects of Internet style; the ever-expanding Dewey Decimal System of it all is a delight. Mostly because it's utter nonsense and the rules are largely made up by four to eight Twitter accounts that gleefully confuse the caps lock key with authority. It's a shit-show, and it's great.

But now there are too many correct outfits, too many starter kits. Trying to find an image of a wide-brim hat without feathered bangs and a shearling-trimmed patchwork duster or a see-through caftan is like searching for fat Karl Lagerfeld photos: impossible. When you Google Image search an article of clothing, a shoe, or a brand, you have the option of seeing its most desirable SEO rankings — say, as part of an outfit, or as worn by a celebrity, or as a manifestation of some particularly sticky "street style."

It's how flat-front gauchos beg for a stacked-heel mule and a crossbody bag with a very thin strap. Or bigger culottes in fluffier materials go with shrunken varsity jackets or else really, really big varsity jackets. All with ball caps. But, please don't bend the brim! Everyone dresses artfully off-kilter, like off-duty models, from trainers with delicate, bias-cut silk dresses to mismatched earrings that indicate you have a sense of humor.

It's the sartorial equivalent of the IKEA scene in "Fight Club," the one that signals just how wrong everything has gone in Ed Norton's life. "If I saw something clever like a little coffee table shaped like a yin-yang I had to have it," he narrates. "I'd flip through catalogues and think what kind of dining set defines me as a person ... I had it all, even the glassware with tiny bubbles and imperfections."

It's the hyper-curation that I find onerous. The practiced élan. So what are we calling this? Fuck it, let's just be gender-fluid and inclusive, as our best selves are, and call all of it fuccboiism. Maybe selfies are to blame. Or maybe it's the overexposure of famous people who take zero fashion risks. Or the sheer number of collections that designers have to show every year.

Whatever it is, I miss fashion risks. Faux-pas that, through humor and nerve, stick the landing. I thought it was that I was getting old. You know, that point at which you stop listening to contemporary music or think every room has a draft. But then again maybe it's not. Old people are dressing their asses off.

She kind of expanded on this recently on HighSnobiety's podcast. It's really more about attitude, I think, than how you look (at least in some ways). She's OK, for example, with people wearing the Vetements DHL tee as a kind of wink and a nod to an inside fashion joke. Or putting something on ice and wearing it just when it's going out of style, just to have a laugh.

http://www.highsnobiety.com/2016/03/24/where-did-the-word-fuccboi-come-from/

Anyway, it kind of feels like Fok's issue is really about that lack of fashion risk. The big coat + cropped pants thing is slightly more interesting than the slim jeans + OCBD + Clarks DB uniform of every office worker, but it's still that kind of dress by algorithm, "I need to look" correct spirit -- albeit according to different social circles. I just think this is true of everything though, not that Paris FashionDude look. It's true for everything from Nigel Cabourn to Rick Owens.

Obviously, the stuff that's really interesting (and exhibits real personal style) is when people dress according to things they just like and don't look like a blog post, but that takes a lot of experimentation and willingness to try things out. Which can be hard (as well as super expensive) if you're shopping online since you can't just see how a jacket looks on you when you try it on -- you have to shop according to preconceived notions that you probably formed from blogs, IG accounts, and people you've seen on the street.

Stuff I've been really impressed with: Parker mixing Vass and WW Chan with Yohiji Yamamoto, Greg choosing stuff for his store that doesn't feel like trend chasing (or trying to sell you a total pre-packaged, all encompassing look), nicelynice wearing gothy stuff over some Seahawks jersey, penanceroyaltea doing a not-overly-serious Japanese workwear look, etc. All of those people seem to be having fun with their clothes, which is what makes seeing what they're wearing enjoyable.

Stuff that I find annoying: SLP guys waving their purchases around trying to show off how expensive it is, taking lookbooks too literally (like a total pre-packaged thing), bashing guys for buying April 77 (or similar brands that are more affordable), doing Kanye cos-play, wearing a vintage-inspired look even though they prob think actual vintage is "too icky," being snobby assholes, basically being the equivalent of some shitty person with a ton of Gucci logos on their clothes and feeling like they're better than other people because they have some expensive item.

So, while we can't all reach Parker, Greg, nicelynice, etc levels of nirvana, I'll take guys having genuine fun in Lemaire over SLP stuff. We're all dressing by algorithm these days, but the attitude underneath is means a lot to me. So long as someone is having fun in that baggy coat and cropped pants, and not being an asshole while looking at others, I say more power to him.

Only thing that bothers me about that baggy coat + cropped pants look is that sometimes I get the sense the wearer has that kind of "I'm cooler than everyone else" attitude that makes SLP fans annoying -- even though those things are basically FashionDude starter packs at this point that anyone can buy over the internet. But maybe that's just because of all the moody colors and fashion dudes not smiling in photos.
post #8859 of 13795
At the risk of sounding defensive since I obviously love Lemaire (and big coats, cropped pants too), but I guess I don't see the Lemaire influence other than the oversized coat. Cropped pants are rare in his looks (I don't even remember seeing them used actually) and his footwear is always sleek.
I think the big coat stems from being "put together" with minimal effort. You put a big coat over a tee and sweats and you look decent cos everything else is hidden. Obviously if everybody is wearing it then the copycat aspect is real but there are some people who have been doing it and are getting "caught" in the trend. I can definitely see the view that it's a boring look now, but at the same time if that your lane and suddenly other people are doing it, do you have to be the one to find a new lane or do you wait for it to blow over? Like the all EG + workwear clan, a few years ago that was a "trend", but there's still people doing it (really well) now, after its passed because that's what they identify with. Like Fok's all indigo everything + vis would have easily fit into a trend during the raw denim days, but he still does it now and was doing it before then. So did you feel awkward as fuck when everybody else was dressing like you (in a sense) Fok?
post #8860 of 13795
Solid posts and I agree on many points.

