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Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope) - Page 490

post #7336 of 13920
I've become fashion complacent. I just grab whatever Schneider items catch my eye. I used to check the runways every season now I only do if someone on SF recommends it (like the Tim coppens collection)
post #7337 of 13920
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post


It's sounds silly, but it's probably not that far off the mark. Collection is not where the money is made. A lot more goes into the cost than design, materials and make. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Look at where Saint Laurent Paris boutiques are located - in San Francisco it is right on Union Square, probably the most expensive locations in the city, just for rent. I would be surprised if that space was not at least $10-20K a day, in rent alone.  And that is repeated in the most expensive countries in the world, across the world.  Then you pay for sales assistants, the ever changing installation, and all the overhead of running a retail space. That's not to mention the money spent on marketing, in all of its myriad forms. Collection pieces are rarely high margin pieces. Denim and sneakers and other entry level items is where the money is made, which is why pretty much every brand of size has denim, even though denim may not be core to the DNA of the brand. And of course, accessories and fragrances.  How many of those shirts do you think SLP would have to sell to keep the lights on, no profit.


That said, Saint Laurent Paris is not some small designer brand like a Stephan Schneider or a Norewegian Rain or SNS Herning or whatever that is possibly making the designer and their staff a decent, if not extravagant, living, It's a brand owned by Kering, and I would bet my bottom dollar that Kering is trying to maximize on their investment as much as possible.


fwiw, retail is a very low margin business. In the signal digits. This is why things like decreasing returns rates, increasing the sell through rate at retail and at the lower markdowns, lowering shrinkage *aka theft - a significant problem in retail, managing all costs, are all very important.  That's why Amazon is paying big dollars for shoe sizing technology to try to decrease the return rates for Zappos.

All those things you mentioned though are part of why SLP is so awful -- the taking of vintage/ rocker/ grunge styles and turning them into this exclusive, luxury look for the class anxious. The fancy showrooms, expensive locations, marketing campaigns, etc. All for marketing stuff that you can find in a vintage shop or Hot Topic. I'm sure they could make that shirt sell for less than $700 (there are a ton of luxury brands with much better made items on Union Square, and they don't even sell shirts for $700), but that's not the point. It sells for that amount because SLP is based on exclusivity and hype. That's part of the gross appeal.
post #7338 of 13920
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

All those things you mentioned though are part of why SLP is so awful -- the taking of vintage/ rocker/ grunge styles and turning them into this exclusive, luxury look for the class anxious. The fancy showrooms, expensive locations, marketing campaigns, etc. All for marketing stuff that you can find in a vintage shop or Hot Topic. I'm sure they could make that shirt sell for less than $700 (there are a ton of luxury brands with much better made items on Union Square, and they don't even sell shirts for $700), but that's not the point. It sells for that amount because SLP is based on exclusivity and hype. That's part of the gross appeal.

Partially agree, which is why I wrote this:

That said, Saint Laurent Paris is not some small designer brand like a Stephan Schneider or a Norewegian Rain or SNS Herning or whatever that is possibly making the designer and their staff a decent, if not extravagant, living, It's a brand owned by Kering, and I would bet my bottom dollar that Kering is trying to maximize on their investment as much as possible.

They charge that price in part because that price is sustainable for them AND sells the product. Fashion week s one sector where you can be more attractive by charging more.
post #7339 of 13920
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike868y View Post

are there any online DIY tutorials for "sashiko" stitching?


I dunno, I took it to the old ladies at the sewing store who charged me $10 haha
post #7340 of 13920

Came across this old interview with a model turned sociologist, some pretty interesting answers:

 

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/21/a-model-professor/?_r=0

 

Quote:

There’s one point in the book when you quote a booking agent who attributes the prevailing aesthetic of editorial models — skinny, tall, often unfeminine — to the undue influence that gay men have over the fashion industry. Do you think there’s anything to this?

 

At the editorial end of the modeling industry, it is a pretty insular and closed-off world. It is a world in which there’s a higher proportion of gay men — and women — than in other fields of work. I don’t think, however, there’s a straight causal arrow that you can draw from that — that gay men will choose a model that looks a certain way necessarily. That was one theory put forth by a booker.

 

But why is there this perceived disconnect between traditional beauty and the type of look that is coveted on the runway?

 

If you walk into an agency, you see the models’ cards along the wall. They’re often divided into these different boards, sometimes not obviously. But most agents will be able to see what’s the editorial end and what’s the commercial end. The commercial end are models that bring in the bread-and-butter income of an agency: the catalog stuff, the fittings, the trunk shows at the mall. The kinds of jobs that are intended to sell things, to move merchandise. They have to resonate with a mass audience. The editorial end is the elite end, it’s by far the more prestigious end, it’s where a fashion agency gets all of its symbolic status or cultural prestige. They don’t make nearly as much money unless they get picked up to do a mega-campaign, like a Kate Moss for instance. And they look really strange. They don’t resonate with a mass audience, and that’s the point. They’re not intended to. That’s kind of a general principle that we take from the art world. The more people a specific piece of art is intended to make sense to, the less valuable on the whole it is. Something that resonates with high prestige, elite insiders, the Anna Wintours of the universe — it’s like a wink and a nod to their own competencies just to get it.

 

[...]

 

But a lot of that — the curvy models — that’s more the result of tokenism, right? It’s distinct from a kind of shift in the baseline preference, which is for extraordinarily thin and tall white women.

 

Right. The baseline never changes.

 

So why is that?

I argue it’s class. The distinction between editorial and commercial fashion ultimately is a class distinction. If you look at a historical trajectory of what, in Western society, elite culture values, it’s this prized aesthetic for women with extremely thin, taut, controlled bodies. A corpulent body, a body with rolls and with flesh, is a body that signals looseness, sexual availability, and is antithetical to a kind of “elite” body. You can see this in strip clubs as well. There’s some ethnographic work that shows that strip clubs that cater to higher-class audiences have thinner women, and whiter women. You see it reproduce in all kinds of different settings. The ways that things change are a bit harder to explain. Why curves or why Asian or why blue eyes this season and not the next?

post #7341 of 13920
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike868y View Post

are there any online DIY tutorials for "sashiko" stitching?

You have to make a distinction.  The material that we call "sashiko" is the material that was used in Edo era Firemen's uniforms and these days in Brazilian Jiujitsu gis.  Super durable.  The "heavy sashiko" is serious business.  It's a very thick reinforcement thread on a modern canvas (which is much more dense than a traditional homespun), and it is designed to withstand years of strong, powerful men throwing each other around and trying to choke the other dude or break a joint using it as leverage.  However, the sashiko technique is just a running stitch.  It's the easiest stitch that you can make in embroidery.  It's the first stitch that my older daughter (now 8) started learning when she was 6.  And anyone who knows 6 year olds know that they don't have the fine motor skills of an adult.  I have a couple of scarves (or rather, I have one scarf, and my wife commandeered the other) Stevenson Overall scarves that have lines and lines of sashiko stitching.  Truly beautiful, and I wear mine for that "western x eastern" look, with like, my Type III jackets and some Visvim, but it's not the same durable stuff that Blue Blue Japan, or Fuji gis (shoutout for my favorite company) or @nicelynice used.

post #7342 of 13920
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Fashion week s one sector where you can be more attractive by charging more.

so true i stopped buying midrange designers because they are too affordable for regular people. only rick owens now though if his clothes keep on having great sales i will need to go to CCP or something.
post #7343 of 13920
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by accordion View Post
 

Came across this old interview with a model turned sociologist, some pretty interesting answers:

 

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/21/a-model-professor/?_r=0

 

I'm such a mass audience/populist as such things go.

post #7344 of 13920
Quote:
Originally Posted by ppllzz View Post


so true i stopped buying midrange designers because they are too affordable for regular people. only rick owens now though if his clothes keep on having great sales i will need to go to CCP or something.

Have you considered SLP? 

post #7345 of 13920
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragechester View Post
 

Have you considered SLP? 

Balenciaga.  

 

Though I actually like a fair bit of Balenciaga stuff, so...

carry on.

post #7346 of 13920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragechester View Post

Have you considered SLP? 

couple pairs of jeans, might get the flannels and a leather
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Balenciaga.  

Though I actually like a fair bit of Balenciaga stuff, so...
carry on.

i have arenas and will probably get the race runners
post #7347 of 13920

Have you considered that @GoldenTribe may have just used your quote you without crediting you? 

post #7348 of 13920
On groiled, dude is selling a "complete" set of SLP flannel shirts for 10k. Paul Ryan Gosling's stylist will probably buy them.
post #7349 of 13920
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post

On groiled, dude is selling a "complete" set of SLP flannel shirts for 10k. Paul Ryan Gosling's stylist will probably buy them.

Paging @Bam!ChairDance
post #7350 of 13920
Quote:
Originally Posted by accordion View Post
 

The more people a specific piece of art is intended to make sense to, the less valuable on the whole it is.

 

 

This is a terrible analogy and argument. It's patently false

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