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Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope) - Page 494

post #7396 of 13825
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post

Who's the LAD musician version of Regis? Really liking that bomber a few people picked up, but not finding many stockists

you gotta look in japan for that designer.
post #7397 of 13825
Well, not quite. I can look on the Internet, too. They have their own web shop, for example. There may be other options too.
post #7398 of 13825
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicelynice View Post

y'all arguing about peyton's boring beer choice when this happened during the postgame show

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2614853-aqib-talib-wipes-out-on-his-way-to-postgame-interview-after-winning-super-bowl

@Mr. Moo, check that out AHAHAHAHAHA

also here is Eli's reaction to peyton winning
https://vine.co/v/i1vzPTulQ0L
post #7399 of 13825
Thread Starter 
In real fashion news, Tom Ford has taken Burberry's lead and broken ranks and will now show their shows in season, with the clothes available to the public nearly immediately afterwards.

I need to say.... "I told you so!" I've been arguing for years now that there is simply too much opportunity time lost between the fashion shows and when the clothes are produced, shipped, and hit the racks. I think that for designers that can't afford to do what a Tom Ford or a Burberry can do, it will mean more things like preorders, something a lot of designers, under pressure from traditional, stuck in the mud, afraid of technology, retailers, have been reluctant to embrace. Actually, I know this for a fact. Also, it will mean increasing relevance for online publications like ours, bloggers, social media, and decreased relevance for long lead press.

It's been a long time coming. A lot of the reactions against this have been, frankly, pretty weak. "There is a benefit to waiting", seems pretty lame to me.

We'll see where this leads, but there will be increasing pressure for fashion, which is notorious for trying to slow down technology by using coercion, (aka we won't let you in unless you agree to X,Y, and Z unrealistic conditions", to actually move in a way that is good for the end customer and those of us who can serve them in the way they want to be served.
post #7400 of 13825
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post

Who's the LAD musician version of Regis? Really liking that bomber a few people picked up, but not finding many stockists

@fishbones 

post #7401 of 13825
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I think that for designers that can't afford to do what a Tom Ford or a Burberry can do, it will mean more things like preorders, something a lot of designers, under pressure from traditional, stuck in the mud, afraid of technology, retailers, have been reluctant to embrace. Actually, I know this for a fact. 

 

Preordering is just a great way to buy shit. Reduces risk for both sides.

post #7402 of 13825
What risk does it reduce for the consumer?
post #7403 of 13825
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patagonianwild View Post

 

Preordering is just a great way to buy shit. Reduces risk for both sides.

Preordering actually decreases risks for both the designer and the retailer, and in doing so, increases the choices presented to customers.  Don't know if that awesome boot will sell, and don't want to sink $20K into stocking it on a gamble? Preorders will tell you if you should stock it during the regular season, and will allow those customers who want unusual pieces to get them.  Somethng like 50% of collections on average never get made because no retailer wants to take a gamble on the more esoteric pieces.

 

But a lot of traditional retailers NOT associated with platforms like Styleforum (we allow advertisers to reach a broad and enthusiastic audience, and we amplify that with our own efforts) have gone so far as to ask designers to not work with us or with our affiliates, citing that "It's not fair".  Which is the most stupid argument of all time, and is really, if we start to talk in that language, not fair to either us, our affiliates, or the consumers.  It's not an unfair competitive advantage.  It's a competitive advantage that we, our members - aka you guys, our affiliates, and everyone involved in this thing built, brick by brick, over the course of the last 13+ years.  

 

I suppose that they can play reactionary politics and hold designers hostage with $$$, but when the big brands start to break ranks, and start doing things like six collections a year, staging their runway shows, which are much more of a marketing tool to consumers these days than something to be shown to the self-appointed fashion elite, it's only a matter of time before that rotten house starts crumbling down.

post #7404 of 13825
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoreman1782 View Post

What risk does it reduce for the consumer?

It doesn't decrease any financial risk, since the consumer never really had any, but it increases efficiency by taking away third party decision making bias.  \\lot of the stuff that you see in the showrooms, the runway shows, simply never gets made.  The current fashion schedule is costly and inefficient, if for that reason alone.  Having preorders takes away much of that inefficiency.  A retailer can simply say to their customer "Hey, we think that this is really cool, but 1) we can't buy everything, 2) frankly, this piece might be tough to move through the store.  Hey global audience, do we have 20 people who want it and will pay for it, right now.  It will ensure that the piece gets made, and that you get it."

 

If designers knew that they did not have survive the gauntlet of buyers saying things like "Oh, i love it, but it would never sell", it would also free them up to be more creative.

post #7405 of 13825
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post


But a lot of traditional retailers NOT associated with platforms like Styleforum (we allow advertisers to reach a broad and enthusiastic audience, and we amplify that with our own efforts) have gone so far as to ask designers to not work with us or with our affiliates, citing that "It's not fair".  

This is sad, but doesn't surprise me at all.
post #7406 of 13825
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoreman1782 View Post

What risk does it reduce for the consumer?

Preorders typically can't be returned, so financially speaking it seems like it increases the risk to the consumer.

I suppose it decreases the risk of not getting what you want, which is a more grievous problem around these parts.
post #7407 of 13825
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoreman1782 View Post

What risk does it reduce for the consumer?


I was mostly referring to the risk of not getting what you want because of a discrepancy between demand and supply

post #7408 of 13825

A bit dense here, but how are stores going to make their buying/stocking decisions if items are to go on sale directly after the runway showing? Is there a preview period beforehand where stores make their decisions and then everybody else sees it on their runway? I feel like I'm missing a big piece of knowledge here...my current thought is that runway shows give buyers an opportunity to make deicisions on what they will carry

post #7409 of 13825
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

It doesn't decrease any financial risk, since the consumer never really had any, but it increases efficiency by taking away third party decision making bias.  \\lot of the stuff that you see in the showrooms, the runway shows, simply never gets made.  The current fashion schedule is costly and inefficient, if for that reason alone.  Having preorders takes away much of that inefficiency.  A retailer can simply say to their customer "Hey, we think that this is really cool, but 1) we can't buy everything, 2) frankly, this piece might be tough to move through the store.  Hey global audience, do we have 20 people who want it and will pay for it, right now.  It will ensure that the piece gets made, and that you get it."

If designers knew that they did not have survive the gauntlet of buyers saying things like "Oh, i love it, but it would never sell", it would also free them up to be more creative.

Do you think this is more a product of western retail pricing or simply because of lack of perceived demand? If the latter, do you think designers would take more risks on the more difficult pieces if the US had a retail model closer to Japan's? Though I realize Japanese brands have a much smaller size run, so I don't know how viable it'd be to scale to meet US demand.
post #7410 of 13825
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

In real fashion news, Tom Ford has taken Burberry's lead and broken ranks and will now show their shows in season, with the clothes available to the public nearly immediately afterwards. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

I need to say.... "I told you so!" I've been arguing for years now that there is simply too much opportunity time lost between the fashion shows and when the clothes are produced, shipped, and hit the racks. I think that for designers that can't afford to do what a Tom Ford or a Burberry can do, it will mean more things like preorders, something a lot of designers, under pressure from traditional, stuck in the mud, afraid of technology, retailers, have been reluctant to embrace. Actually, I know this for a fact. Also, it will mean increasing relevance for online publications like ours, bloggers, social media, and decreased relevance for long lead press.

It's been a long time coming. A lot of the reactions against this have been, frankly, pretty weak. "There is a benefit to waiting", seems pretty lame to me.

We'll see where this leads, but there will be increasing pressure for fashion, which is notorious for trying to slow down technology by using coercion, (aka we won't let you in unless you agree to X,Y, and Z unrealistic conditions", to actually move in a way that is good for the end customer and those of us who can serve them in the way they want to be served.

All this seems like it could end up being a fast fashion cycle on the high-end of the market though, leading to more impulsive purchases, faster trends, greater demand to keep up, etc.

I suppose it could also mean less work for fashion designers, who now don't have the pressure of doing make-it-or-break-it fashion collections two or three times a year, but they could still be designing just as large collections once you account for everything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by troika View Post

A bit dense here, but how are stores going to make their buying/stocking decisions if items are to go on sale directly after the runway showing? Is there a preview period beforehand where stores make their decisions and then everybody else sees it on their runway? I feel like I'm missing a big piece of knowledge here...my current thought is that runway shows give buyers an opportunity to make deicisions on what they will carry

AFAIK, at the moment, it's mainly done by brands who have their own stores. So it might affect how Mr. Porter interacts with Tom Ford, but I assume a lot of TF stuff is sold directly out of TF shops.
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