My post wasn't as much about this look in itself as it was about the short sightedness of mainstream/popular fashion in general. How I dress some days is actually not that far off from this particular look.
post #8861 of 13795
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

At the risk of sounding defensive since I obviously love Lemaire (and big coats, cropped pants too), but I guess I don't see the Lemaire influence other than the oversized coat.

yeah, this reference puzzled me at first, too. i think in our small corner of the fashion community, lemaire's relaxed/slightly oversized looks may stand in for the larger trend.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Mary Choi had an article a while ago back at Racked.com. It was ostensibly about the female equivalent of fuccbois (so, MA-1 bomber with overly-long sleeved sweaters and white Air Force 1s cause "you're bae AF"), but it was really about how people dress according to algorithms these days. Not sure if it's really more true of this era than any other, but her point was that people don't take fashion risks as much anymore -- they just want to look "correct" according to whatever subculture they identify with.

yeah, i agree that dressing according to algorithms is something that's always been around, and for good reason (even just to have some associations in your head about which things tend to go well with which other things, plus the subcultural-association stuff you mentioned). i'm not sure why choi claims that there is less risk-taking now-- i see an incredible variety of looks on a daily basis, including lots of weird stuff. if anything, i'd guess that there's more experimentation now.

but here's an hypothesis: the more time you spend looking at fashion stuff, especially online, the easier it is for you to see the "roots" of a given look-- to understand what it's referencing, even if the wearer might not-- and so the harder it is for you to be surprised by the clothing or styling choice someone has made. this would lead you to conclude that there is less risk-taking, when instead you're just more knowledgeable about what's going on.

Quote:
Anyway, it kind of feels like Fok's issue is really about that lack of fashion risk.

fok and i have disagreed about this stuff before, but i suspect he sometimes likes dissonance for the sake of dissonance. i like weirdness and surprise, too, but it's relatively lower on the list of things i care about when it comes to styling.
Quote:
...the attitude underneath means a lot to me. So long as someone is having fun in that baggy coat and cropped pants, and not being an asshole while looking at others, I say more power to him.

totally agree. i should have specified that this one of the main things that bugs me about walking around soho or wherever: there's often less a sense of fun, ease, or humor as people go about their days wearing their cool clothes, and more a sense of self-serious exhibitionism.

but, to tie this back to my previous post, my hope is that once people wear their loose pants, and their droopy-shouldered coat, they'll be like, "hey, this feels nice. i'm having a better time than before!"
post #8862 of 13795

I can't see how big coat/cropped trousers is on the same level as skinny jeans/Stans or OBCD/CPs/Clarks DBs or even full Rick. The first set is much better if only because that stuff (for men at least) isn't nearly as easy to find or as coveted, and no blogs/forums are recommending Kaftans or vintage oversized coats as part of a starter pack.

 

Regarding the article

 

- Dressing by algorithm is a necessary step for anyone learning to dress.

 

- Chasing trends is more of a social activity than aesthetic. Unknown designers don't provide cultural capital to the people in those kinds of circles. Likewise, different people relate differently to art. For example not everyone associate the music they listen to with what kind of person they are, or treat it as a reflection of their aesthetic taste. Sometimes it's about listening to what everyone else is listening to, or finding the next whatever before they blow up.

 

- Accusing others of dressing too conservatively is, imo, rarely a fair criticism, but I agree that it makes sense in the case of youth and street fashion that are supposed to be progressive. Blame the celebrities and whoever the arbiters are I guess. Edit: And blame vetements, who are committing fashion incest.

 

- People who are not very particular about fashion or don't have significant experience or are not geniuses or did not have aesthetic upbringings don't just magically acquire distinct and good taste. I wouldn't even agree that it's more admirable to achieve some post-fashion, post-trend enlightenment as opposed to always staying in the game. It's harder not to become jaded and cynical.

 

- Are we post-health-goth now? Cuz I think that's what I've been doing for a while, mostly so I don't have to carry a full set of gym clothes with me everywhere.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface View Post

but here's an hypothesis: the more time you spend looking at fashion stuff, especially online, the easier it is for you to see the "roots" of a given look-- to understand what it's referencing, even if the wearer might not-- and so the harder it is for you to be surprised by the clothing or styling choice someone has made. this would lead you to conclude that there is less risk-taking, when instead you're just more knowledgeable about what's going on.

 

This is true. And also, to be pragmatic, it's much harder to put together incongruent stuff and come out looking good than copying what you see. People outside of the game "experiment" all the time by not caring about how they look. 


Edited by accordion - 4/3/16 at 5:23pm
post #8863 of 13795
I'm generally in the ghostface camp here, and i also agree that oversized coats + trousers just looks great, regardless of the current cycle.

However, I think there is a genuine concern with streetwear streatwear missing out on the influence it used to hold. That used to be such a huge pool for designers to pick up on, and now we risk two way incest in the way that designer wear is trickled down to streetwear as opposed to having that base of creativity that was the biggest influence on, say, early Rick.
post #8864 of 13795

Anyone hear about the Panama Papers yet?

 

http://panamapapers.sueddeutsche.de/articles/56febff0a1bb8d3c3495adf4/

 

This is going to be quite interesting.

post #8865 of 13795
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bussit View Post

Anyone hear about the Panama Papers yet?

http://panamapapers.sueddeutsche.de/articles/56febff0a1bb8d3c3495adf4/

This is going to be quite interesting.

Apparently lots of US specific news of the same coming soon
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope)