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Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope) - Page 331

post #4951 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by basil rathbone View Post

Dunno what Chicago is like, but the cold in the PNW is bone-chilling. It's so wet. -5C on the coast feels like -15C in the prairies.

wut. this is not my experience at all. living here has made me allergic to real cold and heat because we have neither. at any rate cheers PNW brother.
post #4952 of 13859
I don't think I've ever been in anything below 25 and that was in the mountains.
post #4953 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

I'll make sure to bring warmer clothes, -10 is a lot harsher than 0.

Not necessarily, if the weather is dry and -10, it's much nicer than 0 and wet.
post #4954 of 13859
I hail from the tropics and gonna be travelin to japan this coming feb... gonna be my first winter. quite excited but also wary after following this convo lol
post #4955 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post


Not necessarily, if the weather is dry and -10, it's much nicer than 0 and wet.

Bicycling around 0 when it's wet and windy is the worst. It's terrible.

 

Also, are there any other options for decent black lace-up boots as Dr. Martens around the same budget? It seems like most alternatives are poor quality/design.

post #4956 of 13859

Someone purchased an item I had on eBay for around $700. Is there any precaution I can take to avoid being ripped off? I've heard these horror stories about buyers claiming they never received the item and eBay/PayPal refusing to accept proof of delivery.

post #4957 of 13859
take pictures and have signature confirmation.
post #4958 of 13859

If you insure the package for over 200 then the recipient has to sign for it as well (at least that's for USPS).

post #4959 of 13859
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post


Not necessarily, if the weather is dry and -10, it's much nicer than 0 and wet.

This.  The dampness is a stone cold killer.  If it's damp and windy, fuggedaboutit.  Your favorite color suddently becomes "warm".

post #4960 of 13859

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/its-raining-menswear

 

Quote:
There wasn’t, unfortunately, a clandestine colloquium, but there was “menswear,” a conversation that began online, in the early aughts, largely on Internet forums devoted to men’s fashion. Each forum catered to a slightly different kind of man. On Ask Andy About Clothes, old prepsters—“trads”—talked about sack suits; on Superfuture, kids who wanted to look like Tetsuo, from “Akira,” compared the fades on their Japanese denim. Users on Styleforum obsessed over heritage and craft, discussing labels like Incotex, Brioni, Filson, and Schott, while StyleZeitgeist was more avant-garde, with an emphasis on Rick Owens.
 
In those heady days, debates raged over fundamental questions: whether black suits are ever appropriate at non-funeral events (they’re not), whether stocky guys can pull off the “goth ninja” look (undecided), and whether jeans should “stack” at the hem or get cuffed (I prefer stacks). All of the “fora” had online marketplaces where men from around the world bought and sold clothes, and, slowly, a consensus emerged about the “grail” items each kind of man must own: Alden cordovan wingtips to go with your multipocked Engineered Garments “Bedford” blazer; flannel shirts from the Japanese brand Flat Head to wear with your Iron Heart or Sugar Cane denim; ties from Drake’s, sport coats from Isaia; a Rick Owens “Exploder” jacket paired with boots from Guidi. Back then, menswear was slightly underground. You would recognize fellow travellers on the street, but not often.
 
Around 2010, however, a number of factors combined to make menswear suddenly mainstream. More men started writing menswear blogs, while Tumblr created a menswear tag—“#menswear”—which allowed fashionable people who had missed out on menswear culture to discover it. At the same time, big fashion retailers began selling menswear style. Most prominently, J. Crew began to feature “grail” items in its stores, as part of a program it called “In Good Company.” (Nick Paumgarten’s 2010 profile of the company’s C.E.O., Mickey Drexler, finds him in Maine, sourcing moccasins from Quoddy.) One by one, the strands of men’s fashion emphasized by menswear—heritage Americana, denim fetishism, Ivy League traditionalism, Italian style, with its “sprezzatura,” or relaxed, studied flair—became popularized. Even the “goth ninja” look has achieved some currency, thanks to Kanye, who has made it his own. Today, on any given city block, you’ll see a man whose outfit contains a hint of menswear: a Filson bag; a narrow, high trouser hem; suede shoes with colored laces; a trim blazer in Italian azure; a waxed jacket or indigo shirt with an ironically large number of pockets. You’ll also see men who are desperate to keep their edge; they’re “dressed by the internet,” in crowded ensembles that are designed to be reblogged.
post #4961 of 13859
We illuminati now.
post #4962 of 13859
Quote:

 

Worth reading if only for the Antonio Banderas intro.

 

Quote:

"Banderas explained that he wanted to start his own menswear line; his particular ambition was to bring back the cape."

 

 

WTF?! 

post #4963 of 13859
Cam'ron beat him to it.

PS I saw 2 women casually drop 5k+ on capes at Saint Laurent yesterday. Shrug.
post #4964 of 13859
Quote:
Originally Posted by basil rathbone View Post

Worth reading if only for the Antonio Banderas intro.


WTF?! 

I'm on board for capes
post #4965 of 13859

There is also a link to @dieworkwear 's blog in there. 

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